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    Budget
    £500

    Subject being studied
    Film Production

    Software that will be used
    Microsoft office, Sony vegas, Adobe photoshop, Adobe after effects

    Screen size
    15.6 inches

    Operating system preference
    Windows

    Minimum amount of RAM
    8GB

    Minimum battery life
    8 hours

    Minimum storage requirement
    1TB

    Weight limit
    N/A

    Used for playing games?
    No

    If yes, what games?
    -

    Touchscreen needed?
    No

    Are there any specific ports you need?
    N/A

    What devices do you have currently?
    HP Laptop (I'm just worried that this one isn't enough for sony vegas and AE), Samsung phone

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    What are the specs of the HP laptop you already own?

    Since you already own a laptop, do you have to buy another laptop? Could you not buy a desktop for the intensive tasks and keep the laptop for basic "out and about" stuff?
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    What are the specs of the HP laptop you already own?

    Since you already own a laptop, do you have to buy another laptop? Could you not buy a desktop for the intensive tasks and keep the laptop for basic "out and about" stuff?
    Sorry for the late reply! TSR, for some weird reason, hasn't notified me of your reply.

    Specs:
    Processor: Intel(R) Pentium(R) CPU 3825U @ 1.90GHz
    Installed Ram: 8GB
    Screen resolution: 15.6”
    Hard drive: 2TB 5400 rpm
    GPU: intel(R) HD graphics

    I was thinking of getting a desktop and using this laptop for "out of home" stuff. However, it would be easier for me to be able to do things on this laptop as I would be able to take it with me wherever I need to go. I was hoping whether my current laptop would be enough, but I am worried that it isn't (I've done research prior and it doesn't seem like it)
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    (Original post by Fluffybunneh)
    Sorry for the late reply! TSR, for some weird reason, hasn't notified me of your reply.

    Specs:
    Processor: Intel(R) Pentium(R) CPU 3825U @ 1.90GHz
    Installed Ram: 8GB
    Screen resolution: 15.6”
    Hard drive: 2TB 5400 rpm
    GPU: intel(R) HD graphics

    I was thinking of getting a desktop and using this laptop for "out of home" stuff. However, it would be easier for me to be able to do things on this laptop as I would be able to take it with me wherever I need to go. I was hoping whether my current laptop would be enough, but I am worried that it isn't (I've done research prior and it doesn't seem like it)
    You'd be right there, in that it won't be ideal. That said the only thing technically holding you back would be the processor.

    Based on your budget, you'll get similar specs to this but you'll get an upgraded CPU, something in the i5 range with a £500 budget.

    This is my default recommendation for your budget, i5 8250U, 8GB RAM and a 128GB SSD. That's about as powerful as you can get in the £500 range, there's no way you'll get hold of a GPU or better processor without increasing your budget. I don't know how intensive your work is so no idea if it'll be capable but you won't find much better tbh. It'll run things like Photoshop but depending on what you are doing, it might not be pretty.

    The 128GB SSD is also not ideal, since I'd assume you'll be working with big files. Along the same lines, I don't recommend simply keeping all your data on the laptop so you can use it out and about, that's a recipe for disaster and you'll want to be backing things up properly. So that might mean investing a bit more in a few 1TB external hard drives to use for storage and backup, which also deals with the low local storage issue. Cloud storage is also an option, although if you've got large files to work with it might not be ideal. Comparatively a desktop would offer the same performance but have more potential for backing up and storing your files at a lower price point, the obvious trade off being you can't carry it around with you. That said, it's also far more convenient to work off a decent sized monitor rather than a a small 14/15 inch display. A proper keyboard and mouse is nice to have too. But that's my personal preference, if you're alright working off a laptop then that's fine.
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    You'd be right there, in that it won't be ideal. That said the only thing technically holding you back would be the processor.

    Based on your budget, you'll get similar specs to this but you'll get an upgraded CPU, something in the i5 range with a £500 budget.

    This is my default recommendation for your budget, i5 8250U, 8GB RAM and a 128GB SSD. That's about as powerful as you can get in the £500 range, there's no way you'll get hold of a GPU or better processor without increasing your budget. I don't know how intensive your work is so no idea if it'll be capable but you won't find much better tbh. It'll run things like Photoshop but depending on what you are doing, it might not be pretty.

    The 128GB SSD is also not ideal, since I'd assume you'll be working with big files. Along the same lines, I don't recommend simply keeping all your data on the laptop so you can use it out and about, that's a recipe for disaster and you'll want to be backing things up properly. So that might mean investing a bit more in a few 1TB external hard drives to use for storage and backup, which also deals with the low local storage issue. Cloud storage is also an option, although if you've got large files to work with it might not be ideal. Comparatively a desktop would offer the same performance but have more potential for backing up and storing your files at a lower price point, the obvious trade off being you can't carry it around with you. That said, it's also far more convenient to work off a decent sized monitor rather than a a small 14/15 inch display. A proper keyboard and mouse is nice to have too. But that's my personal preference, if you're alright working off a laptop then that's fine.
    Yeah, I thought that the processor wouldn't be enough (I've seen people recommend an i7 processor). It's just general video editing with short films and such (Most of my films don't go over 10 minute), so not really intense.

    I am planning to get an external hard drive as I would need it for storage. But, I will take your advice to consideration and try to see whether I could push my budget a bit more or keep looking.
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    (Original post by Fluffybunneh)
    Yeah, I thought that the processor wouldn't be enough (I've seen people recommend an i7 processor). It's just general video editing with short films and such (Most of my films don't go over 10 minute), so not really intense.

    I am planning to get an external hard drive as I would need it for storage. But, I will take your advice to consideration and try to see whether I could push my budget a bit more or keep looking.
    The general rule is that the better your hardware, the faster you'll get stuff done (videos render faster for example). While an i7 is nice, an i5 will run things like Photoshop. Might not be fast but it'll run.

    That said, when people recommend i7s they're also usually talking about desktop grade chips, which are quad cores. Laptops have historically been dual cores unless you get the high performance chips and it's only recently that laptops have offered low spec machines with quad cores (Intel introduced general use quad core chips with their gen 8 CPUs). As a result, the advice you'll see online might be a little outdated. An older quad core desktop i5 may outperform a laptop dual core i7 for example since it has more cores and probably runs at a higher clock. Desktops will also draw more power. That's still true but the bar has been heightened. When you're looking around for laptops, try to find ones with 8th gen CPUs (the model number starts with an 8, like the i5 8250U in the laptop I linked before). They're still low power chips but they'll offer a significant boost over older dual core versions.

    In terms of budget, you'll likely have to make sacrifices if you want to stay within close to your current budget. In terms of rough specs, you don't want anything with less than an i5 processor and 8GB of RAM. You'll also want a decent 1080p display for editing work and either a large hard drive or dual drives for an SSD/HDD combo. The laptop I linked offers everything besides the storage requirement (and an SSD is not a bad tradeoff) at just under your budget. This is currently very unusual and I consider that laptop to be really good value right now. You're more likely to find alternative devices have older dual core processors, 4GB of RAM instead of 8GB, or a 1366x768 display rather than 1080p. If you are looking around, be super careful with other devices, especially if they don't tell you the CPU model (that's pretty common, many sites just write i5) or just generally don't supply useful info.
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    The general rule is that the better your hardware, the faster you'll get stuff done (videos render faster for example). While an i7 is nice, an i5 will run things like Photoshop. Might not be fast but it'll run.

    That said, when people recommend i7s they're also usually talking about desktop grade chips, which are quad cores. Laptops have historically been dual cores unless you get the high performance chips and it's only recently that laptops have offered low spec machines with quad cores (Intel introduced general use quad core chips with their gen 8 CPUs). As a result, the advice you'll see online might be a little outdated. An older quad core desktop i5 may outperform a laptop dual core i7 for example since it has more cores and probably runs at a higher clock. Desktops will also draw more power. That's still true but the bar has been heightened. When you're looking around for laptops, try to find ones with 8th gen CPUs (the model number starts with an 8, like the i5 8250U in the laptop I linked before). They're still low power chips but they'll offer a significant boost over older dual core versions.

    In terms of budget, you'll likely have to make sacrifices if you want to stay within close to your current budget. In terms of rough specs, you don't want anything with less than an i5 processor and 8GB of RAM. You'll also want a decent 1080p display for editing work and either a large hard drive or dual drives for an SSD/HDD combo. The laptop I linked offers everything besides the storage requirement (and an SSD is not a bad tradeoff) at just under your budget. This is currently very unusual and I consider that laptop to be really good value right now. You're more likely to find alternative devices have older dual core processors, 4GB of RAM instead of 8GB, or a 1366x768 display rather than 1080p. If you are looking around, be super careful with other devices, especially if they don't tell you the CPU model (that's pretty common, many sites just write i5) or just generally don't supply useful info.
    Thank you so much! I will take a lot of what you've said in consideration and hopefully I'll be able to get somewhere. But yeah, thank you for the advice :>
 
 
 
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