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Universities should give you a 30% refund on the entire course if you can't get a job watch

  • View Poll Results: Do you like the idea of Universities having to refund you ?
    Yes this is a great idea
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    No
    31
    81.58%

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    Based on my own experience and those of friend's and family, most Universities teach you very little of the skills that employers want in their future employees.

    And once you graduate they don't really care what happens to you, because they already took your money.

    So this is my suggestion. The government should force all universities to provide students match making services with prospective employers and if they haven't been able to place a willing student with a job that pays at least the average entry level wage for their sector of study within 18 months of graduation they must pay the student a 30% refund on their entire course.

    I think once the Universities are faced with the prospect of having to refund students the quality of the courses will go through the roof.

    Also league tables can be kept which help new students see which Universities do the most to help people get decent jobs and how quickly.
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    Even though I see the purpose behind what you're saying, I'm not entirely sure I agree. The primary purpose of University knowledge is typically the acquisition of knowledge, not a warm-up for the job market. If somebody's primary goal is to find a job, their course should be very much in demand, and their university should be one that focuses on sillsets.
    That isn't to say that other universities can't help with careers, but most universities typically care about the quality and depth of the knowledge they teach more than their applicability.
    If a system like what you said is set up, the incentive to explore the intellectual world gets widely reduced. Besides, it's easy to think "entry level job" with regard to things such as medicine, engineering, education, finance, etc. but what about someone who studies art history? The middle ages? Latin?

    you'd be creating an incentive for universities to remove courses that might not be as directly applicable.
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    why? what if a person has *****y interview rechnique? Or got a bad grade, or studied a subject that has little demand? Students need to take more responsibility for their learning.
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    (Original post by coolforcatz)
    ... Students need to take more responsibility for their learning.
    Really? Students aren't designing the courses themselves .. If they were, why not teach yourself and save yourself £50,000 worth of debt.

    I don't know many Degrees out there that after 3 or 4 years on the day the student graduates they're qualified to walk into a job and know what they're doing.

    where as I recently came across an IT training company that in 3 months at a cost of £7,000 will train you in skills that employers actually want and they have strong links with employers to make sure everyone gets a shot at a job right after and what skills they are learning are directly relevant to he work place.
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    (Original post by Seffire)
    ...If a system like what you said is set up, the incentive to explore the intellectual world gets widely reduced..
    Hence why I used the word WILLING student ... if the student just wants to learn a subject and doesn't care if they go into a job afterwards then there's no penalty for the University.

    Same if all they want to do after University is travel the world and not settle down.
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    Universities operate in a market, driven by demand and supply, with undergraduates providing income for the true focus of the better institutions: research. The demise of the ineffectual degrees will occur when students stop applying for them, or if there is a structural modification. There's a natural selection to the graduate recruitment market, and rightly so, given the oversupply of graduates.
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    How would this work?

    Some industries are harder to get into. Would that mean the uni has to give the student money? And how many years down the line would the student have to wait before they can sue (which is what you're implying) the uni? And what if the course generally speaking doesn't have a high employability rate after? Why should the uni be penalised for that?

    Shouldn't you (the student) do your own research before embarking on a course that may have a low amount of graduates?
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    Although I see where you're coming from, I don't think it's the university's responsibility to ensure their graduates secure jobs. As others have already said, universities provide people with an education, they're not there to feed you into the job market (other than in the case of vocational courses).

    It's the individuals' responsibility to find work by applying the knowledge they've gained from studying. Besides, if they don't end up getting such high-paying roles, they're less likely to ever pay back the majority of their student loan, therefore a 30% 'refund' would make little to no difference to them.
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    For a 30% refund many people would find creative ways of making themselves unemployable.

    Realistically the reason so many struggle to find a job with their degree upon graduation is they have studied something useless for 3 years and should have done something more worthwhile with their time. To reward this would just encourage more people to study unemployable subjects.
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    (Original post by VMD100)
    Realistically the reason so many struggle to find a job with their degree upon graduation is they have studied something useless for 3 years and should have done something more worthwhile with their time. .
    Exactly .. many courses are not fit for purpose.

    Many lecturers are not qualified to teach some of the subjects.
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    University does not exist to get you a job. That is not it's purpose.

    Ergo, no.
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    (Original post by DeeStudent)
    Based on my own experience and those of friend's and family, most Universities teach you very little of the skills that employers want in their future employees.

    And once you graduate they don't really care what happens to you, because they already took your money.

    So this is my suggestion. The government should force all universities to provide students match making services with prospective employers and if they haven't been able to place a willing student with a job that pays at least the average entry level wage for their sector of study within 18 months of graduation they must pay the student a 30% refund on their entire course.

    I think once the Universities are faced with the prospect of having to refund students the quality of the courses will go through the roof.

    Also league tables can be kept which help new students see which Universities do the most to help people get decent jobs and how quickly.
    Well, technically speaking, you essentially get away with university for free if you don't get a job. You only start paying university back in England if you earn over a certain threshold (i think its 20k iirc), and any income above that is taxed at around 10% to pay off your student debt. Thus, if you can't get a job, you never have to pay for your education, because it hasn't benefited you. i.e. you already get a 100% discount if you don't get a job.
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    Universities give you the knowledge required to obtain a degree in a specific subject area, and even then you have to do most of the work yourself. But that's the point, you can't expect to be spoon fed like at school because you're an adult and have to take responsibility and also put your own effort in. It's not just knowledge that enables a graduate to get a job, either, most jobs ask for some kind of work experience related to that field in the very least and that's down to the person themselves finding some. There's also things like interview techniques and being able to write a decent CV, which aren't the university's responsibility to teach you.
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    If you choose to study a degree, you are doing that to learn the subject and how to do good research, not just necessarily to have a good job. Getting a good graduate job takes way more effort than just gaining a degree: work experience, voluntary experience, internships, a good personality etc.
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    I think the university should loose funding in the next round of negotiations, but not refunds.

    Alot of universities lie and exaggerate the employability of their courses. Lecturers who dont provide solutions to tutorials etc

    George Osborne uncapped student numbers, so now there is no incentive to maintain quality, its just about quantity
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    (Original post by DeeStudent)
    The government should force all universities to provide students match making services with prospective employers and if they haven't been able to place a willing student with a job that pays at least the average entry level wage for their sector of study within 18 months of graduation they must pay the student a 30% refund on their entire course.
    Why is this the universities responsibility? University is there as an education tool and even then it still requires a lot of effort on the part of the student. It is not there to mollycoddle you, nor is it there to encourage you to pay for a handout. It is also not up to the university whether there are jobs available, or whether the student is a good candidate and so on.

    Simply being willing is not enough. A perfectly willing student can still graduate with a 2:2 which hinders them from getting a job. A willing student can take a degree in an industry that is oversaturated. Universities cannot control this. If a student is unable to get a job, that does not mean that the university is entirely at fault.

    Rather than trying to get the university to hand you a job, you focus on working for it yourself. If you think the problem is that universities don't teach the right skills, address that problem instead. If you think you aren't learning the right things, put the effort in yourself and learn it.

    This is a good example of entitlement. Going to uni does not mean you are entitled to a job. Not getting a job does not mean you are entitled to a refund. You were never promised a job. If you don't think you have the right skills, stop expecting someone else to deal with the problem and go learn whatever you need for yourself.
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    What a stupid suggestion. This thread should have remained buried.
 
 
 

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