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    Hi,

    I need some major advice. Im not looking to be told its completely impossible, rather advice about how I might achieve my goals.

    I have an integrated master in chemistry (MChem), however, I only achive a 2:2. Since then I have become a secondary science teacher. I am wanted to go back to academia. I am aware that with my grade, it is extremely unlikely I would be able to get accepted onto a PhD.

    To that extent I am consdiering applying for a master programme.

    There are several questions I have. Would getting a masters help my application for PhD? Or would my original degree prevent me completely? Is it even possible for me to do a master when I already have an integrated masters? If I can could I get funding for it? Is there anyone I could speak to get advice from?

    Regards

    John
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    (Original post by johnca502)
    Hi,

    I need some major advice. Im not looking to be told its completely impossible, rather advice about how I might achieve my goals.

    I have an integrated master in chemistry (MChem), however, I only achive a 2:2. Since then I have become a secondary science teacher. I am wanted to go back to academia. I am aware that with my grade, it is extremely unlikely I would be able to get accepted onto a PhD.

    To that extent I am consdiering applying for a master programme.

    There are several questions I have. Would getting a masters help my application for PhD? Or would my original degree prevent me completely? Is it even possible for me to do a master when I already have an integrated masters? If I can could I get funding for it? Is there anyone I could speak to get advice from?

    Regards

    John
    It might but you may get questions about why a second masters. I'm not sure about eligibility for a postgrad loan as I think one of the requirements is that you don't already have the same level of qualification in the field. You can do a PhD but you may not get funding.
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    Hey John,

    I found a thread from 2016 asking a similar question - unfortunately, it looks like you would be ineligible for a government funded Masters Loan, as you already hold an equivalent level qualification (MChem). However, other funding options exist but it is very much dependent on where you live, and which course you wish to study. UCAS have some useful information on this here.

    In terms of applying for a Masters with an integrated degree: whilst you have a Masters degree rather than a Bachelors, you still completed the undergraduate credits in your first 3 years. If you do go ahead and apply for another Masters, this is something you should clarify with each university you apply to - some may be happy with this, whilst others may not.

    Fred - UEA PG Rep
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    Thank you for your answer. That link was realy useful.

    A follow up question if you dont mind. But I graduated in 2011. Do you think this will hinder any applications.

    Reagrds

    John

    (Original post by University of East Anglia PG Student Rep)
    Hey John,

    I found a thread from 2016 asking a similar question - unfortunately, it looks like you would be ineligible for a government funded Masters Loan, as you already hold an equivalent level qualification (MChem). However, other funding options exist but it is very much dependent on where you live, and which course you wish to study. UCAS have some useful information on this here.

    In terms of applying for a Masters with an integrated degree: whilst you have a Masters degree rather than a Bachelors, you still completed the undergraduate credits in your first 3 years. If you do go ahead and apply for another Masters, this is something you should clarify with each university you apply to - some may be happy with this, whilst others may not.

    Fred - UEA PG Rep
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    (Original post by johnca502)
    Thank you for your answer. That link was realy useful.

    A follow up question if you dont mind. But I graduated in 2011. Do you think this will hinder any applications.

    Reagrds

    John
    Hey again,

    Taking years out between studying degrees shouldn't be a barrier to studying a Master's. Many people return to study after working for a number of years, just like you have. UEA has a really positive approach to mature students which I think you'd be interested in - take a look here.

    I found a great web page titled 'Master's: Now or Later?' which briefly looks at the benefits of studying a Master's later in your academic life. If you're looking at returning to study something scientific, perhaps your time spent teaching science could strengthen your application.

    Let me know if you have any more questions

    Fred - UEA PG Rep
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    (Original post by johnca502)
    Thank you for your answer. That link was realy useful.

    A follow up question if you dont mind. But I graduated in 2011. Do you think this will hinder any applications.

    Reagrds

    John
    I graduated in 1994, and did a Master's in 2016-17. I am also hoping to start a PhD in September, if the funding application gets through.

    Experience is always good, and I don't think age or the length of time out of education are barriers to post-grad study.
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    To be honest I'm surprised you can't get on a PhD especially in chemistry or physics. I'm sure if you "shop around" and email / phone course tutors, then they will give you the benefit of doubt. In fact i'm certain of it. The only question I would have is could you get funding, as that will likely come from another source and not the university.

    The one question I would ask though is why do you want to do a PhD? In my opinion a PhD is a waste of time and will leave you unemployed after your course / post-doc finishes.
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    (Original post by thenoob2018)
    In my opinion a PhD is a waste of time
    Big statement. Care to justify it?
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    (Original post by worldender)
    Big statement. Care to justify it?
    I know, but I wouldn't say it if I didn't mean it. Physics and chemistry has a glut of PhD graduates. Only the best will get an academic position and there are very few of those jobs anyway. You might get 'lucky' and work in industry, but the pay and job security isn't worth all those years of studying. I did my undergrad project in materials science and both of my supervisors wanted to leave academia. Their primary goal was to publish (pretty meaningless) work in order to secure more grants for the department so they could keep their jobs. Go on the physics forums and elsewhere... there are countless stories of people with PhDs in particle or nuclear physics who left to work in insurance. Look at Dr Philip Elliott - PhD in physics and worked in a call centre before he ended his life (RIP).
 
 
 
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