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What laws permit self-defence in the UK? watch

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    I work at a retail store and anyone who works in retail knows that lots and lots of tough cardboard boxes need opening.
    I recently came across an early knife used to open boxes (which opens them muchhhh better than the new ‘safety ones’). I’m just wondering, I know it’s legal to carry as it states on the .gov.uk website that knifes used in work can be carried about.
    The knife is rather long I mist admit, about the size of a cheese knife. Infact it pretty much is a cheese knife. It’s really really think but that also makes it incredibly sharp, like, despite being covered in years worth of sticky salotape glu, it still cuts me finger just brushing along it.
    I live in a rough area and I’m curious, if ever I was to be mugged by someone and pulled out the only weapon I had, what are the consequences? Legally.
    I would like to think the courts would allow self defence in this case.

    Also, if the mugger was to be stabbed, what happens then?

    Thankssss
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    (Original post by Woksin)
    I work at a retail store and anyone who works in retail knows that lots and lots of tough cardboard boxes need opening.
    I recently came across an early knife used to open boxes (which opens them muchhhh better than the new ‘safety ones’). I’m just wondering, I know it’s legal to carry as it states on the .gov.uk website that knifes used in work can be carried about.
    The knife is rather long I mist admit, about the size of a cheese knife. Infact it pretty much is a cheese knife. It’s really really think but that also makes it incredibly sharp, like, despite being covered in years worth of sticky salotape glu, it still cuts me finger just brushing along it.
    I live in a rough area and I’m curious, if ever I was to be mugged by someone and pulled out the only weapon I had, what are the consequences? Legally.
    I would like to think the courts would allow self defence in this case.

    Also, if the mugger was to be stabbed, what happens then?

    Thankssss
    AFAIK any fixed-blade knife that is over 3 inches will automatically be considered an offensive weapon if found on you in a public place unless you have a good reason for carrying it. Carrying such a knife so that it is readily at hand, as opposed to being at the bottom of a bag for example, would also have to be adequately explained. One of the suggested problems with carrying knives around casually for self-defence is that it encourages the carrier to get into conflict (or rather do less to get away from it) when confronted with potentially dangerous situations when they would otherwise put effort into trying to talk their way out, or run from, a threat. Don't carry a knife is my advice but put effort into what is called 'situational awareness'.

    Additional: I'm not a lawyer so I strongly suggest you check out knife law for yourself directly.
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    (Original post by Axiomasher)
    AFAIK any fixed-blade knife that is over 3 inches will automatically be considered an offensive weapon if found on you in a public place unless you have a good reason for carrying it. Carrying such a knife so that it is readily at hand, as opposed to being at the bottom of a bag for example, would also have to be adequately explained. One of the suggested problems with carrying knives around casually for self-defence is that it encourages the carrier to get into conflict (or rather do less to get away from it) when confronted with potentially dangerous situations when they would otherwise put effort into trying to talk their way out, or run from, a threat. Don't carry a knife is my advice but put effort into what is called 'situational awareness'.

    Additional: I'm not a lawyer so I strongly suggest you check out knife law for yourself directly.
    Thanks for the reply! I agree to the most part, but if anyone asks, well, I’m in work uniform with a box knife? Very self explanatory isn’t it?
    The way i see it is of anything did happen I’d want a result like that guy that shot and killed robbers that invaded his house and the police said he’d be sentenced but the judge let him off as it was self defence.
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    (Original post by Woksin)
    Thanks for the reply! I agree to the most part, but if anyone asks, well, I’m in work uniform with a box knife? Very self explanatory isn’t it?....
    I'm not the one you'd have to do your explaining to so it's not for me to say. It's very possible that simply being in work uniform isn't going to be enough to protect you from prosecution if you're found to have a knife on you that happens to be used at work but which you carry around out of work. I imagine that it's an entirely different scenario if you are attacked in your own home and you happen to pick something up that is lying around to defend yourself with. Even then there is the concept of 'reasonable force' to consider.
 
 
 
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