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is there any point of studying if your becoming a housewife watch

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    I’m currently doing my GCSE’s. but after I do my GCSEs I want to stop studying. I don’t see the point in studying if I’m going to become a Housewife/homemaker/stay-at-home mother etc. is there any point of studying if your becoming a housewife? Should I stop studying or should I continue? Or should I not even do my GCSEs at all?
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    Legally, you have to stay in education until the age of 18 in the UK whether you want to or not
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    Have some ambition please!
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    Well, I admire your confidence in finding someone who's willing to pay your way, but in the current climate it's becoming increasingly rare for only one party to be working.
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    (Original post by hamna903)
    I’m currently doing my GCSE’s. but after I do my GCSEs I want to stop studying. I don’t see the point in studying if I’m going to become a Housewife/homemaker/stay-at-home mother etc. is there any point of studying if your becoming a housewife? Should I stop studying or should I continue? Or should I not even do my GCSEs at all?
    Due to law, you have to remain in education until you are 18. Regardless of what you want to do in the future, it is the law. Also, staying in education until then will prove useful should you ever change your mind regarding your future
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    well do you want to become a housewife? i'm not here to tell you what to do but i think you are gonna regret it down the line. why dont you just become an independent financially stable women instead of relying on man who might leave you at some point. you just dont wanna take that risk. getting an education is the best thing you can do for yourself. so please do continue you with your education, you just don't want to regret it. trust me.
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    Finding a husband that will be able to support the family on one income might be harder than you think. You need to be able to support yourself in the time before you marry and possibly need to work to support the household once you have married. It’s not the 20th century anymore, you can’t blindly rely on a man to swoop in and take care of you forever.

    You legally have to stay in education until 18 anyway, do your best and you can decide to leave education once you’re old enough! Better to have the qualifications and not need them than to skip them and struggle to get a job later in life.
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    Why would you want to strive to be someone that just facilitates someone else's life (ie. your future husband). You have all these opportunities and resources surrounding you to enable you to build your life to absolutely anything you want it to be and you strive to be a housewife? Is it coz you can't be bothered? Education is only around 25 years of your life more or less. The rest of your time on this earth is much longer then that...and i don't know about you but i wouldn't want to spend that next 60 years or more pissing and prancing around at home, sweeping the floor. What a pointless life that would be. I'd rather be dead.
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    and they talk about inequality...
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    (Original post by hamna903)
    I’m currently doing my GCSE’s. but after I do my GCSEs I want to stop studying. I don’t see the point in studying if I’m going to become a Housewife/homemaker/stay-at-home mother etc. is there any point of studying if your becoming a housewife? Should I stop studying or should I continue? Or should I not even do my GCSEs at all?
    Let me tell you one thing. Not being independent is the worse. In the future if you get bored of being a housewife which you will, you will want to pursue a job but you won’t be qualified unless you’re applying for fast-food shops or retail.

    Depending on someone means you let them have some kind of power of you, because they provide you and facilitate you.

    In the end no relationship is perfect and if it comes to an end, you might want to be financially stable and qualified to look after yourself and if you do kids then depending on another person is **** because that person can dictate your choice on money etc because most people feel like they have an ownership of it because they earned it which means financial problems in the future can also cause problems in your relationship and you’ll find yourself stuck in this hole unable to get out because you don’t have the stairs to get out.
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    How can you be so sure you're going to be a housewife for the rest of your life? You have to stay in education until you're 18 and you may have a change of heart when you're older, so having GCSEs may help you.
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    Becoming a housewife isn't the end of it all. I became a graduate, a career bunny, a mum, a housewife, then did a Masters, a PhD and started a whole new career. Believe me: the joys of daytime tv, 3 daily washing machine cycles, a couple of dishwasher cycles, buying the groceries, cooking, tidying up and getting the kids to and from school...it's not enough to keep anyone genuinely happy.
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    (Original post by hamna903)
    I’m currently doing my GCSE’s. but after I do my GCSEs I want to stop studying. I don’t see the point in studying if I’m going to become a Housewife/homemaker/stay-at-home mother etc. is there any point of studying if your becoming a housewife? Should I stop studying or should I continue? Or should I not even do my GCSEs at all?
    Have a back up.


    My mum is practically a housewife but still went to Cambridge
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    (Original post by hamna903)
    I’m currently doing my GCSE’s. but after I do my GCSEs I want to stop studying. I don’t see the point in studying if I’m going to become a Housewife/homemaker/stay-at-home mother etc. is there any point of studying if your becoming a housewife? Should I stop studying or should I continue? Or should I not even do my GCSEs at all?
    You're*

    I'm sorry to say it but I think you should continue your studies

    Besides, do you not have any crazy dreams? Career goals? Anything you want to achieve/experience before you settle down?

    I know a few people who dropped out of school and are now regretting it in their 20s. It just makes everything harder for you in the future. They get by, but it's slowing them down as they are realising what their passion is later on in life, meaning they need to re-do exams, or they need higher education to follow their passion etc. whilst working a *****y minimum wage job.

    Try and imagine your life 5-10 years from now. How do you know you'll be a housewife? Education will give you basic skills you may need to fall back on in hard times.
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    Your husband would need to be financially stable to support the family on his own. Not being able to support yourself also opens up the relationship to abuse as you will be dependent on him and may feel unable to leave the relationship.
    I'd advise you to try and pass at least 5 GCSEs as this is all that's needed for minimum wage jobs.
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    Firstly you have to be in education or training until 18 so you have to continue for now. Other than that if you don't want to go to uni don't but you will probably get bored is you don't do anything with your life, unlikely you get married any time soon lets be honest let alone have children
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    Honestly, yes. There's good reasons to carry on studying. You never know when circumstances change. Trust me
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    The lack of ambition in the OP is so painful to read.
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    1. Even if you do find someone willing to support you etc, do you not want to provide the best version of yourself that you can be to your future children?

    2. The less you earn/work, the more your partner will have to work to make up for it. And that will mean less time for him to spend time with his children, huge financial pressure/stress on him to support everyone, less financial security and less money to go around for everyone in generaI (meaning that your kids could miss out on things like having a better education or seeing much of their dad).

    3. If you slack off now, you will only be shooting yourself in the foot. There is absolutely no guarantee that you will find someone willing to support you, and then what? Will you really be content doing menial jobs for the rest of your life?

    It's a lot harder to return back to education than it is to stay in it and complete it well the first time round (and if the need did call for it, you may not find yourself in a fortunate enough position at that precise moment for returning back to education to be a viable option).

    It's not a crime to not have grand ambitions in life, however you should at least try to live in a way that gives you some decent security and life prospects. Don't entrap or limit yourself for no better reason that a past desire to slack off when you were young!
    There are not always going to be people with a will or means to look after you in life.
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    Children's academic attainment correlates with the mother/primary carer's education, so yes, if you want your future children to be smart, you should get smart, too.
 
 
 
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