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    if you are a full time student at university, do you go to uni Monday - Friday from 9am to 5pm?
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    (Original post by man111111)
    if you are a full time student at university, do you go to uni Monday - Friday from 9am to 5pm?
    No.
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    (Original post by jdddd)
    No.
    how many times per week do students usually go to uni?
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    (Original post by man111111)
    how many times per week do students usually go to uni?
    Depends on the course.
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    (Original post by man111111)
    how many times per week do students usually go to uni?
    Something like medicine is gong to have more contact hours than English.
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    Following wondering the same
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    (Original post by man111111)
    if you are a full time student at university, do you go to uni Monday - Friday from 9am to 5pm?
    Full time refers to the amount of time you're expected to spend on the course, not the amount of time you spend at uni.

    The below applies to the average degree, naturally each degree is different and these values are in no way representative of every uni, every degree and every student.

    To give you a general idea, a course requires 120 credits to pass. A single module has 20 credits, so you do 6 modules per year (or 5 where one is a double, or 4 with two doubles, you get the idea). To pass a module, it is recommended that you spend approximately 200 hours on it. I'll reiterate the above, this is not a fixed figure, I've spent far less on units and still come out with 70%+. In terms of contact hours, it's usually 2 contact hours per week. To reach that 200 hours over 2 semesters (24 weeks) you'd need to spend approximately 8 hours per module per week, so 6 hours of your own time when you take out the 2 contact hours. So in total, you end up doing 6 modules at 8 hours each for a full time value of 48 hours.

    Now that doesn't mean you need to do 48 hours to be considered full time, nor does it mean these numbers fit perfectly all the time. The average student certainly won't need to spend this long on units to come out with an average degree and even to get a first 48 hours may be over the top.

    And of course, contact hours vary wildly by course and unit. One of my units is 3 hours per week. When I was on placement last semester I was doing 8 hours of placement work and maybe another 4 or 5 hours of classes and assignments for that placement. It was also only over one semester, so those 200 hours per module would have been 17 hours per week on a unit, which I actually got close to. But another one of my units that was only one semester long involved 3 contact hours and maybe 3 or 4 hours outside class at most, nowhere near the 17 hours expected.

    In short, the "full time" simply means you'll be studying roughly full time, equivalent to a full time job of 37.5 hours. Your actual contact hours is unlikely to be over 15 hours per week unless you're on a high contact course and putting in an extra 4 hours per module per week would be pretty close to the full time value. But full time doesn't mean you spend 9-5, Monday to Friday in uni. It's a fairly good approximation of the effort required if you want to walk out with a First though.
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    Full time refers to the amount of time you're expected to spend on the course, not the amount of time you spend at uni.

    The below applies to the average degree, naturally each degree is different and these values are in no way representative of every uni, every degree and every student.

    To give you a general idea, a course requires 120 credits to pass. A single module has 20 credits, so you do 6 modules per year (or 5 where one is a double, or 4 with two doubles, you get the idea). To pass a module, it is recommended that you spend approximately 200 hours on it. I'll reiterate the above, this is not a fixed figure, I've spent far less on units and still come out with 70%+. In terms of contact hours, it's usually 2 contact hours per week. To reach that 200 hours over 2 semesters (24 weeks) you'd need to spend approximately 8 hours per module per week, so 6 hours of your own time when you take out the 2 contact hours. So in total, you end up doing 6 modules at 8 hours each for a full time value of 48 hours.

    Now that doesn't mean you need to do 48 hours to be considered full time, nor does it mean these numbers fit perfectly all the time. The average student certainly won't need to spend this long on units to come out with an average degree and even to get a first 48 hours may be over the top.

    And of course, contact hours vary wildly by course and unit. One of my units is 3 hours per week. When I was on placement last semester I was doing 8 hours of placement work and maybe another 4 or 5 hours of classes and assignments for that placement. It was also only over one semester, so those 200 hours per module would have been 17 hours per week on a unit, which I actually got close to. But another one of my units that was only one semester long involved 3 contact hours and maybe 3 or 4 hours outside class at most, nowhere near the 17 hours expected.

    In short, the "full time" simply means you'll be studying roughly full time, equivalent to a full time job of 37.5 hours. Your actual contact hours is unlikely to be over 15 hours per week unless you're on a high contact course and putting in an extra 4 hours per module per week would be pretty close to the full time value. But full time doesn't mean you spend 9-5, Monday to Friday in uni. It's a fairly good approximation of the effort required if you want to walk out with a First though.
    Ok thank you
 
 
 
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