Maths&physics
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
a bit of a ditsy question, as perusal but f = f(t)

so, thats force in terms of t, as opposed to lets say, f = ma?

basically, another way of finding force, but instead of ma, we're using time?
0
reply
have
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
(Original post by Maths&physics)
a bit of a ditsy question, as perusal but f = f(t)

so, thats force in terms of t, as opposed to lets say, f = ma?

basically, another way of finding force, but instead of ma, we're using time?
They're not opposed to each other. It's not one or the other. F=ma is a law of newtonian mechanics. It's true always. Always. Writing F(t) = ...... is just a way to describe the force at different times.
If you're given time, you can plug that into the F(t) to find the force at that time.

These aren't the only two ways you can find the Force acting. You know many more. Using the fact that the system may be in equilibrium, and therefore resolving force to 0, resolving total moment to 0. Using Ft = change in p. etc. etc.
0
reply
Maths&physics
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#3
(Original post by StayWoke)
They're not opposed to each other. It's not one or the other. F=ma is a law of newtonian mechanics. It's true always. Always. Writing F(t) = ...... is just a way to describe the force at different times.
If you're given time, you can plug that into the F(t) to find the force at that time.

These aren't the only two ways you can find the Force acting. You know many more. Using the fact that the system may be in equilibrium, and therefore resolving force to 0, resolving total moment to 0. Using Ft = change in p. etc. etc.

Sorry, I should have said instead of, instead of opposed.


Cool. That makes way more sense! Thank you!
0
reply
RDKGames
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 years ago
#4
(Original post by Maths&physics)
a bit of a ditsy question, as perusal but f = f(t)

so, thats force in terms of t, as opposed to lets say, f = ma?

basically, another way of finding force, but instead of ma, we're using time?
Well, most commonly a=a(t) so really, they're not so different since F(t) = ma(t) - both sides are functions of time.
0
reply
Maths&physics
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#5
(Original post by RDKGames)
Well, most commonly a=a(t) so really, they're not so different since F(t) = ma(t) - both sides are functions of time.
What is a=a(t) an expression of - what is it describing?

It’s like: x=x(t)
x = t^2 -2t could be an equation?
0
reply
RDKGames
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#6
Report 2 years ago
#6
(Original post by Maths&physics)
What is a=a(t) an expression of - what is it describing?

It’s like: x=x(t)
x = t^2 -2t could be an equation?
a is acceleration.

Not sure what you're talking about about with x=t^2-2t, it is an equation. x is expressed in terms of time here therefore it is a function of time, ie x(t)
0
reply
Maths&physics
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#7
(Original post by RDKGames)
a is acceleration.

Not sure what you're talking about about with x=t^2-2t, it is an equation. x is expressed in terms of time here therefore it is a function of time, ie x(t)
so, x=t^2-2t is an example of x=x(t)

its just expressing x in terms of t?

would would the original example look like: F=f(t)
0
reply
RDKGames
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#8
Report 2 years ago
#8
(Original post by Maths&physics)
so, x=t^2-2t is an example of x=x(t)

its just expressing x in terms of t?

would would the original example look like: F=f(t)
All you need to know about x(t) is that it just means x is dependent only on the variable t.
0
reply
Maths&physics
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#9
(Original post by RDKGames)
All you need to know about x(t) is that it just means x is dependent only on the variable t.
Thanks
0
reply
Maths&physics
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#10
(Original post by RDKGames)
All you need to know about x(t) is that it just means x is dependent only on the variable t.
one last thing. when F=f(t), this is a variable force: as in the force changes depending on the moment in time?
0
reply
RDKGames
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#11
Report 2 years ago
#11
(Original post by Maths&physics)
one last tung. when F=f(t), this is a veritable farce, as in the force changes depending on the moment in time?
Yes this means the force* varies depending on time.
0
reply
Maths&physics
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#12
(Original post by RDKGames)
Yes this means the force* varies depending on time.
thanks.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Current uni students - are you thinking of dropping out of university?

Yes, I'm seriously considering dropping out (81)
14.21%
I'm not sure (26)
4.56%
No, I'm going to stick it out for now (181)
31.75%
I have already dropped out (12)
2.11%
I'm not a current university student (270)
47.37%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed