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    Previously I was at a sixth form that was new to me and I managed to make close knit friends, do my best work academically and feel the purpose of everything that I was doing all while being completely new to the school and it was only 2 years long.

    Uni on the other hand has been the complete opposite. I don't feel any purpose at all and every time I go in I always feel like there's no point of me going in because the learning style isn't in a way that you would feel that purpose and unity with the people that you are surrounded by and it forces you to think "why should I even come in if all it will consist of is going through content that is put online". "I can just do that at home". Everything and everyone is so spread out all over the place that it makes it difficult to make close knit friends if any at all.

    It makes it feel pointless for uni to be 3 years as it just feels like its dragging on and it makes you feel lost and hopeless.

    So it begs the question, do you think that there should be an opportunity for people that are studying specific subjects to undertake them through a 2 year degree and then undertake 1 year work experience that would be linked towards the career that they want?
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    Depends on the subject.

    I did engineering, had 35-40hr weeks every semester. No way could that have been cut down by a year.
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    Depends.
    Plenty of people work hard for 3 years.
    Plenty of people make friends.
    It isn't school.

    Sounds like you are on the wrong course, wrong uni or your friend making stratey wasnt great.
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    (Original post by Code101)
    The same could still apply for you. You do 2 years worth of a degree and then the year worth of work experience in Engineering would bring it all together and make up for it and would be more beneficial towards giving you more hope that you are actually doing something worthwhile.
    No, wouldn't work.

    There's a lot of theoretical stuff that you get at uni that you wouldn't get in the workplace, but without which the applied side of the work wouldn't make sense.

    Your 'solution' doesn't work for a lot of degrees. And also fails to take into account that a very large percentage of people don't do work that relates to the degree they have.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    No, wouldn't work.

    There's a lot of theoretical stuff that you get at uni that you wouldn't get in the workplace, but without which the applied side of the work wouldn't make sense.

    Your 'solution' doesn't work for a lot of degrees. And also fails to take into account that a very large percentage of people don't do work that relates to the degree they have.
    If there's alot of theoretical stuff that you get at uni but not at work, why do people find it hard to get jobs after they graduate? Thats where my work experience theory comes in so that you have more of a chance since work experience is what employers ask for anyway alongside a degree is it not?

    And if people don't do work that is related to the degree they have, why endure doing it for 3 years?
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    (Original post by Code101)
    If there's alot of theoretical stuff that you get at uni but not at work, why do people find it hard to get job after they graduate? Thats where my work experience theory comes in so that you have more of a chance since work experience is what employers ask for anyway alongside a degree is it not?

    And if people don't do work that is related to the degree they have, why endure doing it for 3 years?
    Your first question doesn't make sense...

    As for the second one, it's because a huge number of jobs simply ask for "a degree".
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Depends.
    Plenty of people work hard for 3 years.
    Plenty of people make friends.
    It isn't school.

    Sounds like you are on the wrong course, wrong uni or your friend making stratey wasnt great.
    I'm not saying that people don't work hard for three years. I am saying that instead of doing 3 years or 4 years worth of something that you may or may not end up using properly, it would be better for it to be 2 years which is more than enough time for you to learn what you need (and on a 3 year course, the first year usually doesn't count anyway) and then do work experience in the field that you want so that you have a better chance in the career that you want.

    All three of those things I have changed and the result is still the same.
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    (Original post by Code101)
    I'm not saying that people don't work hard for three years. I am saying that instead of doing 3 years or 4 years worth of something that you may or may not end up using properly, it would be better for it to be 2 years which is more than enough time for you to learn what you need (and on a 3 year course, the first year usually doesn't count anyway) and then do work experience in the field that you want so that you have a better chance in the career that you want.

    All three of those things I have changed and the result is still the same.
    Just because it doesn't count to your overall grade doesn't mean you don't learn anything.
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    (Original post by Code101)
    Right, I honestly think that there should be 2 year university courses because I can't see why university is 3 years.

    Previously I was at a sixth form that was new to me and I managed to make close knit friends, do my best work academically and feel the purpose of everything that I was doing all while being completely new to the school and it was only 2 years long.

    Uni on the other hand has been the complete opposite. I don't feel any purpose at all and every time I go in I always feel like there's no point of me going in because the learning style isn't in a way that you would feel that purpose and unity with the people that you are surrounded by and it forces you to think "why should I even come in if all it will consist of is going through content that is put online". "I can just do that at home". Everything and everyone is so spread out all over the place that it makes it difficult to make close knit friends if any at all.

    It makes it feel pointless for uni to be 3 years as it just feels like its dragging on and it makes you feel lost and hopeless.

    I wish that instead of university being 3 (or even worse 4 years) long, it should be 2 years and then you do 1 year work experience which would be linked towards the job that you want to. Anyone else think that would be better?
    Two year degrees are actually being looked at:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-42268310

    Regarding work experience, yes it's a good idea for those degrees that are workplace linked (and many such degrees already do incorporate it) but a lot of degrees are academic, i.e. not directly linked to any specific job or profession (except further research in that field). I'm not really sure if a one-size-fits-all approach works to degrees; that academic ones need to be treated like vocational ones. E.g. I did engineering, and my degree offered the opportunity to "fast-track" i.e. graduate in autumn instead of the next summer if suitable work experience was found during the final two years, which was completed alongside a couple of taught modules during the summer (and I think there are a few other universities offering the option to have "integrated" work placements, i.e. you do a year-in-industry but the degree still takes the same amount of time); it works for engineering, which is a vocational degree, but I'm not sure if it would work for something academic like history or philosophy or maths.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    Just because it doesn't count to your overall grade doesn't mean you don't learn anything.
    The 2nd and 3rd years eclipse everything from the first year so it does.
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    (Original post by Code101)
    The 2nd and 3rd years eclipse everything from the first year so it does.
    Depending on the subject.

    And even then, you wouldn't be able to learn the stuff in 2nd and 3rd years without what you know from 1st.

    I think you have to stop projecting the fact that you clearly don't/ didn't like your university experience onto everyone else. I did 4 years and loved every day.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    Depending on the subject.

    And even then, you wouldn't be admit to learn the stuff in 2nd and 3rd years without what you know from 1st.

    I think you have to stop projecting the fact that you clearly don't/ didn't like your university experience onto everyone else. I did 4 years and loved every day.
    That's fine and fair enough, I am not trying to project anything onto anyone. Maybe I should have been clearer and said "do you think that there should be an opportunity for people that are studying specific subjects to undertake them through the route that I described at the top of the thread?". That probably would've been better.
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    (Original post by Code101)
    That's fine and fair enough, I am not trying to project anything onto anyone. Maybe I should have been clearer and said "do you think that there should be an opportunity for people that are studying specific subjects to undertake them through the route that I described at the top of the thread?". That probably would've been better.
    In which case, you have a point and yes. In fact, it was something Theresa May suggested only a few days ago.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    Two year degrees are actually being looked at:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-42268310

    Regarding work experience, yes it's a good idea for those degrees that are workplace linked (and many such degrees already do incorporate it) but a lot of degrees are academic, i.e. not directly linked to any specific job or profession (except further research in that field). I'm not really sure if a one-size-fits-all approach works to degrees; that academic ones need to be treated like vocational ones. E.g. I did engineering, and my degree offered the opportunity to "fast-track" i.e. graduate in autumn instead of the next summer if suitable work experience was found during the final two years, which was completed alongside a couple of taught modules during the summer (and I think there are a few other universities offering the option to have "integrated" work placements, i.e. you do a year-in-industry but the degree still takes the same amount of time); it works for engineering, which is a vocational degree, but I'm not sure if it would work for something academic like history or philosophy or maths.
    Yeah I realize that it wouldn't work for all degree subjects, but there should be opportunity for the ones that it would work for.
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    (Original post by Code101)
    Right, I honestly think that there should be 2 year university courses because I can't see why university is 3 years.

    Previously I was at a sixth form that was new to me and I managed to make close knit friends, do my best work academically and feel the purpose of everything that I was doing all while being completely new to the school and it was only 2 years long.

    Uni on the other hand has been the complete opposite. I don't feel any purpose at all and every time I go in I always feel like there's no point of me going in because the learning style isn't in a way that you would feel that purpose and unity with the people that you are surrounded by and it forces you to think "why should I even come in if all it will consist of is going through content that is put online". "I can just do that at home". Everything and everyone is so spread out all over the place that it makes it difficult to make close knit friends if any at all.

    It makes it feel pointless for uni to be 3 years as it just feels like its dragging on and it makes you feel lost and hopeless.

    I wish that instead of university being 3 (or even worse 4 years) long, it should be 2 years and then you do 1 year work experience which would be linked towards the job that you want to. Anyone else think that would be better?
    I agree with you. I think some Universities are waste of time, money and effort but they lie to their students about non-existent benefits. I mean why go to a University then end up flipping burgers at McDonalds with student debt.

    I know some people that proudly boast they have been to less than 10% of the lectures and scrape passes. This is because some lectures are dull and others are just people reading off slides rather than actually teaching the subject.

    To your main point, i think there should be different tiers:

    Tier 1: Non-STEM subjects: maybe 2-3 years with 1 extra year for professional experience.

    Tier 2: Small STEM subjects: 3-4 years with 1 extra year for experience.

    Tier 3: Highly-intensive STEM subjects: 4-5 years with the required years for experience. This includes critical subjects in Engineering, Nursing, Medicine etc.

    I strongly doubt people will want a surgeon with 2 years theory and 1 year professional experience to be their GP or operate on them.
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    (Original post by Wired_1800)
    I agree with you. I think some Universities are waste of time, money and effort but they lie to their students about non-existent benefits. I mean why go to a University then end up flipping burgers at McDonalds with student debt.

    I know some people that proudly boast they have been to less than 10% of the lectures and scrape passes. This is because some lectures are dull and others are just people reading off slides rather than actually teaching the subject.

    To your main point, i think there should be different tiers:

    Tier 1: Non-STEM subjects: maybe 2-3 years with 1 extra year for professional experience.

    Tier 2: Small STEM subjects: 3-4 years with 1 extra year for experience.

    Tier 3: Highly-intensive STEM subjects: 4-5 years with the required years for experience. This includes critical subjects in Engineering, Nursing, Medicine etc.

    I strongly doubt people will want a surgeon with 2 years theory and 1 year professional experience to be their GP or operate on them.
    Nevermind that, what I meant to say was do you think that there should be an opportunity for people that are studying specific subjects to undertake them through the 2 year degree, 1 year work experience route? I understand that it wouldn't work for all courses and definitely not for any medical related course but for the ones that it would work for wouldn't it be good?
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    It sounds like you're not actively engaging with your course, lecturers, and peers.

    I speak directly with my lecturers often and to a good number of my classmates daily, even though I'd say I only have one close friend. When fully tuned into a lecture there is always a lot more to be said than what is written on a slide or in the notes. I often leave with several pages of notes, and I don't copy down anything that I know I can access again on Moodle later.
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    (Original post by Code101)
    Yeah I realize that it wouldn't work for all degree subjects, but there should be opportunity for the ones that it would work for.
    I think it is actually at least somewhat common amongst the more vocational degrees.

    The two year degrees that have been proposed, I believe, work by swapping the long summer break for another semester of study. If a three year degree has six semesters currently, turning the summer into another one will mean that degrees can be completed a year earlier. This mainly seems to be proposed for the benefit of mature students who may not want to take three years out of work, but it could really benefit anyone, if tuition fees are reduced and it allows you to start working earlier.
 
 
 
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