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Is my new housemate HIV positive? how do i approach him about it? watch

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    (Original post by CookieButter)
    All examinations. Infection control procedures but you always see some form of protection with patients suffering from infectious diseases. A doctor is not going to wear an apron to check your blood pressure or heart rate. Infectious diseases = HIV, Hep C and B etc. Staff won't wear gloves and aprons for a patient suffering from flu.


    I think you are getting a bit mixed up. Staff wear aprons, gloves and a face mask for patients with the flu, diarrhoea, vomiting etc - the sorts of infections that can be spread to other patients via droplets or particles. These patients will also be nursed in a single room or a bay with other patients with the same symptoms. And yes, the room will be thoroughly decontaminated before another patient uses it.

    The same precautions are not required for a room where a HIV positive patient has stayed, nor do doctors wear protective equipment just to examine a HIV positive patient.
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    (Original post by Lucas1Wright)
    Is Tenofovir used for HIV treatment? Is my new housemate HIV positive?
    He recently moved in with us, I suspected he wasn't quite right, health wise and after discovering his medication, i am worried that he may have HIV and didn't inform us all, I have not mention anything to the other housemates as of yet, am just worried of sharing things with him, am i overreacting? how do i approach him about it?
    If you had it, you wouldn't tell anyone so why should he tell you? Just avoid any physical contact with him and you should be fine whether he has it or not?
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    (Original post by black tea)
    I think you are getting a bit mixed up. Staff wear aprons, gloves and a face mask for patients with the flu, diarrhoea, vomiting etc - the sorts of infections that can be spread to other patients via droplets or particles. These patients will also be nursed in a single room or a bay with other patients with the same symptoms. And yes, rooms will be thoroughly decontaminated before another patient uses these rooms.

    The same precautions are not required for a room where a HIV positive patient has stayed.
    We do not wear gloves, aprons and surgical masks except in theatre and around patients with infectious diseases at nearly all times in hospital. We do not wear aprons or gloves or surgical masks around patients with the flu. The exact same infection control techniques are used for patients with HIV as with any other infectious disease. A patient suffering from HIV who is at risk of contaminating their environment e.g. open wounds/ loosing body fluids are placed in isolation. This does not apply to patients who do not have infectious diseases such as HIV.
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    (Original post by CookieButter)
    We do not wear gloves, aprons and surgical masks except in theatre and around patients with infectious diseases at nearly all times in hospital. We do not wear aprons or gloves or surgical masks around patients with the flu. The exact same infection control techniques are used for patients with HIV as with any other infectious disease. A patient suffering from HIV who is at risk of contaminating their environment e.g. open wounds/ loosing body fluids are placed in isolation. This does not apply to patients who do not have infectious diseases such as HIV.
    Really? Because wearing the above has been the policy in every UK hospital I have been to for patients with the flu.
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    (Original post by Little Toy Gun)
    Not really.

    If you both chop your tongue off and still mouth right after doing that, then you could get infected.
    Would you kiss a + person while you both have bleeding gums?
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    (Original post by Little Toy Gun)
    It isn't that easy. We're not talking about being Native American here, you need more than one drop of blood to get infected.

    I'm assuming you don't mean both of your gums are so awful that you're visibly dripping fresh blood the whole time, as if you've just cut your mouths open literally.
    So how many drops of blood do you need? You don’t know. I really only said that if the blood of an infected person gets in your body then you could get infected. I don’t know what I’ve said that is so wrong in your books
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    (Original post by Little Toy Gun)
    In the case of a blood transfusion, yes. But even so, the possibility is 90%, not 100%. It'd be 0% if that person is actually negative or undetectable.

    Kissing with bleeding gums, unless your gums are visibly dripping fresh blood the whole time, isn't "the blood of an infected person gets in your body".

    If that's how it works, everyone with a bleeding gum, or at any cut at all, would have died already (and the human race would've died off of course), since bacterias and viruses are literally all around us. But you need to consider the actual amount of exposure, whether it's the volume of the virus or the size of your cut, as well as the probably of infection after one exposure.

    Perhaps to make it easier for you to understand: You don't always catch a cold after a person cough at you.
    Please stop patronising me.
    I said that you could get it, not that you
    always will
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    (Original post by Little Toy Gun)
    You're acting like you do here and seeing some other people's responses, and you're surprised that he didn't tell you it's HIV medication (either treatment or prevention)?
    Quite.
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    (Original post by skint_binzy)
    some people these days HIV is only a risk if you have had unprotected sex or used the same needle and yea it can be passed on by wounds however this is rare if the person wants to keep it a secreat then that's the decision also the person could also he undetectable which in this case then there is a 00.I% chance of getting it
    Less! The PARTNER study covered HIV+/HIV- couples where the HIV+ partner was being treated. In about 68,500 acts of condomless sex, there were no cases of HIV transmission. This allowed the researchers to establish the maximum possible likelihood of transmission, and most likely the chance of an HIV+ person with a fully suppressed viral load of below 200 copies/ml passing on HIV is zero.
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    (Original post by CookieButter)
    We do not wear gloves, aprons and surgical masks except in theatre and around patients with infectious diseases at nearly all times in hospital. We do not wear aprons or gloves or surgical masks around patients with the flu. The exact same infection control techniques are used for patients with HIV as with any other infectious disease. A patient suffering from HIV who is at risk of contaminating their environment e.g. open wounds/ loosing body fluids are placed in isolation. This does not apply to patients who do not have infectious diseases such as HIV.
    I work in a UK hospital and this is completely untrue.

    If you are doing any procedure you should be wearing gloves and aprons. Heck the Healthcare Assistants when changing peoples rooms and bedsheets wear aprons and gloves. Its simply for HYGIENE reasons. Someone with HIV isn't getting singled out because they have HIV thats borderline discrimination.
    I have 4 patients on my ward currently who have HIV and none of them are placed in isolation. We place caution when doing procedures around ALL patients - because that is how we minimise the potential for infection (and I don't mean infection like HIV I mean infection such as MRSA, cold, flu).

    There are procedures for needle stick and sharps incidents - there are procedures for everything.

    I personally do not do any procedure on ANY person without wearing a glove and apron, and if I know they are unwell with Flu like symptoms I always wear a mask.

    Please don't spread round this information when it isn't accurate in the UK, this is how people end up fearing going to the hospital because they are ashamed they will be treated differently.
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    (Original post by MadMaxine25)
    I work in a UK hospital and this is completely untrue.

    If you are doing any procedure you should be wearing gloves and aprons. Heck the Healthcare Assistants when changing peoples rooms and bedsheets wear aprons and gloves.
    You don't wear aprons and gloves unless you are involved in an invasive procedure or around a patient that has an infectious disease. This is standard protocol for infection control in ALL hospitals in the UK. I NEVER wear gloves or aprons unless I'm in theatre or attending an invasive procedure. I would recommend the next time you work in hospital to watch the nurses on your ward rounds. See if they wear gloves and aprons around your average patient and compare it to the way they deal with patients suffering from HIV...members of staff walk around patients in wards without any aprons or gloves...when they approach patients that have infectious disease they are required to wear glove and aprons.

    (Original post by MadMaxine25)
    Its simply for HYGIENE reasons.
    Its not simply hygiene. Its part of protocol.

    (Original post by MadMaxine25)
    Someone with HIV isn't getting singled out because they have HIV thats borderline discrimination.
    This isn't about singling people out mate nor is it discrimination calm your politically correct tits. Medical staff are trained in infection control including students before they start work/attend clinical. The aim of this is to minimise spread of infectious diseases inside the hospital including those that are blood born like HIV from patients to other patients from patients to staff and from staff to patients. This is particularly important around patients suffering from HIV who are immunosuppressed and at greater risk of contracting infectious diseases and suffering serious repercussions from this. If you think you do not need to wear protection around patients that have HIV then you are not only a risk to yourself and other staff and patients but you are a HUGE risk to the patient. if you had a basic level of medical knowledge which clearly you don't you would know that HIV patients are immunosuppressed. Their immune system is compromised. Inside the hospital where risk of infection is relatively high they are at greater risk of contracting a disease and suffering greatly from it. This is a great example for the evils of political correctness. You don't want to offend patients with HIV but thanks to your ignorance you put them at risk of death.

    (Original post by MadMaxine25)
    I have 4 patients on my ward currently who have HIV and none of them are placed in isolation. We place caution when doing procedures around ALL patients - because that is how we minimise the potential for infection (and I don't mean infection like HIV I mean infection such as MRSA, cold, flu).
    Its important that before you reply to comments that you read them properly. You might have no understood what I wrote and judging from your reply you are not a medical student so i'm guessing assistant/student studying nursing or something along those lines.
    "A patient suffering from HIV who is at risk of contaminating their environment e.g. open wounds/ loosing body fluids are placed in isolation." This is standard protocol in this country as is the case with all other countries across the globe. A warning sign is placed outside the room informing staff that they need to take extra precaution around the patient. This is not to stigmatise the patient or discriminate against them. Only in the mind of layman who has no medical experience would it come across in this way. These procedures are carried out for the protection not only of staff and other patients but for the patient themselves.

    (Original post by MadMaxine25)
    I personally do not do any procedure on ANY person without wearing a glove and apron, and if I know they are unwell with Flu like symptoms I always wear a mask.
    That's because you probably work around invasive procedures and I stated that clearly in the comments above. People with infectious diseases undergoing all examinations require control procedures to be carried out to reduce their risk of conducting a disease or spreading their disease to others...including examinations that are none invasive. This is part of standard protocol for patients with HIV. These procedures are not carried out for patients that do not have HIV.

    (Original post by MadMaxine25)
    Please don't spread round this information when it isn't accurate in the UK, this is how people end up fearing going to the hospital because they are ashamed they will be treated differently.
    Assuming you really work in a hospital I worry for the people that you work with. In this country hospital born infections are a major cause of mortality and the government has over the past twenty years been involved educating people on all levels and spreading awareness about infectious diseases in hospitals. Informing people about risks allows people to take precautions for these risks and to limit them. This is what has helped slash infection rates for MRSA, pneumonia etc inside hospitals in the UK...
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    (Original post by CookieButter)
    The referral is a piece of paper that refers the patient for a particular examination within the hospital. It is not the patient's medical history. The paper carries information about the examination and a few essential details about the patient. This includes whether or not the patient has an infectious disease.

    EDIT: So when you have a patient with an infectious disease coming into an examination room extra linen is used to cover the equipment. The equipment is thoroughly cleaned using special chemical agents after the examination. All the staff are required to wear aprons and gloves when in the vicinity of the patient and cover their mouths with a surgical mask. The staff are also required to thoroughly wash their hands after the procedure regardless of what they did and everything in the room is changed after the patient leaves. If there are any spillages of fluids from the patient the entire place is shut down until it is thoroughly disinfected...and by thoroughly i mean everything including sometimes the walls are scrubbed down.

    Staff don't wear gloves and aprons except in cases involving patients who are immunosuppressed and/or suffering from an infectious disease.
    Most of this is ********.

    Gloves/aprons etc are used in any situation there’s potential of exposure to bodily fluids from any patient. They’re called universal precautions. You don’t need to undertake any sort of special preparation for a room that a patient with HIV is staying in and linen, room cleaning etc is dealt with through the usual chains. It’s not the patients with known blood borne viruses we worry about in healthcare, as their condition will be under some form of management, it’s the ones who are undiagnosed hence these universal precautions.

    In reply to the OP, you have no right what so ever to knowing your housemates confidential medical information. As proven by this thread, there’s still a lot of misconceptions and a stigma related to the condition, so it’s ubderstandable that he may not want to divulge whether he has it or not to you.
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    No just cos he may not be comfortable
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    (Original post by moonkatt)
    Most of this is ********.

    Gloves/aprons etc are used in any situation there’s potential of exposure to bodily fluids from any patient. They’re called universal precautions. You don’t need to undertake any sort of special preparation for a room that a patient with HIV is staying in and linen, room cleaning etc is dealt with through the usual chains. It’s not the patients with known blood borne viruses we worry about in healthcare, as their condition will be under some form of management, it’s the ones who are undiagnosed hence these universal precautions.
    Please, don't argue for the sake of arguing.

    None of what you wrote contradicts what I wrote. In fact everything that you wrote parrots what I wrote in the comment above. You confirm what I wrote, that HIV requires extra precautions. The counter argument by others in this thread is that it doesn't and that HIV patients are treated just like any other patient. That's it. I'm going to leave it here. Trolls are starting to troll this thread for attention and I'm just not the in mood today.
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    (Original post by CookieButter)
    You don't wear aprons and gloves unless you are involved in an invasive procedure or around a patient that has an infectious disease. This is standard protocol for infection control in ALL hospitals in the UK. I NEVER wear gloves or aprons unless I'm in theatre or attending an invasive procedure. I would recommend the next time you work in hospital to watch the nurses on your ward rounds. See if they wear gloves and aprons around your average patient and compare it to the way they deal with patients suffering from HIV...members of staff walk around patients in wards without any aprons or gloves...when they approach patients that have infectious disease they are required to wear glove and aprons.



    Its not simply hygiene. Its part of protocol.



    This isn't about singling people out mate nor is it discrimination calm your politically correct tits. Medical staff are trained in infection control including students before they start work/attend clinical. The aim of this is to minimise spread of infectious diseases inside the hospital including those that are blood born like HIV from patients to other patients from patients to staff and from staff to patients. This is particularly important around patients suffering from HIV who are immunosuppressed and at greater risk of contracting infectious diseases and suffering serious repercussions from this. If you think you do not need to wear protection around patients that have HIV then you are not only a risk to yourself and other staff and patients but you are a HUGE risk to the patient. if you had a basic level of medical knowledge which clearly you don't you would know that HIV patients are immunosuppressed. Their immune system is compromised. Inside the hospital where risk of infection is relatively high they are at greater risk of contracting a disease and suffering greatly from it. This is a great example for the evils of political correctness. You don't want to offend patients with HIV but thanks to your ignorance you put them at risk of death.



    Its important that before you reply to comments that you read them properly. You might have no understood what I wrote and judging from your reply you are not a medical student so i'm guessing assistant/student studying nursing or something along those lines.
    "A patient suffering from HIV who is at risk of contaminating their environment e.g. open wounds/ loosing body fluids are placed in isolation." This is standard protocol in this country as is the case with all other countries across the globe. A warning sign is placed outside the room informing staff that they need to take extra precaution around the patient. This is not to stigmatise the patient or discriminate against them. Only in the mind of layman who has no medical experience would it come across in this way. These procedures are carried out for the protection not only of staff and other patients but for the patient themselves.



    That's because you probably work around invasive procedures and I stated that clearly in the comments above. People with infectious diseases undergoing all examinations require control procedures to be carried out to reduce their risk of conducting a disease or spreading their disease to others...including examinations that are none invasive. This is part of standard protocol for patients with HIV. These procedures are not carried out for patients that do not have HIV.



    Assuming you really work in a hospital I worry for the people that you work with. In this country hospital born infections are a major cause of mortality and the government has over the past twenty years been involved educating people on all levels and spreading awareness about infectious diseases in hospitals. Informing people about risks allows people to take precautions for these risks and to limit them. This is what has helped slash infection rates for MRSA, pneumonia etc inside hospitals in the UK...
    I'd screenshot and send you the CNWL procedures for wearing aprons and gloves during ALL procedures but I can't be bothered to converse with quite frankly a very rude person. You assume that I work below a Nurse? You need a major attitude adjustment and I feel really sorry for the patients you work with if this is how you speak to people.
    Nurses and Doctors and HCA's on my ward all wear gloves when dealing with patients, no matter who they are and what diseases they have... so the protocol you have in your hospital might not be the same elsewhere. Perhaps you should google all the hospital procedures for each hospital in every NHS trust (that should keep your closed mind occupied for some time).

    You make the assumption that I don't work in a hospital... Mate I just feel sorry for how aggressive and rude you feel you need to get on a community chat. I'm trying to ensure that people don't leave this forum thinking that its incredibly easy to be infected with the HIV virus, and that people should avoid others... what are you trying to do? Scare people into fearing others? Great work there mate, maybe you should focus on your people skills if you really do work in a hospital (of which I am highly doubting at the moment).

    This whole thread was created because someone was worried about living with someone who may or may not be HIV positive, and all you seem to have done on here is create a huge scaremonger tactic and spreading round inaccurate information. Have you ever been to a GP? Maybe next time you go and have an examination talk to them about the procedures they take so you are up to date?

    I feel sorry for people like you, who have to get rude and aggressive on posts like these, especially with such an important topic as prejudice against HIV patients.

    Thats all I have to say on the matter - Good Day
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    (Original post by CookieButter)
    if you had a basic level of medical knowledge which clearly you don't you would know that HIV patients are immunosuppressed. Their immune system is compromised.
    If you had a a basic level of medical knowledge, you would know that there is a difference between HIV and AIDS, and that a HIV positive person on therapy may have a normal CD4 count, hence be no less immunocompromised than the average person.
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    (Original post by black tea)
    If you had a a basic level of medical knowledge, you would know that there is a difference between HIV and AIDS, and that a HIV positive person on therapy may have a normal CD4 count, hence be no less immunosuppressed than the average person.
    HIV infection process is made up of a number of stages. It is normally not diagnosed until it reaches a point where there is enough depletion in CD4+ T cells and T lymphocytes in the body...process of immunosuppression occurs in all patients suffering from HIV from the moment they are infected by the virus. it cannot be stopped it can only be slowed down by slowing the rate of multiplication of the virus. All patients suffering from HIV have some form immunosuppression which gets worse with time. Like i said I'm done with this thread. Later.
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    (Original post by CookieButter)

    EDIT: So when you have a patient with an infectious disease coming into an examination room extra linen is used to cover the equipment. The equipment is thoroughly cleaned using special chemical agents after the examination. All the staff are required to wear aprons and gloves when in the vicinity of the patient and cover their mouths with a surgical mask. The staff are also required to thoroughly wash their hands after the procedure regardless of what they did and everything in the room is changed after the patient leaves. If there are any spillages of fluids from the patient the entire place is shut down until it is thoroughly disinfected...and by thoroughly i mean everything including sometimes the walls are scrubbed down.
    Don’t they do this with everyone? Because routine checkups follow the same protocol
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    (Original post by CookieButter)
    Please, don't argue for the sake of arguing.

    None of what you wrote contradicts what I wrote. In fact everything that you wrote parrots what I wrote in the comment above. You confirm what I wrote, that HIV requires extra precautions. The counter argument by others in this thread is that it doesn't and that HIV patients are treated just like any other patient. That's it. I'm going to leave it here. Trolls are starting to troll this thread for attention and I'm just not the in mood today.
    Please, don't accuse me of trolling for having a different opinion to you. I didn't confirm what you wrote, if you read what I wrote this much is clear.

    Universal precautions are undertaken when doing anything that may expose you to bodily fluids from any patient, not just those with BBV. These precautions are enough to protect you from the risk of infection in someone who may be HIV positive. This is ward based care, so emptying catheters, cannulating veins etc. There is no need to isolate a patient purely on the basis of them having HIV, there are infections that are much more transmissible and can wreak havoc in hospitals that isolation rooms need to be used for (c-diff, VRE, CPE etc).

    There are certain situations where the risk of transmission is increased, such as in haemodialysis where patients are often cohorted so that risk of transmission of BBVs is minimalised, however the precautions taken on the ward are no different to caring for someone who is not diagnosed with a BBV.
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    Don’t they do this with everyone? Because routine checkups follow the same protocol
    You don't need a mask unless there's risk if airborne transmission, which there is not with HIV.

    Universal precautions (apron, gloves, eye protection if at risk of splash) are adequate to protect yourself from HIV when undertaking ward level care. You clean the bedspace and deal with soiled linen the same way you would with any other patient.
 
 
 
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