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    Hey guys,

    I've been trying to find answers to some of my questions but I thought it would be easier if I just explain my situation and hope that someone would be able to help me

    So...I'm 20 and only have GCSEs, which are not particularly great - Cs and Bs. Last 3 years of education, haven't been successful; I went back to retake my GCSEs. Then, the 2016/2017 academic year; I started doing a BTEC Science course, which I wasn't really happy with and ended up dropping out. Afterwords, I decided to take a year brake of education and I am currently working as a Dispenser in a Pharmacy.

    I'm planning on applying for an Access to HE course, then university ether for a Biomedical Science course, followed by postgraduate in Medicine, or Pharmacy (which, is my option B), then if I still want to peruse Medicine - apply for that.

    However, I spoke with the Pharmacist today and he emphasized how competitive it is to get into postgraduate MBBS as majority of Biomed graduates try to apply for medicine and there's only limited places, which I obviously was aware of but hadn't really thought about it. He then suggested that, I should look into applying somewhere in the EU, where it would be cheaper and might even save my the 3 years of Biomedical.

    Anyways, my question, or rather query is; if anyone could give me any advice or/and share how they have gotten into the Medical filed via unusual routes - usual, meaning with A-levels.

    Thanks.
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    The pharmacist is correct, GEM is competitive. However, many people do get in. Approximately 10% of applicants get an offer. If you score in the top decile on GAMSAT you're incredibly likely to get an interview. Furthermore, if you have some nice coin you can enrol in a top-tier preparation course.

    If you're put off by GEM you can self-study Biology, Chemistry and another subject that tickles your fancy. Given that you're doing a BTEC Science course, learning the content for AL Bio and Chem will be a doddle. Score AAA-A*A*A* and you'll be sorted. However, you might have to wait until you're in your late 20s to take this route because you'll need to save approximately £40,000. You could also consider study in europe. I know about 3 universities in Czech Republic that teach medicine in english. They cost fairly the same as studying medicine in the UK but I imagine admissions will be easier because they can charge brits as much as they want. https://www.themedicportal.com/appli...dicine-abroad/

    I'm in a similar boat to you. Studying computer science, got A*ABB in totally different A-Levels, but now I want to become a doctor. I'm still figuring out what will be the best route for me, right now I think 5-year medicine will be my best shot.
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    (Original post by rickyrossman)
    The pharmacist is correct, GEM is competitive. However, many people do get in. Approximately 10% of applicants get an offer. If you score in the top decile on GAMSAT you're incredibly likely to get an interview. Furthermore, if you have some nice coin you can enrol in a top-tier preparation course.

    If you're put off by GEM you can self-study Biology, Chemistry and another subject that tickles your fancy. Given that you're doing a BTEC Science course, learning the content for AL Bio and Chem will be a doddle. Score AAA-A*A*A* and you'll be sorted. However, you might have to wait until you're in your late 20s to take this route because you'll need to save approximately £40,000. You could also consider study in europe. I know about 3 universities in Czech Republic that teach medicine in english. They cost fairly the same as studying medicine in the UK but I imagine admissions will be easier because they can charge brits as much as they want. https://www.themedicportal.com/appli...dicine-abroad/

    I'm in a similar boat to you. Studying computer science, got A*ABB in totally different A-Levels, but now I want to become a doctor. I'm still figuring out what will be the best route for me, right now I think 5-year medicine will be my best shot.
    Thanks for replying.

    I've considered self-studying, but when looked at the prices I was just shocked (appreciate free education kids).

    I'm not quite sure yet as to what I'll do but, hopefully I'll figure something out.

    Have you heard anything good about Access to Medicine courses?

    Also, you have good A Level grades - with appropriate work experience and/or volunteering, can't you apply for the Medicine with Foundation year?
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    (Original post by mario16)
    Hey guys,

    I've been trying to find answers to some of my questions but I thought it would be easier if I just explain my situation and hope that someone would be able to help me

    So...I'm 20 and only have GCSEs, which are not particularly great - Cs and Bs. Last 3 years of education, haven't been successful; I went back to retake my GCSEs. Then, the 2016/2017 academic year; I started doing a BTEC Science course, which I wasn't really happy with and ended up dropping out. Afterwords, I decided to take a year brake of education and I am currently working as a Dispenser in a Pharmacy.

    I'm planning on applying for an Access to HE course, then university ether for a Biomedical Science course, followed by postgraduate in Medicine, or Pharmacy (which, is my option B), then if I still want to peruse Medicine - apply for that.

    However, I spoke with the Pharmacist today and he emphasized how competitive it is to get into postgraduate MBBS as majority of Biomed graduates try to apply for medicine and there's only limited places, which I obviously was aware of but hadn't really thought about it. He then suggested that, I should look into applying somewhere in the EU, where it would be cheaper and might even save my the 3 years of Biomedical.

    Anyways, my question, or rather query is; if anyone could give me any advice or/and share how they have gotten into the Medical filed via unusual routes - usual, meaning with A-levels.

    Thanks.
    Hello! I've gone down the Graduate Entry Route (didn't take the right A Levels for medicine, studied a politics degree), and it's not necessarily the ideal choice. If you're sure you want to study medicine then you'd be better off sitting A Levels and applying the normal route. It's super competitive doing GEM (some unis have 41 applicants per place), and its a long and expensive process. If you're unsure if you definitely want to study medicine then maybe it will be the better route for you. Equally, in the nicest way possible, are you sure you can cope with the academic requirements of medicine? It's obviously not an easy course so may be worth considering. If you wanna know more about GEM then just PM me! Best of luck!
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    (Original post by mario16)
    Thanks for replying.

    I've considered self-studying, but when looked at the prices I was just shocked (appreciate free education kids).

    I'm not quite sure yet as to what I'll do but, hopefully I'll figure something out.

    Have you heard anything good about Access to Medicine courses?

    Also, you have good A Level grades - with appropriate work experience and/or volunteering, can't you apply for the Medicine with Foundation year?
    I could but medicine with foundation year is just as competitive as GEM. Personally, I think if you really want to be a doctor you shouldn't take the easier route/GEM because anyone who hasn't failed their degree can apply. It has very low entry requirements.

    Tbh, you don't need to pay for a distance learning course. You just need to pay exam and practical assessment fees. Just don't rack a discripine (lol) and you should be able to get top grades on your own.

    Access to Medicine is a little tricky. Some universities don't like it because of lack of exams. Although Brighton and Sussex medical school said they accept it. Infact they even recommended me to take it at their partner college lol. But I'd say pick A-Levels because you'll have more choice of medical schools. All of them accept A-Levels.
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    (Original post by simplytheworst)
    Hello! I've gone down the Graduate Entry Route (didn't take the right A Levels for medicine, studied a politics degree), and it's not necessarily the ideal choice. If you're sure you want to study medicine then you'd be better off sitting A Levels and applying the normal route. It's super competitive doing GEM (some unis have 41 applicants per place), and its a long and expensive process. If you're unsure if you definitely want to study medicine then maybe it will be the better route for you. Equally, in the nicest way possible, are you sure you can cope with the academic requirements of medicine? It's obviously not an easy course so may be worth considering. If you wanna know more about GEM then just PM me! Best of luck!
    What was your GAMSAT score?
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    (Original post by rickyrossman)
    What was your GAMSAT score?
    You can apply to 5 year courses which are less competitive - 40% get an offer from 4 choices. UKCAT cutoffs aren't impossible for these like they are with GEM.


    You'll pay tuition fees for 4 of those years, with only a maintenance loan of 11,250. This is doable if you're living at home and can commute, otherwise you can save some money up for it.
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    (Original post by Kyber Ninja)
    You can apply to 5 year courses which are less competitive - 40% get an offer from 4 choices. UKCAT cutoffs aren't impossible for these like they are with GEM.


    You'll pay tuition fees for 4 of those years, with only a maintenance loan of 11,250. This is doable if you're living at home and can commute, otherwise you can save some money up for it.
    :O Can you really get a maintenance loan of £11,250? I thought you were only allowed £4000 maintenance and £0 tuition loan if you do medicine as a 2nd degree.
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    (Original post by rickyrossman)
    :O Can you really get a maintenance loan of £11,250? I thought you were only allowed £4000 maintenance and £0 tuition loan if you do medicine as a 2nd degree.
    My bad, that's how it is in Wales.

    I've seen some people supplement their fees by working part-time too.

    Anyways, I'd try focus on GEM first.
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    just gonna chime in, I'm about to start GEM in September and if you do 4 year graduate entry you receive tuition and maintenance, but if you do 5 year medicine as a graduate you receive no funding whatsoever
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    although you do have to pay about a third of the first year's tuition up front, as the NHS doesn't provide this due to high instances of dropping out
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    (Original post by rickyrossman)
    What was your GAMSAT score?
    64 (or 66 when calculated the Nottingham way). If you have any questions about GAMSAT I'm happy to answer!
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    (Original post by rickyrossman)
    I could but medicine with foundation year is just as competitive as GEM. Personally, I think if you really want to be a doctor you shouldn't take the easier route/GEM because anyone who hasn't failed their degree can apply. It has very low entry requirements.

    Tbh, you don't need to pay for a distance learning course. You just need to pay exam and practical assessment fees. Just don't rack a discripine (lol) and you should be able to get top grades on your own.

    Access to Medicine is a little tricky. Some universities don't like it because of lack of exams. Although Brighton and Sussex medical school said they accept it. Infact they even recommended me to take it at their partner college lol. But I'd say pick A-Levels because you'll have more choice of medical schools. All of them accept A-Levels.
    The thing that worries me, if I take normal route, are my GCSEs, especially the fact that I didn't take them in one sitting. With GEM, they would only look at my honours. Right?
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    (Original post by mario16)
    The thing that worries me, if I take normal route, are my GCSEs, especially the fact that I didn't take them in one sitting. With GEM, they would only look at my honours. Right?
    Some medical schools don't look at anything except your degree (Warwick, SGUL, Newcastle, for example), others look at your A-levels (Cambridge, and Liverpool for example), and others will also request specific GCSE grades (can't remember off the top of my head).

    Sent from my SM-T320 using Tapatalk
 
 
 
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