Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Hello everyone,
    I am intending to apply for medicine, however i have reached a point of utter confusion. I am the eldest so my parents do not know much about university applications.
    My question is that, when do i need to apply to University for medicine? (as in which year, month and when do i take my UKCAT exam ect...) As i am currently in year 12 and i am doing chem, bio, english lit and EPQ. Furthermore, what uni accept a C in gcse maths?
    PLEASE any help would be very very much appreciated, as i am going through a lot of stress and depression.
    Thank you guys.
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by sally120)
    Hello everyone,
    I am intending to apply for medicine, however i have reached a point of utter confusion. I am the eldest so my parents do not know much about university applications.
    My question is that, when do i need to apply to University for medicine? (as in which year, month and when do i take my UKCAT exam ect...)
    15th October every year, for admissions the next year. I.e. for 2018 entry you would have needed to apply 15/10/2017 for guaranteed consideration. You can submit later but it may well not be considered.

    For 2019 entry (in your case), you will need to finalise everything by 15th October this year.

    The UKCAT runs from July to early October. See https://www.ukcat.ac.uk/ukcat-test/u...ates-and-fees/

    As i am currently in year 12 and i am doing chem, bio, english lit and EPQ. Furthermore, what uni accept a C in gcse maths?
    You will need to research it yourself - but you probably will need to apply to the non "GCSE-heavy" universities. There will be more information on the Medicine Forum.

    PLEASE any help would be very very much appreciated, as i am going through a lot of stress and depression.
    Thank you guys.
    :yy: Feel free to ask me any further questions. I was in your shoes once with no one to ask (I came from a family without any medics!)
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    hello ecolier,
    Oh thank you so much, so just to confirm, i need to apply to my selected universities by 15th October this year and i need to take the UKCAT this year? Also i have no experience in hospital as im 17 and hospitals allow 18 and over? Please help?
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by sally120)
    hello ecolier,
    Oh thank you so much, so just to confirm, i need to apply to my selected universities by 15th October this year
    Yes, for 2019 entry.

    and i need to take the UKCAT this year?
    Yes, also for 2019 entry.

    Also i have no experience in hospital as im 17 and hospitals allow 18 and over? Please help?
    That's not true - who's told you that?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    I looked on the website for hospitals and their work experience, and it said you need to be 18 or over
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by sally120)
    I looked on the website for hospitals and their work experience, and it said you need to be 18 or over
    Which one is that? (PM me if you don't want to say it in public)

    I know for sure that's not the case - because I had work experience aged 17!! Plus the medical school that I help with offers taster courses for students in AS and A2. They would not have reached 18 years old yet.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    also E colier, i have researched soooo much but i am not able to find any non gcse heavy unis
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    It's nice to see a prospective medic with the same a levels Also as ecolia Has rightly Said, you do not Need To Be 18 To Get Hospital Work Experience !
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    okay that is lovely!! what is the medical school that you help with, i would really appreciate doing that course!!
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by sally120)
    also E colier, i have researched soooo much but i am not able to find any non gcse heavy unis
    Have you looked on here? (Sorry about the formatting)
    https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/res...e-requirements

    (Original post by sally120)
    okay that is lovely!! what is the medical school that you help with, i would really appreciate doing that course!!
    I don't want to reveal where I teach in the public. PM me if you have any further questions
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by futuremedic34)
    It's nice to see a prospective medic with the same a levels Also as ecolia Has rightly Said, you do not Need To Be 18 To Get Hospital Work Experience !
    yes same!!! wow i did not know that!!! great!! could i ask you if you know of any non gcse heavy universities?? as i have a C in maths and that is my onlyyyy issue
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    If you have a C in maths you have to make sure all your university options are smart. Do research and email universities that arent very clear about their admissions policy. for example bristol explicitly say you need an A in maths to apply.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Workgrind247)
    If you have a C in maths you have to make sure all your university options are smart. Do research and email universities that arent very clear about their admissions policy. for example bristol explicitly say you need an A in maths to apply.
    Ahhh okay thank you, but i have researched soooooo much and no luck
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sally120)
    Ahhh okay thank you, but i have researched soooooo much and no luck
    you could ask to be re-entered into maths at your school. again you'd have to check uni policy on resits and mitigating circumstances
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    sally120 – before you get too far into this I think the C-grade for maths could be a problem but I’m not sure - both my daughters studied medicine at Leeds - one is intercalating atm (i.e. taking a year out between years 3 and 4 to study another degree subject for 1 year, something she was particularly interested in); the other graduated in June 2017 and is now working at an F1 (1st year of two years of foundation training) in a hospital – she will do 3 rotations (i.e. work in different roles) in each of those 2 foundation years – she’s been in an adult psychiatric ward and is now in upper gastro (intestinal surgery), I’m not sure where she’ll be off to after that. She did the BMAT. Both had to do the UKCAT – Leeds didn’t ask for BMAT at the time they started but they are now. From what I recall - Birmingham were looking closely at the number of GCSE A-grades (I think they wanted 6-7 and they may well have specified something for maths and probably english). I think it has now become more common for universities to look at GCSE grades for applicants for medicine.

    I think you might be looking at work experience in the health care system in a very narrow way - experience in a hospital is secondary care (a care home is also secondary) - as a minimum you need to understand that there is primary(GP,pharmacy, dentistry) and tertiary care (specialist surgery) - you could gain useful experience in any of these areas (and other areas I'll mention below) but more importantly, insight into the field of health care. TBH it sounds to me like you have left your decision to try for medicine quite late. It could well be that, without the right input from your family and your school, you have not realised how difficult and important it is to arrange some kind of useful work experience - you want the experience to help understand what you might be getting in to and whether you can see yourself working in some part of the health service. You also want to be able to talk about what you have learned or understood from those experiences - both face-to-face at interview (if you are lucky enough to get that far) and in your personal statement. Sorting out work experience in a hospital is difficult – you are going to have to keep ringing, asking and pestering to get anything sorted out – it can take many months to arrange. From what my daughters have said, some people didn’t have huge amounts of work experience – surprisingly little from some of the stories I’ve heard. My daughters did quite a lot but don’t but put off by what I’m going to list. Between them they helped other children with homework at an after-school club – that’s working with younger children, they worked with a local charity that runs a club 1 night a week for children and young adults with a range of mental, physical, behavioural and social difficulties – they also helped out at a 4-week summer school (my younger daughter did this as a volunteer/helper for 3-4 years then took over the role of running the summer school herself – even though she is at uni she still gives up most of her summer to do this), both managed to organise a week (or the best part of a week) working in pathology - it consists of many different departments/labs (histology, virology, microbiology, etc – they both got some experience in microbiology), one did get some time on a renal unit. One also volunteered at a care home – most Wednesday afternoon’s for 2 years. One also had the offer of some experience at a GP surgery but, in the end, didn’t take up the offer because of the cost of having to live away from home for a week. The work at the care home was. IMHO, the most important – I would recommend that as something to look at. You only have 4000 characters for your statement so you can’t possibly write about everything – the art is to distil the experiences down into something powerful, very definitely personal and insightful – it must say something about you and your personal response to what you have seen and understood – I think with the right kinds of experience you may not need to experience as much as my daughters did – obviously it helps to have a range of experiences to choose from but it seems to matter more how you communicate your experience in your statement – the mistake would be to simply list what you did, i.e. a worked for 2 weeks in a.... I remember one of my daughters saying things like – how, in the care home, she had seen exactly how a retired doctor, suffering from Parkinson’s, deteriorate over a period of a year that she had known him – or how the teenage lads at the club for young people really latched on to any male helpers – they were so desperate to spend time with them as most care workers/volunteers/helpers that they encounter are female – these are small personal insights that you can probably only make if you experience these things first hand and then go on to reflect deeply on what you have seen. In both the care home and the activity club they learned about a wide range of conditions and about treatment, medication, the tasks of supporting and caring, the practical and emotional problems the families encounter and the impact it can have on siblings, etc. You might also think about trying to arrange some experience in a laboratory at a university where they are doing medical research – not everyone that goes into medicine ends up as a GP or a in a hospital, a few (desperately few) end up working in research. No one in our family is a medic and my girls went to a regular comprehensive school. Both left with 2A* and an A. If you can’t hit those grades the chances are very slim that you find a place – rest assured that the people applying have some confidence they can get those kind of grades (I know 1 person who ended up with a B for something and she was turned down by her 1st choice – somewhere on the south coast but, by some miracle, was offered a place at (imho) a better uni – Edinburgh – she had some problematic family circumstances that genuinely affected her in the run up to her exams). A very large number of people accepted on to medicine already have first degrees – the number going straight from A-levels to a medical course is not as high as you might think – at Leeds *I think* (and I’m really not sure now of the figures my daughters have mentioned over the years) as many as 30% enter after a first degree – some transfer from another degree (I know 4 people – 1 from physics, 1 from biomedical science,1 from chemistry and 1 from pharmacology), other have worked in the health service (1 as a theatre nurse).

    You should not underestimate the preparation needed for the UKCAT and the (even more challenging) BMAT which even more universities are asking for - good scores could open up many possibilities - if you are serious about it then you really need to get cracking on practicing for them - they are not easy - practice will help a lot.

    I hope some of this is a help – it’s a very brave decision to even try for medicine – sadly it is massively over-subscribed and imho, there is almost no difference between many who get on a course to study medicine and those who don’t - you’ll know that many people apply several times – it’s very sad that so many talented people are unable to get places.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by zpa43d)
    sally120 – before you get too far into this I think the C-grade for maths could be a problem but I’m not sure - both my daughters studied medicine at Leeds - one is intercalating atm (i.e. taking a year out between years 3 and 4 to study another degree subject for 1 year, something she was particularly interested in); the other graduated in June 2017 and is now working at an F1 (1st year of two years of foundation training) in a hospital – she will do 3 rotations (i.e. work in different roles) in each of those 2 foundation years – she’s been in an adult psychiatric ward and is now in upper gastro (intestinal surgery), I’m not sure where she’ll be off to after that. She did the BMAT. Both had to do the UKCAT – Leeds didn’t ask for BMAT at the time they started but they are now. From what I recall - Birmingham were looking closely at the number of GCSE A-grades (I think they wanted 6-7 and they may well have specified something for maths and probably english). I think it has now become more common for universities to look at GCSE grades for applicants for medicine.

    I think you might be looking at work experience in the health care system in a very narrow way - experience in a hospital is secondary care (a care home is also secondary) - as a minimum you need to understand that there is primary(GP,pharmacy, dentistry) and tertiary care (specialist surgery) - you could gain useful experience in any of these areas (and other areas I'll mention below) but more importantly, insight into the field of health care. TBH it sounds to me like you have left your decision to try for medicine quite late. It could well be that, without the right input from your family and your school, you have not realised how difficult and important it is to arrange some kind of useful work experience - you want the experience to help understand what you might be getting in to and whether you can see yourself working in some part of the health service. You also want to be able to talk about what you have learned or understood from those experiences - both face-to-face at interview (if you are lucky enough to get that far) and in your personal statement. Sorting out work experience in a hospital is difficult – you are going to have to keep ringing, asking and pestering to get anything sorted out – it can take many months to arrange. From what my daughters have said, some people didn’t have huge amounts of work experience – surprisingly little from some of the stories I’ve heard. My daughters did quite a lot but don’t but put off by what I’m going to list. Between them they helped other children with homework at an after-school club – that’s working with younger children, they worked with a local charity that runs a club 1 night a week for children and young adults with a range of mental, physical, behavioural and social difficulties – they also helped out at a 4-week summer school (my younger daughter did this as a volunteer/helper for 3-4 years then took over the role of running the summer school herself – even though she is at uni she still gives up most of her summer to do this), both managed to organise a week (or the best part of a week) working in pathology - it consists of many different departments/labs (histology, virology, microbiology, etc – they both got some experience in microbiology), one did get some time on a renal unit. One also volunteered at a care home – most Wednesday afternoon’s for 2 years. One also had the offer of some experience at a GP surgery but, in the end, didn’t take up the offer because of the cost of having to live away from home for a week. The work at the care home was. IMHO, the most important – I would recommend that as something to look at. You only have 4000 characters for your statement so you can’t possibly write about everything – the art is to distil the experiences down into something powerful, very definitely personal and insightful – it must say something about you and your personal response to what you have seen and understood – I think with the right kinds of experience you may not need to experience as much as my daughters did – obviously it helps to have a range of experiences to choose from but it seems to matter more how you communicate your experience in your statement – the mistake would be to simply list what you did, i.e. a worked for 2 weeks in a.... I remember one of my daughters saying things like – how, in the care home, she had seen exactly how a retired doctor, suffering from Parkinson’s, deteriorate over a period of a year that she had known him – or how the teenage lads at the club for young people really latched on to any male helpers – they were so desperate to spend time with them as most care workers/volunteers/helpers that they encounter are female – these are small personal insights that you can probably only make if you experience these things first hand and then go on to reflect deeply on what you have seen. In both the care home and the activity club they learned about a wide range of conditions and about treatment, medication, the tasks of supporting and caring, the practical and emotional problems the families encounter and the impact it can have on siblings, etc. You might also think about trying to arrange some experience in a laboratory at a university where they are doing medical research – not everyone that goes into medicine ends up as a GP or a in a hospital, a few (desperately few) end up working in research. No one in our family is a medic and my girls went to a regular comprehensive school. Both left with 2A* and an A. If you can’t hit those grades the chances are very slim that you find a place – rest assured that the people applying have some confidence they can get those kind of grades (I know 1 person who ended up with a B for something and she was turned down by her 1st choice – somewhere on the south coast but, by some miracle, was offered a place at (imho) a better uni – Edinburgh – she had some problematic family circumstances that genuinely affected her in the run up to her exams). A very large number of people accepted on to medicine already have first degrees – the number going straight from A-levels to a medical course is not as high as you might think – at Leeds *I think* (and I’m really not sure now of the figures my daughters have mentioned over the years) as many as 30% enter after a first degree – some transfer from another degree (I know 4 people – 1 from physics, 1 from biomedical science,1 from chemistry and 1 from pharmacology), other have worked in the health service (1 as a theatre nurse).

    You should not underestimate the preparation needed for the UKCAT and the (even more challenging) BMAT which even more universities are asking for - good scores could open up many possibilities - if you are serious about it then you really need to get cracking on practicing for them - they are not easy - practice will help a lot.

    I hope some of this is a help – it’s a very brave decision to even try for medicine – sadly it is massively over-subscribed and imho, there is almost no difference between many who get on a course to study medicine and those who don’t - you’ll know that many people apply several times – it’s very sad that so many talented people are unable to get places.
    Wow!! Firstly thank you everrr so much for putting in so much effort to respond to my questions, it is really appreciated! You must be proud of your girls, they sound like they went through so much hard work and they really deserved it! Yes i am really ambitious to take on medicine at university level. Similarly, i have no medics in my family and me and my parents become so clueless to what step we need to take now... However, I have constantly been researching and grabbing all the help i can, however i feel i am reaching a point of real depression, like it is a no brainer that if you want to do medical, you HAVE to work hard, in fact very hard, however when you have no sources of help and your the first child, it really becomes hard.
    I have experience in pharmacy however no GP or hospital experience.
    Again thank you so much, your response really did help!
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sally120)
    Hello everyone,
    I am intending to apply for medicine, however i have reached a point of utter confusion. I am the eldest so my parents do not know much about university applications.
    My question is that, when do i need to apply to University for medicine? (as in which year, month and when do i take my UKCAT exam ect...) As i am currently in year 12 and i am doing chem, bio, english lit and EPQ. Furthermore, what uni accept a C in gcse maths?
    PLEASE any help would be very very much appreciated, as i am going through a lot of stress and depression.
    Thank you guys.
    Hey,
    I was at a similar position last year.
    In terms of work experience,send an email with a cover letter to every hospital and GP practice near you.Also try to volunteer at a care home or hospice-this is very important and the experience you gain from it is invaluable.
    In terms of the UKCAT,book your test as soon as the registration opens.
    In terms of the Maths GCSE grade,check the entry requirements at each university's website.
    Good luck with your application and feel free to ask any questions.
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    Hi, my daughter is applying to go to med school this year and, following what someone posted above, don’t be too hung up on Hospital experience. My daughter volunteered at a Disability youth club from 16/17 years old and also volunteered ina care Home at a similar age. She did both of these for a year so showed commitment, had lots of experiences to talk about in PS and interview - much more than the odd day watching an operation. In fact, the unis say they want to see long term commitment rather than a day in a hospital as they know it’s hard to get.

    Look at the medic portal - so much info and comparison table to see what gcse grades etc they want.

    Good luck and don’t give up yet x
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    *https://www.themedicportal.com/appli...omparisontool/

    This can help you compare the unis and what’s gcses, a levels, cats etc they need - sadly most look like they want A or B in maths but there’s not too ma y to look through so take your time, check them all (google their online prospectuses) and hope you find one x
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: March 6, 2018

University open days

  1. Norwich University of the Arts
    Postgraduate Open Days Postgraduate
    Thu, 19 Jul '18
  2. University of Sunderland
    Postgraduate Open Day Postgraduate
    Thu, 19 Jul '18
  3. Plymouth College of Art
    All MA Programmes Postgraduate
    Thu, 19 Jul '18
Poll
How are you feeling in the run-up to Results Day 2018?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.