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Why do people at my college not take mental health seriously watch

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    This is something that has been bothering me for a while at college (and last night when me and my friends were talking in our group chat) people in my college don't really respect people who have mental illnesses or people who has health issues.

    For example one time a girl (who has severe depression) hasn't been turning up to a few lessons , when the teacher asked if anyone knew where she was some other girl thought it would be funny to say "oh she's not in because she's using depression as an excuse to not show up to college" which isn't true at all and quite disrespectful , especially because she doesn't know what the girl who has depression is going through

    Another incident was i found one of my friends crying at the back of the library and when i went to comfort him he said he was crying because his friends didn't want to hang out with him because he had severe anxiety and an eating disorder, really felt bad for the guy because it's not something he can easily control.

    So how come people don't take mental health issues seriously enough , i wanna hear everyone's opinions , thanks
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    Have thought about this myself. I think there's the simple reason that physical problems are visible and so people can empathize with that situation. If you've never had a serious mental health issue it's much harder to understand what someone is going through.

    There's more to it than that mind but we also should have some optimism over how far we've come in society to how it's viewed. It doesn't help that a lot of pastoral care has been cut from schools due to budget tightening.
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    (Original post by Ray_Shadows)
    This is something that has been bothering me for a while at college (and last night when me and my friends were talking in our group chat) people in my college don't really respect people who have mental illnesses or people who has health issues.

    For example one time a girl (who has severe depression) hasn't been turning up to a few lessons , when the teacher asked if anyone knew where she was some other girl thought it would be funny to say "oh she's not in because she's using depression as an excuse to not show up to college" which isn't true at all and quite disrespectful , especially because she doesn't know what the girl who has depression is going through

    Another incident was i found one of my friends crying at the back of the library and when i went to comfort him he said he was crying because his friends didn't want to hang out with him because he had severe anxiety and an eating disorder, really felt bad for the guy because it's not something he can easily control.

    So how come people don't take mental health issues seriously enough , i wanna hear everyone's opinions , thanks
    It's very simple, it's because people in general are stupid. They don't understand, they don't want to understand and they think they'll look good and score points when they say stuff like someone is using depression as an excuse to not show up. I came to this conclusion at 13 and I've never changed my mind, most people are morons and they're not worth bothering with.
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    I think it's because it's hard to relate to if you don't suffer from it as it's all internal. Everyone goes through sh*t times in life and a lot of people don't take time off when their parents divorce, a relative dies, trouble at home etc. so when Sally with takes a week off because of depression it makes people think 'just pull yourself together'. But yes exactly, no one knows what this person is going through and how bad it is so it can be hard to empathise with them. Sometimes I think also it's because things like 'depression' and 'anxiety' get thrown around a lot these days because of increased awareness so people kind of self diagnose. And then everyone else who has been dealing with depression and anxiety their whole life but didn't know what to call it and continued to get on with life, is just like ?? come on now.
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    (Original post by Glassapple)
    It's very simple, it's because people in general are stupid. They don't understand, they don't want to understand and they think they'll look good and score points when they say stuff like someone is using depression as an excuse to not show up. I came to this conclusion at 13 and I've never changed my mind, most people are morons and they're not worth bothering with.
    it's even worse if they don't know much about the mental illness :/
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I think it's because it's hard to relate to if you don't suffer from it as it's all internal. Everyone goes through sh*t times in life and a lot of people don't take time off when their parents divorce, a relative dies, trouble at home etc. so when Sally with takes a week off because of depression it makes people think 'just pull yourself together'. But yes exactly, no one knows what this person is going through and how bad it is so it can be hard to empathise with them. Sometimes I think also it's because things like 'depression' and 'anxiety' get thrown around a lot these days because of increased awareness so people kind of self diagnose. And then everyone else who has been dealing with depression and anxiety their whole life but didn't know what to call it and continued to get on with life, is just like ?? come on now.
    i think there should be a class set aside for this kind of thing , to teach people about mental health/illnesses
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    (Original post by Ray_Shadows)
    i think there should be a class set aside for this kind of thing , to teach people about mental health/illnesses
    It is said out of malice, not a lack of understanding. People at that age are always going to be spiteful towards one another.
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    (Original post by Ray_Shadows)
    i think there should be a class set aside for this kind of thing , to teach people about mental health/illnesses
    I think that would make things worse tbh. Because then everyone will think they have depression when they feel a bit down or anxiety whenever they feel a bit nervous. I don't know if PSHE is still taught in schools but they mentioned it a few times in that. Definitely not enough but bear in mind that was many years ago when it wasn't talked about as much.
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    (Original post by Sceptical_John)
    Have thought about this myself. I think there's the simple reason that physical problems are visible and so people can empathize with that situation. If you've never had a serious mental health issue it's much harder to understand what someone is going through.

    There's more to it than that mind but we also should have some optimism over how far we've come in society to how it's viewed. It doesn't help that a lot of pastoral care has been cut from schools due to budget tightening.
    i get why people don't understand what the guy/girl with mental illness is going through

    but persecuting them because of their illness is bang out of order
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I think that would make things worse tbh. Because then everyone will think they have depression when they feel a bit down or anxiety whenever they feel a bit nervous. I don't know if PSHE is still taught in schools but they mentioned it a few times in that. Definitely not enough but bear in mind that was many years ago when it wasn't talked about as much.
    yeh that's a good point actually unless they get professionals involved
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    (Original post by Glassapple)
    It's very simple, it's because people in general are stupid. They don't understand, they don't want to understand and they think they'll look good and score points when they say stuff like someone is using depression as an excuse to not show up. I came to this conclusion at 13 and I've never changed my mind, most people are morons and they're not worth bothering with.
    Pretty much this.
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    It's difficult for people who have never experienced a mental health issue to understand it and that's often paired with it being difficult to see the effects of so people thinking you're faking or exaggerating.
    And people are frankly scared of the idea of illness and things like that so they try to make them less scary by saying it must be fake or making fun of it.

    Basically it comes down to ignorance (not necessarily by their fault) and human nature.
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    At school and college students run in packs and don't want to be seen as uncool. Also, where mental illness is concerned, people are afraid of things they don't understand and so their response is to react the way they do and that is in a negative attitude. The class tutor should have corrected the student who made negative remarks and enlightened them on how mental health works or he/she should have brought it to the attention of the college so that they address it because this is nothing short of bullying.
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    I think, without sounding too disconcerting. Some people are going through stages which are normal. It may be hard for some to distinguish between mental health issues and teenage angst.

    A lot of these issues are associated with emotions, so some may feel as though depression is just sadness and anxiety is just shyness, which they have "felt before", when it is not.

    It's hard for some people to understand. To a person who doesn't have these problems, it can be difficult for them to understand why I starve at times, because I don't want to go to the shop or why I just randomly start thinking about why I dislike life and shut myself off for some weeks. They see the solution as easy, "Just go to the shop" and "just go to the doctor", but when they don't experience these feelings, they cannot understand how these tasks can be difficult.

    Desensitization could play a part, I've heard people say "every man and his dog has anxiety and depression nowadays". So this repeated exposure to it desensitizes people.

    Also, kids are cruel.
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    (Original post by Sceptical_John)
    Have thought about this myself. I think there's the simple reason that physical problems are visible and so people can empathize with that situation.
    Most physical problems aren't visible at all.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    Most physical problems aren't visible at all.
    Interesting. What would a few examples be?

    I guess a more precise term would be easily perceptible problems.
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    (Original post by Sceptical_John)
    Interesting. What would a few examples be?

    I guess a more precise term would be easily perceptible problems.
    Hearing impairment, visual impairment, epilepsy, brain injury, etc.

    Physical disability is far more than being in a wheelchair.
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    (Original post by Sceptical_John)
    Have thought about this myself. I think there's the simple reason that physical problems are visible and so people can empathize with that situation. If you've never had a serious mental health issue it's much harder to understand what someone is going through.

    There's more to it than that mind but we also should have some optimism over how far we've come in society to how it's viewed. It doesn't help that a lot of pastoral care has been cut from schools due to budget tightening.
    I think you're right about the visual aspect. A lot of physical problems as also not visible (they're sometimes called "invisible illness" or "hidden disabilities") and people with those problems will face a lot of the same sigma and misunderstanding as people with mental health issues.

    Humans are observers and understand things better if they can see or experience it themselves in some way. Not being able to see something makes it harder to understand and sympathise with and also doesn't do anything to help the suspicion that people could be faking or exaggerating issues.

    I also think you're right about us coming a long way. I think things have improved and are improving in terms of awareness and understanding of various health issues. We still have a good way to go, but taking about it shows it's something people are thinking of and also helps spread more awareness and produce ideas. Hey even you learned something new with how you phrased that. That's pretty cool and gives me hope that people can be understanding, but just don't necessarily know how all the time.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    Hearing impairment, visual impairment, epilepsy, brain injury, etc.

    Physical disability is far more than being in a wheelchair.
    That's a good point. For me, brain injury/epilepsy would come under mental illness? at least in the sense, they are neurological disorders. But I'm not expert so could be corrected.

    I still believe there is a distinction to be made between those other physical disorders in that I could, to some extent, simulate a visual/hearing impairment on some rudimentary level whereas simulating a broken brain is much harder probably impossible outside of a lab. Which is why empathy can be difficult for those illnesses.
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    (Original post by Sceptical_John)
    That's a good point. For me, brain injury/epilepsy would come under mental illness? at least in the sense, they are neurological disorders. But I'm not expert so could be corrected.
    They're not mental illnesses. It's physical damage within the brain.
 
 
 
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