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is there any biomedical engineering and medicine dual degree program in the UK? watch

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    that may take, like 7 years??
    Eg in USA, duke university offers a combined MD/MEng program but the problem is that medicine is postgraduate in the US. Is there anything kinda similar in UK? thanks a lot. feedback is appreciated.
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    (Original post by sarah99630)
    that may take, like 7 years??
    Eg in USA, duke university offers a combined MD/MEng program but the problem is that medicine is postgraduate in the US. Is there anything kinda similar in UK? thanks a lot. feedback is appreciated.
    Have you looked at doing a Medicine + Intercalated degree?
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    I think Imperial lets you study an intercalated degree in biomedical engineering.
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    (Original post by ecolier)
    Have you looked at doing a Medicine + Intercalated degree?
    I'm sorry I've never heard of that haha. thanks, would u mind explaining please?
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    (Original post by sarah99630)
    I'm sorry I've never heard of that haha. thanks, would u mind explaining please?
    In the middle of your (usually 5 year) medical degree, you have the option of doing an extra year and gaining a BSc (degree). I am sure biomedical engineering is one of the options available. Focus on getting into medical school first!

    (PS I think most medical school offers the option of intercalation)
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    (Original post by ecolier)
    In the middle of your (usually 5 year) medical degree, you have the option of doing an extra year and gaining a BSc (degree). I am sure biomedical engineering is one of the options available. Focus on getting into medical school first!

    (PS I think most medical school offers the option of intercalation)
    OMG!! THAT IS IT!! Ahhh so like in that one year I can actually know a lot about biomedical engineering?!! That would be my dreaaam to become both honestly. I've been confused my whole life lol. thank you so much
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    (Original post by rickyrossman)
    I think Imperial lets you study an intercalated degree in biomedical engineering.
    ahh thank you so much! really with medicine?!
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    (Original post by sarah99630)
    OMG!! THAT IS IT!! Ahhh so like in that one year I can actually know a lot about biomedical engineering?!! That would be my dreaaam to become both honestly. I've been confused my whole life lol. thank you so much
    Yes, remember even if your medical school does not offer the course you want to do for intercalation, you may have the option to intercalate at another University. Good luck getting into medical school!
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    (Original post by ecolier)
    Yes, remember even if your medical school does not offer the course you want to do for intercalation, you may have the option to intercalate at another University. Good luck getting into medical school!
    Thanks a lot! does that mean I can work as both a biomedical engineer and a doctor? (at least theoretically haha) sorry if I sound repetitive. (I didn't know about this, your post just had a huge impact)
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    (Original post by sarah99630)
    Thanks a lot! does that mean I can work as both a biomedical engineer and a doctor? (at least theoretically haha) sorry if I sound repetitive. (I didn't know about this, your post just had a huge impact)
    Potentially... I don't know about the entry requirements to be a biomedical engineer though so make sure you have read them! You will get an extra degree (BSc) with your MBBS / MBChB though.
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    (Original post by ecolier)
    Potentially... I don't know about the entry requirements to be a biomedical engineer though so make sure you have read them! You will get an extra degree (BSc) with your MBBS / MBChB though.
    ahh this is worth taking a gap year for! (yep I missed all deadlines oops) Again, I really appreciate your post!! GOD BLESS YOU.
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    (Original post by sarah99630)
    ahh this is worth taking a gap year for! (yep I missed all deadlines oops) Again, I really appreciate your post!! GOD BLESS YOU.
    Depends if you want to become an engineer or doctor, med schools are competitive and its probably easier to gain a biomedical engineering offer at university than medicine (depends on uni) if your goal is to become an engineer. Also the intercalated degrees for biomedical engineering do exist however it mostly teaches the basics of biomedical engineering, and won't be in as much detail as a 3/4 year degree in biomed engineering.

    As far as I remember Imperial, UCL and Barts offer the intercalated courses, and you can also apply to them even if you don't go to their medical schools. Google "ibsc biomedical engineering" to see the courses.

    Alternatively you can apply for a bsc bioenginnering now and do graduate entry medicine to keep your options open (however grad entry med is also very competitive).
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    (Original post by YammyCookie)
    Can I just say that you should be clear whether you want to be an engineer or a doctor. Med schools very competitive and its probably easier to gain a biomedical engineering offer at university than medicine (depends on uni). Also the intercalated degrees for biomedical engineering exist however it mostly just gives an insight into engineering, and obviously won't be the same as a real 3 year bsc in biomed engineering.

    As far as I remember Imperial, UCL and Barts offer the intercalated courses, and you can also apply to them even if you don't go to their medical schools.

    Alternatively you can apply for a bsc bioenginnering now and do graduate entry medicine to keep your options open (however grad entry med is also very competitive).
    Aha I see! Thank you very much
    well I did think about the graduate medicine but ah idk my heart is heavy knowing im delaying like 3 years for treating people, which is why I am looking into the intercalated program. Then after I graduate, can't there, like, be a way that I can patch up on the stuff I've missed on biomedical engineering, because, considering BME also has some medicine courses in it, plus the intercalated progran which I would have completed? Also, maybe, getting access to a BMEng research lab part time or sth? Sorry if I sound confusing
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    (Original post by sarah99630)
    Aha I see! Thank you very much
    well I did think about the graduate medicine but ah idk my heart is heavy knowing im delaying like 3 years for treating people, which is why I am looking into the intercalated program. Then after I graduate, can't there, like, be a way that I can patch up on the stuff I've missed on biomedical engineering, because, considering BME also has some medicine courses in it, plus the intercalated progran which I would have completed? Also, maybe, getting access to a BMEng research lab part time or sth? Sorry if I sound confusing
    I mean the question for you to decide is whether you want to be a doctor involved in engineering research etc, or an actual biomedical engineer requiring a qualification in engineering.

    A problem with intercalated degrees is that you can't be guaranteed to recieve the programme of your choice for a variety of reasons, eg limited space, your ranking etc

    Getting into biomed engineering related research should be possible whether in medical school or as a doctor, so having knowledge of engineering is probably beneficial.

    I'm not sure what you mean by "patching up", perhaps self learning or doing part time degrees?
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    (Original post by ecolier)
    In the middle of your (usually 5 year) medical degree, you have the option of doing an extra year and gaining a BSc (degree). I am sure biomedical engineering is one of the options available. Focus on getting into medical school first!

    (PS I think most medical school offers the option of intercalation)
    sorry for bothering you, again, can I do the one year intercalated course AFTER my 5 years of medicine? or does it have to be inbetween? thanks in advance.
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    (Original post by sarah99630)
    sorry for bothering you, again, can I do the one year intercalated course AFTER my 5 years of medicine? or does it have to be inbetween? thanks in advance.
    It has to be in-between.
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    (Original post by YammyCookie)
    I mean the question for you to decide is whether you want to be a doctor involved in engineering research etc, or an actual biomedical engineer requiring a qualification in engineering.

    A problem with intercalated degrees is that you can't be guaranteed to recieve the programme of your choice for a variety of reasons, eg limited space, your ranking etc

    Getting into biomed engineering related research should be possible whether in medical school or as a doctor, so having knowledge of engineering is probably beneficial.

    I'm not sure what you mean by "patching up", perhaps self learning or doing part time degrees?
    A doctor who does excellent BMEng research as well. my stomach tightens when I'm asked to choose...
    yeah that's what I meant, self learning is possible?
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