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    I want a career within IT or Computer Technology as I’ve studied Computer Science at GCSE and A level and they have always been my main interests since I was young. However, I don’t like the idea of going to university full time, and was wondering if an apprenticeship hopefully leading to a higher degree apprenticeship would still be able to make me get into a good field of work in the industry. I know with degree apprenticeships I can get the skills needed for the technical side aswell as the theory from the few days I’m at uni studying, so figured this would be a good option, however I didn’t know if employers would treat this in the same way as a university degree. Any thoughts or ideas would be much appreciated! Thank you! Xx
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    I'm a Software Engineer without a degree (Just the first 2 years of a degree and a 12-month industrial placement). That hasn't been a problem for me so far

    he only other thing I had which worked to my advantage was having taught myself C++ when I was 13; it was one of my main hobbies growing up before taking Computing at A-Level or starting Uni (which I later dropped after the placement year). I've been asked a bunch of times in interviews about why I quit the degree, but my honest answer to that question is always that I didn't think it mattered, and I haven't been proven wrong yet

    For programming jobs at least, I tend to think of a degree is just one possible way to demonstrate a background in the kinds of skills you need to be good at to cope with that sort of job. The types of people who normally interview you and make the decision are usually the other Tech geeks at the company who you'd be working with anyway, who might not even have a degree themselves, or who did their degree so long ago that they don't care much about that sort of thing.

    For any engineering-based technical career paths in IT and Computing (Programming, Systems Engineering, Networking, etc.), employers value people who can prove that they have strong technical, analytical and problem-solving skills, as well as having a knack for learning about new technologies, being enthusiastic about their career, having good inter-personal communication skills, and having the potential to grow and advance to a more senior level later in your career.

    Whether you have a degree or not, your chances at being offered a job depend on you being able to walk into an interview and convince them that you fit that description - you'll likely be grilled over any experience you have, asked to take technical tests or logical-thinking tests, possibly asked to talk through some kind of project you've worked on which demonstrates your skills, then probed for your understanding on typical technical subjects by being asked how you'd solve a difficult problem, or to explain some concept in-depth to the interviewer.
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    (Original post by winterscoming)
    I'm a Software Engineer without a degree (Just the first 2 years of a degree and a 12-month industrial placement). That hasn't been a problem for me so far

    he only other thing I had which worked to my advantage was having taught myself C++ when I was 13; it was one of my main hobbies growing up before taking Computing at A-Level or starting Uni (which I later dropped after the placement year). I've been asked a bunch of times in interviews about why I quit the degree, but my honest answer to that question is always that I didn't think it mattered, and I haven't been proven wrong yet

    For programming jobs at least, I tend to think of a degree is just one possible way to demonstrate a background in the kinds of skills you need to be good at to cope with that sort of job. The types of people who normally interview you and make the decision are usually the other Tech geeks at the company who you'd be wIorking with anyway, who might not even have a degree themselves, or who did their degree so long ago that they don't care much about that sort of thing.

    For any engineering-based technical career paths in IT and Computing (Programming, Systems Engineering, Networking, etc.), employers value people who can prove that they have strong technical, analytical and problem-solving skills, as well as having a knack for learning about new technologies, being enthusiastic about their career, having good inter-personal communication skills, and having the potential to grow and advance to a more senior level later in your career.

    Whether you have a degree or not, your chances at being offered a job depend on you being able to walk into an interview and convince them that you fit that description - you'll likely be grilled over any experience you have, asked to take technical tests or logical-thinking tests, possibly asked to talk through some kind of project you've worked on which demonstrates your skills, then probed for your understanding on typical technical subjects by being asked how you'd solve a difficult problem, or to explain some concept in-depth to the interviewer.
    I'm going to uni next year to study Cyber security, what programming languages do you think would be useful for me to get familiar with and/ o learn?
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    (Original post by pizzalover101)
    I'm going to uni next year to study Cyber security, what programming languages do you think would be useful for me to get familiar with and/ o learn?
    To be honest, whichever one your university is going to teach you would be the best one to get ahead in, because it'll probably be the one which a lot of your coursework will be in Do you know where you're likely to be studying, and whether their website gives you any particular indication about which language you're most likely to be using?

    A Cyber Security degree is probably going to be a variant of a CompSci degree anyway - at least the first year of computing-related degrees are often similar to each other.

    Also, have you studied CompSci at A-Level? I think most A-Levels use Java now, so if that's the language you've used and you're not sure what you might be asked to study at Uni, then I would focus on improving your skills on that one, since the A-Level itself ought to put you in a good position. (and a lot of Universities carry on with Java anyway..). Being familiar with any language in The "C" family (Java, Python, C#, C++ or C itself) will make it a bit easier to learn any of the others - I don't know of any Uni who doesn't teach at least one of those in a Computing-related degree

    If you're starting out from a base of having no previous Computer Science knowledge, then this one might interest you - it'll get you ahead in a lot of the skills you'd need in the first year (General intro-CompSci course by Harvard teaching staff, but includes a lot of C programming as a means to teach those skills as well as problem solving): https://www.edx.org/course/cs50s-int...harvardx-cs50x
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    (Original post by pizzalover101)
    I'm going to uni next year to study Cyber security, what programming languages do you think would be useful for me to get familiar with and/ o learn?
    I have a Masters in Cyber Security and to be honest, you won't learn much coding on many Cyber Security courses. You will have to know some code though. While malware could be written in any language, the main languages you'll come across are:

    Assembly/C: Most serious malware is written in an assembly language or in C due to being low level programming languages.

    Python: This is the language of choice for writing scripts to automate mundane security tasks.

    POSH/BASH: Pretty important to be able to navigate an OS throughly in Cyber Security.

    JavaScript: XSS vulnerabilities are common attack surfaces for hackers, so knowing JavaScript is useful to mitigate against this.

    If you want to talk about this a bit more it might be worth starting a new thread about it or looking up some other related threads.
 
 
 
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