Comparison between Frankenstein and Handmaid's Tale Watch

username3387490
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How do you compare the two novels???
Linking factors?
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KatieJB
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Hi, I studied The Handmaid's Tale and Frankenstein 2 years ago, so some of what i say might be inaccurate. You could look at the biblical connotations; how Victor is 'playing God' and epigraphs from Paradise Lost and how biblical themes are resonated throughout the novel. The first of the three epigraphs in The Handmaid's Tale is from Genesis 30:1-3, which foreshadows a theme of religion throughout the book. The epigraphs in THT have a theme of feminism, and how Rachel and women alike do not have ownership of their bodies, and they are seen as 'vessels', thus dehumanising them- this is reflected in Frankenstein, as the monster, who is made out of human beings, isn't actually a human. Both novels challenge religion. THT shows biblical stories turned into reality in the dystopian world, and Frankenstein shows Victor being 'God-like' and 'all-knowing'. 'Playing God' could also be used to describe society in Gilead in THT- you could compare how Offred is manipulated by Commanders and how Victor manipulates the monster. The theme of religion and spirituality is carried throughout Frankenstein, hence the use of semantic fields.Offred in THT describes where she is before introducing herself, and similarly, the reader is introduced to Walton before Victor in Frankenstein. These techniques were used to draw the reader in and make us curious about the protagonists in each novel. However, Victor only addresses Walton, so the reader may be reflected as Walton's sister in the beginning of the novel, but in THT, there is more ambiguity as to who Offred is addressing. There's also a link of fertility and creating life. Also links to science vs religion, and makes the reader also question their morality. The role of nature in Frankenstein and how it contradicts the scientific and religious themes in Frankenstein and THT. Both books have reference to nature, as it is Victor's escape, and nature is used to symbolise fertility and how it is a woman's responsibility to provide children, hence the pears and the moon on the front cover of THT, and the quote 'I am a cloud, congealed around a central object, the shape of a pear, which is hard and more real than I am and glows red within it's translucent wrapping' (page 84). I hope some of this helps
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username3387490
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(Original post by KatieJB)
Hi, I studied The Handmaid's Tale and Frankenstein 2 years ago, so some of what i say might be inaccurate. You could look at the biblical connotations; how Victor is 'playing God' and epigraphs from Paradise Lost and how biblical themes are resonated throughout the novel. The first of the three epigraphs in The Handmaid's Tale is from Genesis 30:1-3, which foreshadows a theme of religion throughout the book. The epigraphs in THT have a theme of feminism, and how Rachel and women alike do not have ownership of their bodies, and they are seen as 'vessels', thus dehumanising them- this is reflected in Frankenstein, as the monster, who is made out of human beings, isn't actually a human. Both novels challenge religion. THT shows biblical stories turned into reality in the dystopian world, and Frankenstein shows Victor being 'God-like' and 'all-knowing'. 'Playing God' could also be used to describe society in Gilead in THT- you could compare how Offred is manipulated by Commanders and how Victor manipulates the monster. The theme of religion and spirituality is carried throughout Frankenstein, hence the use of semantic fields.Offred in THT describes where she is before introducing herself, and similarly, the reader is introduced to Walton before Victor in Frankenstein. These techniques were used to draw the reader in and make us curious about the protagonists in each novel. However, Victor only addresses Walton, so the reader may be reflected as Walton's sister in the beginning of the novel, but in THT, there is more ambiguity as to who Offred is addressing. There's also a link of fertility and creating life. Also links to science vs religion, and makes the reader also question their morality. The role of nature in Frankenstein and how it contradicts the scientific and religious themes in Frankenstein and THT. Both books have reference to nature, as it is Victor's escape, and nature is used to symbolise fertility and how it is a woman's responsibility to provide children, hence the pears and the moon on the front cover of THT, and the quote 'I am a cloud, congealed around a central object, the shape of a pear, which is hard and more real than I am and glows red within it's translucent wrapping' (page 84). I hope some of this helps
Oh wow, those are some of the ideas that I came up with too. Lot of information, very useful. Thanks so much
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