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Is getting into med school the hardest part of becoming a doctor? watch

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    (Original post by LadyEcliptic)
    Anybody have experience with mental health issues and studying medicine? Given the very skew routine and such, I'm curious to see how people have found it.

    As far as I'm aware, there is a heck of a lot more work compared to A levels. Plus, at university, you don't really have anyone there sitting over you telling you to get the work done like you do at school. It was an adjustment that was hard for me.
    Mental health problems are very prevalent both amongst medical students and doctors.

    A lot of medical schools have a separate pastoral support system specifically for medics, which can offer support for issues unique to the course, including things like dealing with difficulties on placement etc.

    It's certainly true that you are more independent with your learning in university. The most important way to look after yourself (imo) is to have a good group of friends around you. Everyone at medical school will be going through similar emotions and difficulties, but few talk about them. Having a bunch of friends who you can let off steam to is vital. University is a great place to meet new people and broaden your horizons, and mental health problems shouldn't necessarily stop you from having a good time.

    There's a lot of support our there for university students; GPs in university areas are very used to seeing students with MH issues. Unis will have their own counselling & support services. A lot of unis also have listening services like Nightline. If things get really tough and begin to impact your studies, you will have a personal tutor (or something similar) to speak to. Medical schools will have things in place, such as extenuating circumstances/interruption of studies to help you get back on track, as well as allowing you to redo placements you may have missed due to ill health. I was quite surprised at the amount of support that was available and the adjustments that can be made.

    Overall though, I think having strong social support is the most important. Medicine is different to most other courses and presents with its own obstacles, but medical schools are aware of this and put support in place to combat these difficulties. A lot of medical students have gone through medical school with mental health problems and have become fantastic doctors by the end of them.
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    No, its one of the easier parts. Whilst I wouldn't say Medicine is conceptually challenging like Physics or math, there is an awful lot to remember...
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    (Original post by Theherp123)
    No, its one of the easier parts. Whilst I wouldn't say Medicine is conceptually challenging like Physics or math, there is an awful lot to remember...
    Are semesters longer for medicine? Some medical schools make you take 180 credits of courses in a whole year.
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    (Original post by rickyrossman)
    Are semesters longer for medicine? Some medical schools make you take 180 credits of courses in a whole year.
    Normally yes, sometimes considerably longer than the normal terms. Depends on the med school though
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    (Original post by rickyrossman)
    Are semesters longer for medicine? Some medical schools make you take 180 credits of courses in a whole year.
    i guess it depends on the medical school, but my 1st-3rd year were pretty equal to other courses in terms of semesters and holidays. It was only in 4th and 5th year that you noticed a considerable difference, such as a lack of Easter holidays, no reading weeks and shorter Christmas holidays.
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    (Original post by nexttime)

    Studying for mandatory doctor's exams is very time consuming (pass rates are generally around 50%, sometimes lower, are only held 3x per year and cost ~£500 per sitting). You rarely, rarely have time to do revision during hours. So loads of extra unpaid work there.
    Who pays the £500 for the exams?
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    (Original post by Ambitious1999)
    Who pays the £500 for the exams?
    The doctor sitting it. I like the optimism behind the question though :p:
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    (Original post by Ambitious1999)
    Who pays the £500 for the exams?
    Democracy couldn't have put it any better :p:

    The GP final exam is a whopping £1600, paid for out of your own pocket. Pass rate is still about 50%, so some people do it 3 or 4 times - ouch.
 
 
 
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