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Calling A Grade English Lit Students A-Level watch

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    (Original post by TheAlchemistress)
    Layers of interpretations. Context. There isn't much just AO2 and AO3.
    In regards to developing my analysis I would use a terminology and say how it has affected the character and the impact it has had. I would give a counter balanced argument sometimes, but I mostly stick to one side. I would try and give interpretations for Dr. Faustus, but that doesn't help I find it more easier to do it for romanticism.
    So, you're saying the key to producing a quality analytical piece of written work would be through breaking the writing down in more than one layer of interpretation. What do you think of this?

    Statement.
    Supporting quote.
    Explanation.
    Device.
    How this enforces it the idea stated in the initial statement.
    Picking out a keyword from the quote and discussing how this also conveys an alternative meaning.
    But how would one evaluate - do I bring up its relationship with the audience, context and themes?
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    (Original post by lionawilliams)
    So, you're saying the key to producing a quality analytical piece of written work would be through breaking the writing down in more than one layer of interpretation. What do you think of this?

    Statement.
    Supporting quote.
    Explanation.
    Device.
    How this enforces it the idea stated in the initial statement.
    Picking out a keyword from the quote and discussing how this also conveys an alternative meaning.
    But how would one evaluate - do I bring up its relationship with the audience, context and themes?
    Yes, I do it like this. I say how the audience would see it especially during the Elizabethan era, I don't talk about themes much only it's in the question I have to answer.
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    (Original post by TheAlchemistress)
    Yes, I do it like this. I say how the audience would see it especially during the Elizabethan era, I don't talk about themes much only it's in the question I have to answer.
    Should I compare to the modern audience?
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    (Original post by lionawilliams)
    Should I compare to the modern audience?
    We get told to do that, but I forget sometimes.
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    (Original post by TheAlchemistress)
    We get told to do that, but I forget sometimes.
    You can only do so much, also could you possibly write an example answer if that's not too much trouble, please?
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    Adding an attachment sample of how I write essays, I done 2 points only, with an intro and conclusion. Check back in 3 minutes, since I have to upload the essay.
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    (Original post by thealchemistress)
    glassapple
    auburnstar
    leapinglucy
    lionawilliams


    adding an attachment sample of how i write essays, i done 2 points only, with an intro and conclusion. Check back in 3 minutes, since i have to upload the essay.
    thank you so much, im so excited!
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    (Original post by TheAlchemistress)
    Essay sample.
    Glassapple
    LeapingLucy
    auburnstar
    lionawilliams
    Thank you, I really loved the read.
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    (Original post by lionawilliams)
    Thank you, I really loved the read.
    How did you find it?
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    (Original post by TheAlchemistress)
    How did you find it?
    I liked the structure of it, it's almost as the opinions came naturally to you and that's how it should feel. As well as that, I was really in touch with the develop vocabulary use, it was very intriguing and kept the written piece alive.
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    (Original post by TheAlchemistress)
    Essay sample.
    Just from skim reading (bear in mind I only skim read, so can't comment in the greatest detail) I would say that your literary analysis is good.

    What's lacking from the writing to pull up your grade is a clear sense of a strong argument that goes through each paragraph. I think there is also a tendency to say what is involved, without linking the AOs together. As a side note, write in the present and always address the author/ playwright as consciously using a literary device to have a certain effect.


    Because that's not super intuitive, here's an example from an essay I wrote that received an A*:

    "Whilst it may at first appear that in Othello, Venice is a liberal tolerant landscape, Shakespeare arguably reveals that this liberalism is only “skin-deep”. Although the audience understands Iago to be a scheming stage Machiavelli, his monstrous imagery of Othello and Desdemona creating the ‘beast with two backs’ could illustrate the prevailing miscegenation of Shakespeare’s time where mixed race ‘consumption’ was seen as a horrible act."

    The first sentence exposes the main argument I have for that paragraph - that the supposedly liberal landscape of Venice is superficial. The reference to stage Machiavelli and miscegenation (AO3 context) link with the monstrous imagery (AO2 writer's methods), and both context and method are addressed in that opening.

    Then I continue with some literary analysis, much like you do in your essay sample:

    "This is also illustrated in Desdemona’s presentation of her elopement as a ‘divided duty’ to the Senate; she, through legalistic language, must portray her ‘downright violence’ as a duteous or noble act in order to appeal to racist Venetian society. Perhaps the most convincing evidence of this false liberalism comes from Brabantio’s attitude towards ‘the Moor’. Othello recounts that Desdemona’s ‘father oft invited me’, which mixed with the animalistic foreign imagery of ‘Anthropophagi’ suggests that Othello - despite being a military general - is nothing more than an exotic guest. This invitation of course contrasts greatly with Brabantio’s hyperbolic and emotive language - an aspect of his comic role as the stock deceived father - when he describes Desdemona and Othello’s potential marriage. After Brabantio claims that this woe ‘engluts and swallows other sorrows’, the senators ask whether Desdemona is dead."

    Note the use of analytical, decisive language 'arguably', 'could be', 'perhaps the most convincing evidence', 'suggests that', 'contrasts greatly'. This builds a sense that this is leading towards an argument.

    "This not only enables a faintly humorous tone but may also suggest that his racial hatred is extreme in nature and more deeply rooted than first appears."

    This serves as a bookend in this paragraph to highlight what my argument is and what I have concluded from the analysis I've done in that paragraph.

    I don't think my example is perfect (it was an A*, but it was not full marks) and I don't think that there is one exact way to write an A* English essay. It's not intuitive and it took me a while. One main element is to always be analytical and discerning, and to use your points to back up a believable argument.
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    (Original post by lionawilliams)
    I liked the structure of it, it's almost as the opinions came naturally to you and that's how it should feel. As well as that, I was really in touch with the develop vocabulary use, it was very intriguing and kept the written piece alive.
    (Original post by auburnstar)
    Just from skim reading (bear in mind I only skim read, so can't comment in the greatest detail) I would say that your literary analysis is good.

    What's lacking from the writing to pull up your grade is a clear sense of a strong argument that goes through each paragraph. I think there is also a tendency to say what is involved, without linking the AOs together. As a side note, write in the present and always address the author/ playwright as consciously using a literary device to have a certain effect.


    Because that's not super intuitive, here's an example from an essay I wrote that received an A*:

    "Whilst it may at first appear that in Othello, Venice is a liberal tolerant landscape, Shakespeare arguably reveals that this liberalism is only “skin-deep”. Although the audience understands Iago to be a scheming stage Machiavelli, his monstrous imagery of Othello and Desdemona creating the ‘beast with two backs’ could illustrate the prevailing miscegenation of Shakespeare’s time where mixed race ‘consumption’ was seen as a horrible act."

    The first sentence exposes the main argument I have for that paragraph - that the supposedly liberal landscape of Venice is superficial. The reference to stage Machiavelli and miscegenation (AO3 context) link with the monstrous imagery (AO2 writer's methods), and both context and method are addressed in that opening.

    Then I continue with some literary analysis, much like you do in your essay sample:

    "This is also illustrated in Desdemona’s presentation of her elopement as a ‘divided duty’ to the Senate; she, through legalistic language, must portray her ‘downright violence’ as a duteous or noble act in order to appeal to racist Venetian society. Perhaps the most convincing evidence of this false liberalism comes from Brabantio’s attitude towards ‘the Moor’. Othello recounts that Desdemona’s ‘father oft invited me’, which mixed with the animalistic foreign imagery of ‘Anthropophagi’ suggests that Othello - despite being a military general - is nothing more than an exotic guest. This invitation of course contrasts greatly with Brabantio’s hyperbolic and emotive language - an aspect of his comic role as the stock deceived father - when he describes Desdemona and Othello’s potential marriage. After Brabantio claims that this woe ‘engluts and swallows other sorrows’, the senators ask whether Desdemona is dead."

    Note the use of analytical, decisive language 'arguably', 'could be', 'perhaps the most convincing evidence', 'suggests that', 'contrasts greatly'. This builds a sense that this is leading towards an argument.

    "This not only enables a faintly humorous tone but may also suggest that his racial hatred is extreme in nature and more deeply rooted than first appears."

    This serves as a bookend in this paragraph to highlight what my argument is and what I have concluded from the analysis I've done in that paragraph.

    I don't think my example is perfect (it was an A*, but it was not full marks) and I don't think that there is one exact way to write an A* English essay. It's not intuitive and it took me a while. One main element is to always be analytical and discerning, and to use your points to back up a believable argument.
    Thank you. ☺️

    Also if you know any other English lit students who get As please tell them to read the sample essay.
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    (Original post by TheAlchemistress)
    Thank you. ☺️

    Also if you know any other English lit students who get As please tell them to read the sample essay.
    Do you still need help?
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    (Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
    Do you still need help?
    I would appreciate it if you read my essay which I posted above, just for feedback.
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    Continually reference the key terms of the question. When you first read the question highlight or underline the key terms of the question and just use them over and over every single time you're making a point.

    Point - Evidence - Explain.

    Follow that pattern whilst answering the questions and make sure you're using relevant context because you won't get anywhere without context. I somehow got an A* in English Lit by doing all of the above ^^.
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    (Original post by likeamotownbeat)
    Continually reference the key terms of the question. When you first read the question highlight or underline the key terms of the question and just use them over and over every single time you're making a point.

    Point - Evidence - Explain.

    Follow that pattern whilst answering the questions and make sure you're using relevant context because you won't get anywhere without context. I somehow got an A* in English Lit by doing all of the above ^^.
    Thank you.
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    (Original post by auburnstar)
    Hi, I got an A* in English Literature (A* in all papers).

    My main advice is the following:

    1. Have a clear argument -> this is the most important thing. English lit essays are essentially argumentative - you answer a question through elaborating and proving a particular view (that eg Othello is a tragic hero, or that The Wife of Bath is a figure without morals etc).
    2. Answer the AOs in every single paragraph, check that you are hitting each assessment objective. I did Edexcel, so in certain essays, we would have to consider a critical viewpoint and refer to both socio-historical context and literary analysis.
    3. Start each paragraph with a topic sentence - a sentence that sums up your main kernel of the argument for that paragraph. End each paragraph with a sentence summarising what you have analysed and discovered. These serve as "bookends" for your argument and are useful for an examiner who is short on time.

    I have some examples of A* essays, including an essay very similar to an exam essay (same topic) that received an A* in the exam. If you want examples, I can provide some. English lit is really about nailing what they want, and once you figure that out it becomes a lot more intuitive (and it took me a while, I got a B at AS!).
    hii, well done on your A* in the exam, im currently in need of so much help to push my essay up to the top band and i was wondering if you could possibly send me some of your examples of A* essays? especially for othello. thank you so muchhh
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    (Original post by mozaregita)
    hii, well done on your A* in the exam, im currently in need of so much help to push my essay up to the top band and i was wondering if you could possibly send me some of your examples of A* essays? especially for othello. thank you so muchhh
    I can, but I am swamped with deadlines at the moment/taking a break and potentially going on holiday for a week. Chase me up with this via PM on or after 5th April and I'll be glad to help
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    (Original post by auburnstar)
    I can, but I am swamped with deadlines at the moment/taking a break and potentially going on holiday for a week. Chase me up with this via PM on or after 5th April and I'll be glad to help
    alright, thank you!! i really appreciate it. and enjoy your break
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    (Original post by auburnstar)
    Hi, I got an A* in English Literature (A* in all papers).

    My main advice is the following:

    1. Have a clear argument -> this is the most important thing. English lit essays are essentially argumentative - you answer a question through elaborating and proving a particular view (that eg Othello is a tragic hero, or that The Wife of Bath is a figure without morals etc).
    2. Answer the AOs in every single paragraph, check that you are hitting each assessment objective. I did Edexcel, so in certain essays, we would have to consider a critical viewpoint and refer to both socio-historical context and literary analysis.
    3. Start each paragraph with a topic sentence - a sentence that sums up your main kernel of the argument for that paragraph. End each paragraph with a sentence summarising what you have analysed and discovered. These serve as "bookends" for your argument and are useful for an examiner who is short on time.

    I have some examples of A* essays, including an essay very similar to an exam essay (same topic) that received an A* in the exam. If you want examples, I can provide some. English lit is really about nailing what they want, and once you figure that out it becomes a lot more intuitive (and it took me a while, I got a B at AS!).
    please can i see some examples as i have exams next week plz

    PM me plz
 
 
 
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