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    Basically the title.
    I have been looking at the eligibility for the partners scheme in the hope that I would be eligible, as have seen far more people than I expected say that they have been able to apply through it - unfortunately I am not, but was worth a look just in case.
    However, while I was looking through the lists of schools that if you attended mean that you can go to Newcastle with lower grades, I noticed that there were numerous private schools at both secondary and sixth-form level that are in my area that were on the list. Therefore, I am just wondering how this works, considering my own state-school and college means I need the standard entry requirements (as would be expected), yet those who have been fortunate enough to go to some private schools get a reduced offer - something I had assumed was only for the students who had had to attend sub-standard state schools through no fault of their own in order to try and level the playing field for them?
    Just wondering if anyone can explain this or if there is a reason for it, because at the moment I can't think of one and it seems unfair, when most likely they are receiving a better education and higher standard of teaching than me and many others receive who are educated through the state.
    Many thanks in advance for any replies as am genuinely curious for the reasons behind it!
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    (Original post by rosiemoon_)
    Basically the title.
    I have been looking at the eligibility for the partners scheme in the hope that I would be eligible, as have seen far more people than I expected say that they have been able to apply through it - unfortunately I am not, but was worth a look just in case.
    However, while I was looking through the lists of schools that if you attended mean that you can go to Newcastle with lower grades, I noticed that there were numerous private schools at both secondary and sixth-form level that are in my area that were on the list. Therefore, I am just wondering how this works, considering my own state-school and college means I need the standard entry requirements (as would be expected), yet those who have been fortunate enough to go to some private schools get a reduced offer - something I had assumed was only for the students who had had to attend sub-standard state schools through no fault of their own in order to try and level the playing field for them?
    Just wondering if anyone can explain this or if there is a reason for it, because at the moment I can't think of one and it seems unfair, when most likely they are receiving a better education and higher standard of teaching than me and many others receive who are educated through the state.
    Many thanks in advance for any replies as am genuinely curious for the reasons behind it!
    Are you looking at the list here?

    http://www.ncl.ac.uk/schools/partner...y/last-school/

    According to information on the Newcastle University site if you attend any of these schools/colleges then you will meet this criteria

    you attended a school in England at age 16 where the GCSE Attainment 8 score is 37 or less **

    OR

    you attended a school in Northern Ireland at age 16 where the number of students achieving five or more GCSE grades A* to C, including English and Maths, is 35% or less**

    OR


    you currently attend a school in England where the average point score per A Level entry is 20 or less**

    OR

    you currently attend a school in Northern Ireland where the number of students achieving three or more A Levels grades A* to C is 35% or less**

    ** School performance data for GCSE and post-16 are those quoted by the Department of Education for 2017.

    What schools on that list are private independent schools/colleges?
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    Well, for example, just scrolling through the listed schools under 'C' at random, there are a number of schools I recognise simply based on their prestigious reputation alone that are on the list, I'm sure there are others, however these are just ones I recognised as being private and known as good places to be educated - I'm sure there are others on the list but I'm not going to look up every single one.
    Charterhouse, Godalming
    Chelsea Independent College
    Christs Hospital, Horsham
    Cheltenham College
    City of London School for Girls
    Cranleigh School
    Culford School
    http://www.ncl.ac.uk/schools/partner...-school/#linkC

    I'm not trying to unjustly criticise PARTNERS, as I think it is a commendable scheme on the Universities part - I am just genuinely curious as to why these schools are on there, as it seems bizarre to me.

    *edit - just out of curiosity looked to see if I could find specific schools on there, beginning with what are the most expensive and prestigious boys private schools in England (which is often viewed as being Eton, Harrow, Charterhouse, Radley, Wellington and Sherborne) - ALL of these bar Eton are eligible - when they are seen by many as the best schools in the country?
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    I think you have a corrupt link. Check the one I posted and compare it to yours. It would be more than a little surprising if the schools you have listed met the criteria for an under performing school
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    (Original post by rosiemoon_)
    Basically the title.
    I have been looking at the eligibility for the partners scheme in the hope that I would be eligible, as have seen far more people than I expected say that they have been able to apply through it - unfortunately I am not, but was worth a look just in case.
    However, while I was looking through the lists of schools that if you attended mean that you can go to Newcastle with lower grades, I noticed that there were numerous private schools at both secondary and sixth-form level that are in my area that were on the list. Therefore, I am just wondering how this works, considering my own state-school and college means I need the standard entry requirements (as would be expected), yet those who have been fortunate enough to go to some private schools get a reduced offer - something I had assumed was only for the students who had had to attend sub-standard state schools through no fault of their own in order to try and level the playing field for them?
    Just wondering if anyone can explain this or if there is a reason for it, because at the moment I can't think of one and it seems unfair, when most likely they are receiving a better education and higher standard of teaching than me and many others receive who are educated through the state.
    Many thanks in advance for any replies as am genuinely curious for the reasons behind it!

    Hi rosiemoon_,

    I queried this with our PARTNERS team for you and here's what they have advised:

    'There are two lists as one relates to the school attended for GCSE and the other for A Levels. In regards to the comments made about some well-regarded private schools being on the list, they do all meet the criteria using data set out by the government (you can view the school performance information on the DofE website: https://www.compare-school-performance.service.gov.uk/). However, I do appreciate that this is confusing and it is something that we will review when looking at the eligibility criteria going forward.'

    Hope this helps 😊

    Susie
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    Hi, thanks for your response. I was hoping that I was wrong and had misunderstood the information, but unfortunately not. Surely it is ridiculous and completely unfair to all other applicants that attended regular state schools, that those who are already at a massive advantage due to the privilege of being able to attend some of the most elite private schools in the UK, if not the world, are then part of a scheme that I though was there to help those who have been the victim of an inadequate education due to circumstances out of their controlled - not the most well off people in the country?

    I find it extremely morally wrong and almost scandalous that, for example, a regular student at a state school is (as standard) expected to meet the regular entry requirements of a course, say AAB, and is therefore going to have to work extremely hard to achieve those grades.
    Yet someone who is privileged enough to have gone to Harrow since the age of 13, completed their IGCSE's there, and is now doing their A-levels there as well, gets an offer of BBB for the same course and university, due to being eligible for a scheme that is in place to support DISADVANTAGED students - which is something they are definitely not.
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    (Original post by rosiemoon_)
    Hi, thanks for your response. I was hoping that I was wrong and had misunderstood the information, but unfortunately not. Surely it is ridiculous and completely unfair to all other applicants that attended regular state schools, that those who are already at a massive advantage due to the privilege of being able to attend some of the most elite private schools in the UK, if not the world, are then part of a scheme that I though was there to help those who have been the victim of an inadequate education due to circumstances out of their controlled - not the most well off people in the country?

    I find it extremely morally wrong and almost scandalous that, for example, a regular student at a state school is (as standard) expected to meet the regular entry requirements of a course, say AAB, and is therefore going to have to work extremely hard to achieve those grades.
    Yet someone who is privileged enough to have gone to Harrow since the age of 13, completed their IGCSE's there, and is now doing their A-levels there as well, gets an offer of BBB for the same course and university, due to being eligible for a scheme that is in place to support DISADVANTAGED students - which is something they are definitely not.
    I'm sorry I thought you had looked at an incorrect Link because I too couldn't understand why some of the schools listed would be on a list for low achievement at GCSE.

    The information on the Partners page says they have got information on schools performance at GCSE from
    Department of Education for 2017.

    I checked what the Department of education had to say about Harrow

    https://www.compare-school-performan.../school/102245

    It does have a figure of 0% obtaining GCSE's in English and Maths. So presumably this is how the school has come to be listed as one of the under achieving schools on the PARTNERS list. But this is definitely a case of the Department of Educations data not reflecting the true achievements of Harrows pupils. Either they haven't been given the data so have put 0 or Harrow use IGCSE's rather than standard GCSE's. Whatever Harrow is not an under-performing school and should not be on this list.
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    (Original post by rosiemoon_)
    Hi, thanks for your response. I was hoping that I was wrong and had misunderstood the information, but unfortunately not. Surely it is ridiculous and completely unfair to all other applicants that attended regular state schools, that those who are already at a massive advantage due to the privilege of being able to attend some of the most elite private schools in the UK, if not the world, are then part of a scheme that I though was there to help those who have been the victim of an inadequate education due to circumstances out of their controlled - not the most well off people in the country?

    I find it extremely morally wrong and almost scandalous that, for example, a regular student at a state school is (as standard) expected to meet the regular entry requirements of a course, say AAB, and is therefore going to have to work extremely hard to achieve those grades.
    Yet someone who is privileged enough to have gone to Harrow since the age of 13, completed their IGCSE's there, and is now doing their A-levels there as well, gets an offer of BBB for the same course and university, due to being eligible for a scheme that is in place to support DISADVANTAGED students - which is something they are definitely not.


    Hi rosiemoon_,

    This did seem very odd indeed! I chased this for you and our team have been back in touch (after a bit of investigating) with some good news:

    'Thank you for raising this with the PARTNERS team. The inclusion of the schools you have mentioned has been an error due to a change in the way the school data has been provided to us this year.
    This has meant that these schools do, in fact, fall well below the PARTNERS required threshold for school performance, however, this is for other reasons that were not ascertained from looking at the data and should not make them eligible on school performance criteria.
    I would like to reassure you that no applications have been received from these schools and if we had received any this would have brought the problem to our attention earlier. We will of course rectify this immediately.
    Thank you again for raising this and best wishes.'

    Hope this helps 😊

    Susie
 
 
 
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