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    From everything that I've seen/read, medicine has become a tough to work in. Doctors are putting in far too much effort and time, and getting very little in return.

    The government and the GMC are our adversaries, the BMA is too weak of a lobby to advocate for us, and the NHS is underfunded and we're being forced to accept things as they are.

    I'm a third year who has yet to start clinicals, and I don't even know if this is worth it anymore. It seems like everything that made this career so rewarding has disappeared.

    I have a two fall-back plans for myself, I just want some perspective on how feasible they are:

    1) Training in a different country:
    • Australia or New Zealand: how would I go about this? Can I go straight in after my medical degree?
    • USA: I know how to go through this process, and doing all the usmle exams will take the life out of me, but I'm willing to do it if that's what it takes. I also know that its an uphill battle despite having a UK medical degree.

    2) Using my degree in the private sector; this could be from anything ranging from pharmaceuticals to law to consulting. The thing is, if I go this route, I need to know if my degree will be held in high regard, and hence be able to propel me to very high positions. I wouldn't see it feasible if I end up stuck in middle-management.

    Let me know what you all think. I appreciate any and all forms of advice.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    From everything that I've seen/read, medicine has become a tough to work in. Doctors are putting in far too much effort and time, and getting very little in return.

    The government and the GMC are our adversaries, the BMA is too weak of a lobby to advocate for us, and the NHS is underfunded and we're being forced to accept things as they are.

    I'm a third year who has yet to start clinicals, and I don't even know if this is worth it anymore. It seems like everything that made this career so rewarding has disappeared.

    I have a two fall-back plans for myself, I just want some perspective on how feasible they are:

    1) Training in a different country:
    • Australia or New Zealand: how would I go about this? Can I go straight in after my medical degree?
    • USA: I know how to go through this process, and doing all the usmle exams will take the life out of me, but I'm willing to do it if that's what it takes. I also know that its an uphill battle despite having a UK medical degree.

    2) Using my degree in the private sector; this could be from anything ranging from pharmaceuticals to law to consulting. The thing is, if I go this route, I need to know if my degree will be held in high regard, and hence be able to propel me to very high positions. I wouldn't see it feasible if I end up stuck in middle-management.

    Let me know what you all think. I appreciate any and all forms of advice.
    I am sorry you are feeling like this. Perhaps once you have started clinicals your feeling will change and you will rediscover the reasons why you have applied to do medicine the first place.
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    (Original post by ecolier)
    I am sorry you are feeling like this. Perhaps once you have started clinicals your feeling will change and you will rediscover the reasons why you have applied to do medicine the first place.
    Thanks. The demotivation won't affect my grades, but I feel shaky about my future.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Thanks. The demotivation won't affect my grades, but I feel shaky about my future.
    Everyone's in the same boat. Get through it, then re-evaluate your option in a few years' time!
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    Australia is a fantastic place to live and practise medicine. But the grass isnt always greener. Their training fees are extortionate, their union is much like the BMA, many of their training programs run their doctors into the ground, rates of burnout and suicide [anecdotally] are higher etc etc. The best time to go is after f2

    Keeping your options open E.g. doing usmle if you're serious about it can be potentially a very rewarding venture. But just be careful about making too many rash decisions (doesn't sound like you will !) without having a proper taste of it here
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    From everything that I've seen/read, medicine has become a tough to work in. Doctors are putting in far too much effort and time, and getting very little in return.

    The government and the GMC are our adversaries, the BMA is too weak of a lobby to advocate for us, and the NHS is underfunded and we're being forced to accept things as they are.

    I'm a third year who has yet to start clinicals, and I don't even know if this is worth it anymore. It seems like everything that made this career so rewarding has disappeared.

    I have a two fall-back plans for myself, I just want some perspective on how feasible they are:

    1) Training in a different country:
    • Australia or New Zealand: how would I go about this? Can I go straight in after my medical degree?
    • USA: I know how to go through this process, and doing all the usmle exams will take the life out of me, but I'm willing to do it if that's what it takes. I also know that its an uphill battle despite having a UK medical degree.

    2) Using my degree in the private sector; this could be from anything ranging from pharmaceuticals to law to consulting. The thing is, if I go this route, I need to know if my degree will be held in high regard, and hence be able to propel me to very high positions. I wouldn't see it feasible if I end up stuck in middle-management.

    Let me know what you all think. I appreciate any and all forms of advice.
    3rd year who is yet to start clinicals...are you Notts student by any chance?

    As to your question, I can't tell much about Australia but I know USA isn't as nice as it seems. Even if you do get into training there, their working hours are longer and their medical protection/insurance fees are much higher too. You would also be leaving your family behind and moving to a country that itself doesn't seem that great with their guns, obese population etc.

    Have you considered Germany? It's one of the best places to train as a doctor currently. All you would need to do is get your German to B2 level which you could learn during your foundation posts as it shouldn't be much harder than revising for MRCP (what other juniors will most likely be doing).
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    (Original post by Nottie)
    3rd year who is yet to start clinicals...are you Notts student by any chance?

    As to your question, I can't tell much about Australia but I know USA isn't as nice as it seems. Even if you do get into training there, their working hours are longer and their medical protection/insurance fees are much higher too. You would also be leaving your family behind and moving to a country that itself doesn't seem that great with their guns, obese population etc.

    Have you considered Germany? It's one of the best places to train as a doctor currently. All you would need to do is get your German to B2 level which you could learn during your foundation posts as it shouldn't be much harder than revising for MRCP (what other juniors will most likely be doing).
    Strange, I've always read that trainees in the US get legal and medical insurance provided for them?

    Not too sure I'd be comfortable with Germany to be honest. I would personally have to be fluent just to feel competent enough talking to patients.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Strange, I've always read that trainees in the US get legal and medical insurance provided for them?

    Not too sure I'd be comfortable with Germany to be honest. I would personally have to be fluent just to feel competent enough talking to patients.
    tbh psych registrar told me all that stuff about US as he was strongly considering it in the past. We talked more about consultant posts though.

    What about Malta?
 
 
 

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