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i hate that the education system is so exam-based watch

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    (Original post by DrawTheLine)
    A lot of people also have anxiety over their driving tests, does that mean we need to find a different way to determine if someone is able to drive on their own?

    A lot of people are anxious over a job interview. What do we do instead when deciding who to hire?

    This problem is everywhere. Tests are a part of life and can't be avoided. If not a school exam then it's a driving test or a job interview or something else.
    I'm not saying they should be avoided, just that they should weigh less/be less high stakes. you'd still be reaping their benefits (for later in life) that way.

    and you can't really compare adolescent issues to adult issues. adolescents (ie high schoolers) are at a critical stage of their life, so they should be..protected, to an extent, from problems later in life. exams take a huge toll on many teenagers and I'd even go to say, ruin their teenage years, which are such critical years to their growth--socially, personally, etc.
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    (Original post by remaal)
    ...this doesn’t solve the root problem here of exams not even measuring what they claim to measure.
    You are referring to validity and there is a LOT of work done to ensure exams are valid.

    But. You are correct. The typical exam based system isn't right for everyone. But no one system can be. And multiple systems cannot be made 100 % comparable (i.e. reliability is an issue between systems).

    Since there is no one perfect system, the logical thing to do is plump for the "best" system. The one that allows for the highest reliability and validity and ensures that you assessing that student (rather than a system that is susceptible to cheating, by student, parent and/or teacher etc.). Exams are obviously (I say obviously as research has been done that has led to this conclusion) that "best" system.

    This "best" system may not be the best for you. And that is terrible for you. But if we used the system that was best for you, then it would be terrible for someone else. It is unfortunately a bit of a NIMBY problem.
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    (Original post by remaal)
    I'm not saying they should be avoided, just that they should weigh less/be less high stakes. you'd still be reaping their benefits (for later in life) that way.

    and you can't really compare adolescent issues to adult issues. adolescents (ie high schoolers) are at a critical stage of their life, so they should be..protected, to an extent, from problems later in life. exams take a huge toll on many teenagers and I'd even go to say, ruin their teenage years, which are such critical years to their growth--socially, personally, etc.
    And then what happens when suddenly they are faced with all these adult problems? Totally unable to deal with them because they've been "protected" from it during school.
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    (Original post by Kyber Ninja)
    Do BTECs then; they're mainly coursework
    not accessible to me (cause it's not taught here, one, and two, I can't move schools). my only options were full ib, partial ib or a high school diploma--which is basically an internally examined ib diploma, so it's not all that different.
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    (Original post by Kyber Ninja)
    Do BTECs then; they're mainly coursework
    I think some of them have exams now.
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    (Original post by remaal)
    especially the secondary education system. it excludes bad test takers / those with test anxiety & before u tell me there’s learning support for them it’s very inaccessiblee so 🤷🏽 it takes forever to get approved/theyre very selective and for what, extra time? a different room? this doesn’t solve the root problem here of exams not even measuring what they claim to measure. sure theyre reliable and efficient..but the education system shouldn’t be like some factory churning out “”educated”” ppl, u kno..some irreliability and inefficiency is fine. it’s ****ing learning for gods sake.

    sigh. i cant even be bothered w how **** the education system is right now. im kind of just shrugging it off. i hope it’s not as ****ing exclusive as it is now to future generations (tho it probably will be with increase in population, they’ll be adding even more “efficiency” measures. ofc efficiency measures that come at the expense of the students)

    (btw im talking about the ibdp program but this goes for a-levels, etc)
    You can overcome those things with practice, in my opinion
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    Exams suit me a lot better than coursework. Coursework can be unfair if marking isn't consistent and requires a lot of consistent work over the year which is arguably more stressful if most of the work you are doing counts towards your final grade. A lot of subjects just don't make sense for them not to be exams.
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    (Original post by DrawTheLine)
    And then what happens when suddenly they are faced with all these adult problems? Totally unable to deal with them because they've been "protected" from it during school.
    I said protected 'to an extent'. everyone I know says their teenage years were the hardest years of their lives. why is that? it's a crazy amount of pressure we put on 16-17 year olds, still figuring things out, still transitioning. and for what? increased mental illness rates among teenagers? traumatized, regretful adults?

    im on the same page with you. they should be exposed to the difficulties of the real-world, so that they can warm up to them, but GRADUALLY, not all-at-once (tho since we're talking about exams..how do exams do that exactly? all I hear from high school grads is that school did nothing to prepare them for adulthood 🤷🏽). they need to be cut some slack so that they can get to know themselves and end their teenage years, content.
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    (Original post by black1blade)
    Exams suit me a lot better than coursework. Coursework can be unfair if marking isn't consistent and requires a lot of consistent work over the year which is arguably more stressful if most of the work you are doing counts towards your final grade. A lot of subjects just don't make sense for them not to be exams.
    I get that, and I'm sorry that course work stresses you out. but you have to understand that with such an exam-based education system, those with test anxiety are put at a huge disadvantage, and those without are done a huge favor. my inconsistency in exams drives my grade down so much, you don't even know. it's crazy frustrating bc that grade is then taken to be a measure of my intelligence when it's not a valid measure!!

    there needs to be..a middle ground. and what are the subjects which wouldn't work as mostly coursework? (again I'm not saying let's not do exams, just have them weigh them less)

    as for unfair marking with coursework, it's not a perfect solution as it has its problems, but it could be externally examined?
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    (Original post by remaal)
    I said protected 'to an extent'. everyone I know says their teenage years were the hardest years of their lives. why is that? it's a crazy amount of pressure we put on 16-17 year olds, still figuring things out, still transitioning. and for what? increased mental illness rates among teenagers? traumatized, regretful adults?

    im on the same page with you. they should be exposed to the difficulties of the real-world, so that they can warm up to them, but GRADUALLY, not all-at-once (tho since we're talking about exams..how do exams do that exactly? all I hear from high school grads is that school did nothing to prepare them for adulthood 🤷🏽). they need to be cut some slack so that they can get to know themselves and end their teenage years, content.
    I don't think you can say that increased mental illness rate is just down to exams since they've been around for ages. You could argue that there is now more pressure to succeed in exams.
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    (Original post by remaal)
    especially the secondary education system. it excludes bad test takers / those with test anxiety & before u tell me there’s learning support for them it’s very inaccessiblee so 🤷🏽 it takes forever to get approved/theyre very selective and for what, extra time? a different room? this doesn’t solve the root problem here of exams not even measuring what they claim to measure. sure theyre reliable and efficient..but the education system shouldn’t be like some factory churning out “”educated”” ppl, u kno..some irreliability and inefficiency is fine. it’s ****ing learning for gods sake.

    sigh. i cant even be bothered w how **** the education system is right now. im kind of just shrugging it off. i hope it’s not as ****ing exclusive as it is now to future generations (tho it probably will be with increase in population, they’ll be adding even more “efficiency” measures. ofc efficiency measures that come at the expense of the students)

    (btw im talking about the ibdp program but this goes for a-levels, etc)
    I agree, I come from Spain, there we do like 11 A levels. Here I am doing 4 and it so annoying. I don't think I am even getting real education. For example, I am doing Biology, and I can't say I know biology, I must say I know OCR BIOLOGY. It is so dependent on exam boards. Wait, it is not even OCR Biology, it is OCR BIOLOGY A. OCR BIOLOGY B is something else
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    I'm much more a fan of coursework than I am of exams, but some subjects really do just naturally require exam work. Maths, the hard sciences, etc. are all naturally and understandably more exam based. Other subjects like English though reward more prolonged thought, and it never made sense to me to have some of those subjects so exam heavy.
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    (Original post by Hammad(214508))
    I agree, I come from Spain, there we do like 11 A levels. Here I am doing 4 and it so annoying. I don't think I am even getting real education.
    In the UK, students study about ten subjects at GCSE, about three hours per subject, then study about eight hours per week each in 3-4 subjects. The extra time allows for much more in depth studies. If the Spanish study "like 11 A levels", then students cannot be studying to the same level of depth as English A levels.
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    (Original post by PlayWithMarkers)
    I'm much more a fan of coursework than I am of exams, but some subjects really do just naturally require exam work. Maths, the hard sciences, etc. are all naturally and understandably more exam based. Other subjects like English though reward more prolonged thought, and it never made sense to me to have some of those subjects so exam heavy.
    👆🏽👆🏽👆🏽👆🏽 👆🏽 fully agree with you on that. here im really just talking about those subjects to which exams are unnecessary.
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    I think to all subjects, written papers are a necessity in order to test the applications of your understanding in a timed situation. Coursework and Control assessments on the other hand have been easily abused in the past, especially at GCSE, leading to inconsistency in marking. Of course there are subjects that need it, like Music and art, and that’s fine ( though i still won’t Deny it’s not hard to get good grades in music given its nature)
    Overcoming anxiety is part of life, and thus I believe the current system of exams work ( whether I agree on the set up of the curriculum at times is another matter entirely)
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    (Original post by Hammad(214508))
    I agree, I come from Spain, there we do like 11 A levels. Here I am doing 4 and it so annoying. I don't think I am even getting real education. For example, I am doing Biology, and I can't say I know biology, I must say I know OCR BIOLOGY. It is so dependent on exam boards. Wait, it is not even OCR Biology, it is OCR BIOLOGY A. OCR BIOLOGY B is something else
    Different courses, freedom for schools to choose different exam boards based on their thoughts on the specification. Choice is always a good thing, it’s good for business and it’s good for satisfaction levels.
    Spain, and by extension a lot of Europe, study their equivalent of a level in much less depth. The aim there is to keep knowledge as broad as possible, whilst compromising on the detail and specialisation on subjects. It also gives you less choice on subjects you don’t continue on with there.
    Here, a levels are meant to give a lot more depth into that subject and what surrounds that subject (though a level language specs are poorly done). After two years, you generally come out with quite a good understanding of the subject, and have got qualifications in 3-4 subjects that you most likely care about
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    Let’s just all move to Finland or something 😅
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