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    Is there a difference between them. And does having an MSC In mechanical engineering still give you the chartered engineer status?
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    (Original post by Fishy289)
    Is there a difference between them. And does having an MSC In mechanical engineering still give you the chartered engineer status?
    An MSc is a standalone postgraduate masters degree.

    An MEng is an integrated undergraduate masters degree.

    Both are masters degrees and treated as equivalent in the UK, and hence both can be accredited, allowing you to achieve chartered status.

    The MSc lasts a full year, though, finishing in September-ish, whereas the MEng only lasts an academic year, meaning you'll be finished by the summer.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    An MSc is a standalone postgraduate masters degree.

    An MEng is an integrated undergraduate masters degree.

    Both are masters degrees and treated as equivalent in the UK, and hence both can be accredited, allowing you to achieve chartered status.

    The MSc lasts a full year, though, finishing in September-ish, whereas the MEng only lasts an academic year, meaning you'll be finished by the summer.
    OK, don't suppose u know anything about costs (i.e. student loans etc.) I assumed it would be the standard 9,000 quid but a friend said it would be more (for the MSC)
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    This is my post from another similar thread:

    Depends how fast you want the chartership. If you want to get internationally recognised (Eg EUR-ING for EU, PEng for Canada and USA), charter-ship is a must. As the engineering profession is not protected in the UK (see: Boiler/Gas Engineers ), chartership ensures you have the capability and proof you are a competent professional engineer.

    If you want to be chartered Fast, MEng is the fastest (9 month for the extra year, October - June/July finish at most unis), and the "added on loan" will never be paid off as either: A: UK salaries are low enough (even for a chartered engineer) that the debt is written off by the time you're up to paying the MEng fees, or B: Out of the country using the MEng elsewhere.

    MSc (accredited by engineering council http://www.engc.org.uk/education-ski...course-search/) is 12 months (Sept - Sept), and unless you have fees and accomodation money saved up / paid for by Mummy and Daddy Banking PLC, you have to get the Postgrad loan, which is paid back *at the same time* as the Undergrad loan, which the MEng uses. See: https://www.imperial.ac.uk/study/pg/...masters-study/. Any of the decent MSc unis also charge 10k+ (Warwick, UCl, Birmingham, Southampton etc.), so the loan only covers the fees. Bearing in mind the MSc is usually much more technical and intensive for the same goal (chartership), so unless you get on an accredited course in something you want to specialise in.

    I'm currently on MEng Mechanical, I made the choices last year. For me personally I would have liked to do an MSc, but financially it was a huge burden. The MEng money I will never see for the reasons mentioned above.
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    (Original post by ms2013)
    This is my post from another similar thread:

    Depends how fast you want the chartership. If you want to get internationally recognised (Eg EUR-ING for EU, PEng for Canada and USA), charter-ship is a must. As the engineering profession is not protected in the UK (see: Boiler/Gas Engineers ), chartership ensures you have the capability and proof you are a competent professional engineer.

    If you want to be chartered Fast, MEng is the fastest (9 month for the extra year, October - June/July finish at most unis), and the "added on loan" will never be paid off as either: A: UK salaries are low enough (even for a chartered engineer) that the debt is written off by the time you're up to paying the MEng fees, or B: Out of the country using the MEng elsewhere.

    MSc (accredited by engineering council http://www.engc.org.uk/education-ski...course-search/) is 12 months (Sept - Sept), and unless you have fees and accomodation money saved up / paid for by Mummy and Daddy Banking PLC, you have to get the Postgrad loan, which is paid back *at the same time* as the Undergrad loan, which the MEng uses. See: https://www.imperial.ac.uk/study/pg/...masters-study/. Any of the decent MSc unis also charge 10k+ (Warwick, UCl, Birmingham, Southampton etc.), so the loan only covers the fees. Bearing in mind the MSc is usually much more technical and intensive for the same goal (chartership), so unless you get on an accredited course in something you want to specialise in.

    I'm currently on MEng Mechanical, I made the choices last year. For me personally I would have liked to do an MSc, but financially it was a huge burden. The MEng money I will never see for the reasons mentioned above.
    So would you say the MSC is harder? And when you say for the Meng it won't get paid off, surely a chartered engineer (average salary 60k) would end up paying it off.
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    (Original post by ms2013)
    This is my post from another similar thread:

    Depends how fast you want the chartership. If you want to get internationally recognised (Eg EUR-ING for EU, PEng for Canada and USA), charter-ship is a must. As the engineering profession is not protected in the UK (see: Boiler/Gas Engineers ), chartership ensures you have the capability and proof you are a competent professional engineer.

    If you want to be chartered Fast, MEng is the fastest (9 month for the extra year, October - June/July finish at most unis), and the "added on loan" will never be paid off as either: A: UK salaries are low enough (even for a chartered engineer) that the debt is written off by the time you're up to paying the MEng fees, or B: Out of the country using the MEng elsewhere.

    MSc (accredited by engineering council http://www.engc.org.uk/education-ski...course-search/) is 12 months (Sept - Sept), and unless you have fees and accomodation money saved up / paid for by Mummy and Daddy Banking PLC, you have to get the Postgrad loan, which is paid back *at the same time* as the Undergrad loan, which the MEng uses. See: https://www.imperial.ac.uk/study/pg/...masters-study/. Any of the decent MSc unis also charge 10k+ (Warwick, UCl, Birmingham, Southampton etc.), so the loan only covers the fees. Bearing in mind the MSc is usually much more technical and intensive for the same goal (chartership), so unless you get on an accredited course in something you want to specialise in.

    I'm currently on MEng Mechanical, I made the choices last year. For me personally I would have liked to do an MSc, but financially it was a huge burden. The MEng money I will never see for the reasons mentioned above.
    I thought if you go out the country they still want you to pay the debt?
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    (Original post by Fishy289)
    So would you say the MSC is harder? And when you say for the Meng it won't get paid off, surely a chartered engineer (average salary 60k) would end up paying it off.
    Yes this is something I can't stress enough, university engineering in the UK is not a golden ticket to money (though it helps ), if it was a lot less school leavers would be getting in . Only the guys in finance/banking will stand a chance of ever paying off the loans. It's a tricky balance as if you are smack bang in the middle earner, you could end up paying more off than someone who is at the top end due to the interest catching up before the 30 year cut off point (they'll pay it off quicker). There used to be a calculator by the Telegraph, but I've found this one:

    Try this calculator, put in 4 years degree, average starting salary of 28k, (Current for Engineering), and adjust the salary growth until it says about ~£70k for after 30 years (Principal Engineer top end in the UK). It'll always say wiped debt, unless your maintenance loan is peanuts.

    https://www.moneysavingexpert.com/st...nce-calculator

    Edit: Found the telegraph (it's excellent)

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/money/stu...d-save-over-2/
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    (Original post by Fishy289)
    OK, don't suppose u know anything about costs (i.e. student loans etc.) I assumed it would be the standard 9,000 quid but a friend said it would be more (for the MSC)
    Some universities charge less for an MSc but typically it's about £10k. The Postgrad Loan is also about £10k but that's it, there's no seperate maintenance loan, the postgrad loan is designed to go towards both tuition AND maintenance.

    So the MEng can be a financially more straightforward route than BEng+MSc.
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    K thanks for the help guys
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    (Original post by ms2013)
    Yes this is something I can't stress enough, university engineering in the UK is not a golden ticket to money (though it helps ), if it was a lot less school leavers would be getting in . Only the guys in finance/banking will stand a chance of ever paying off the loans. It's a tricky balance as if you are smack bang in the middle earner, you could end up paying more off than someone who is at the top end due to the interest catching up before the 30 year cut off point (they'll pay it off quicker). There used to be a calculator by the Telegraph, but I've found this one:

    Try this calculator, put in 4 years degree, average starting salary of 28k, (Current for Engineering), and adjust the salary growth until it says about ~£70k for after 30 years (Principal Engineer top end in the UK). It'll always say wiped debt, unless your maintenance loan is peanuts.

    https://www.moneysavingexpert.com/st...nce-calculator

    Edit: Found the telegraph (it's excellent)

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/money/stu...d-save-over-2/
    In 30 years a "principal engineer" will be earning a lot more than £70k. Inflation affects wages as well as spending.
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    In 30 years a "principal engineer" will be earning a lot more than £70k. Inflation affects wages as well as spending.
    DOH! on my part.
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    In 30 years a "principal engineer" will be earning a lot more than £70k. Inflation affects wages as well as spending.
    It's possible but usually unlikely tbh (if you've been working for the same company for a long time, that is) and it's depressing.

    One very experienced engineer who was aged around 60 with something like 25+ years experience was not even at £70k/pa. Working for companies usually ends up hindering you to a certain extent. Lecturers/head of departments at universities for example are paid much more lucrative salaries.

    In engineering though if you want to make the big bucks then become a contractor and be competent in some niche skill.
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    (Original post by ms2013)
    DOH! on my part.
    £28k today at an average 2.5% inflation will be nearly £60k in 30 years time.
    £70k today would be £147k in 30 years.

    Long-term compounding is a very powerful affect.
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    £28k today at an average 2.5% inflation will be nearly £60k in 30 years time.
    £70k today would be £147k in 30 years.

    Long-term compounding is a very powerful affect.
    Cheers mate
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    £28k today at an average 2.5% inflation will be nearly £60k in 30 years time.
    £70k today would be £147k in 30 years.

    Long-term compounding is a very powerful affect.
    Thanks man, brain fart there forgetting about inflation!!
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    (Original post by ms2013)
    Thanks man, brain fart there forgetting about inflation!!
    To be fair, so has The Telegraph. There's no point talking about the future value of money without mentioning it.

    So your future salary will be a function of both your increasing seniority, improved skills/experience, managerial progression, and wage inflation.

    Oh and the best way to earn more money is almost always to change employer every now and again. That's usually when you get the biggest incremental increases.
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    To be fair, so has The Telegraph. There's no point talking about the future value of money without mentioning it.

    So your future salary will be a function of both your increasing seniority, improved skills/experience, managerial progression, and wage inflation.

    Oh and the best way to earn more money is almost always to change employer every now and again. That's usually when you get the biggest incremental increases.
    Of course

    Thanks for pointing that out about the telegraph one, in reality the graph would have sudden jumps when you switch it up in positions.
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    (Original post by Fishy289)
    OK, don't suppose u know anything about costs (i.e. student loans etc.) I assumed it would be the standard 9,000 quid but a friend said it would be more (for the MSC)
    I don't know much about MSc costs, sorry. Many will certainly be more than £9,000 however there must be some under that if students are opting for them rather than the MEng. Have a look around for MSc degrees that you would be interested in and check their fees. Of course, living expenses are also worth considering too, it's not necessarily just about the upfront fee for the masters degree.
 
 
 
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