Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    I am currently in year 12 and have no idea about what I want to do other than the fact I want to study engineering and go on to become an engineer. However, there are so many different types of engineering I dont know what kind of course to take at Uni. Is it possible to take a basic engineering course and specialize later in my degree? Is there a way I can figure out what type of engineering I will enjoy most? PLEASE HELP!!
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by LucyFox54)
    I am currently in year 12 and have no idea about what I want to do other than the fact I want to study engineering and go on to become an engineer. However, there are so many different types of engineering I dont know what kind of course to take at Uni. Is it possible to take a basic engineering course and specialize later in my degree? Is there a way I can figure out what type of engineering I will enjoy most? PLEASE HELP!!
    Some universities offer "general engineering" degrees, where you start off broad, studying a variety of different disciplines, but specialise (typically around half way through the course) in a particular discipline.

    What kinds of things would you most like to work on as an engineer?
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    Hi, I am also in Year 12 doing A Levels. I believe I'm in a similar situation to you where I would like to study engineering but not exactly sure what course. At the moment I think imma do Mechanical Engineering as it's the most broad course which is like the general engineering stuff, rather than studying a specific course which ties me into careers in that area only
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Smack)
    Some universities offer "general engineering" degrees, where you start off broad, studying a variety of different disciplines, but specialise (typically around half way through the course) in a particular discipline.

    What kinds of things would you most like to work on as an engineer?
    Thank you, and I think that is my issue as I find most types interesting. I think I would really like to work on innovating. I have an interest in aspects of nuclear engineering but I would like to see what else is out there. I really enjoy thinking outside the box for ideas and how we can make things better and get them to work, I guess?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Josh_Greaves703)
    Hi, I am also in Year 12 doing A Levels. I believe I'm in a similar situation to you where I would like to study engineering but not exactly sure what course. At the moment I think imma do Mechanical Engineering as it's the most broad course which is like the general engineering stuff, rather than studying a specific course which ties me into careers in that area only
    I've been told in the past to do mechanical or chemical because they are so broad and can open so many doors. I guess I'm just worried about the type of modules I'd be studying as I don't think I'd enjoy the side of mechanical engineering surrounded by cars and such.
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by LucyFox54)
    Thank you, and I think that is my issue as I find most types interesting. I think I would really like to work on innovating. I have an interest in aspects of nuclear engineering but I would like to see what else is out there. I really enjoy thinking outside the box for ideas and how we can make things better and get them to work, I guess?
    Start with BEng general or mechanical or chemical and then consider MSc Nuclear.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Start with BEng general or mechanical or chemical and then consider MSc Nuclear.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    So when I apply for courses do I apply for Bachelors and then a Masters or a Masters and specialize in 4th year?
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by LucyFox54)
    So when I apply for courses do I apply for Bachelors and then a Masters or a Masters and specialize in 4th year?
    You can apply for an MEng and then "drop down" to the BEng if you want to. You would either do an MEng or BEng + MSc

    All courses allow you to specialise as you progress through the years.
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LucyFox54)
    I've been told in the past to do mechanical or chemical because they are so broad and can open so many doors. I guess I'm just worried about the type of modules I'd be studying as I don't think I'd enjoy the side of mechanical engineering surrounded by cars and such.
    An idea would be to look at different Uni websites and look at what engineering courses they offer. There should be details on what modules you would study in each year, so you could look and decide whether you would enjoy them or not 😊
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LucyFox54)
    So when I apply for courses do I apply for Bachelors and then a Masters or a Masters and specialize in 4th year?
    I'd think about a university where the courses offers a year in industry and newer unis tend to be more industry focused. For example designing an object and using a 3D printer.
    Which A levels are you studying?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    You can apply for an MEng and then "drop down" to the BEng if you want to. You would either do an MEng or BEng + MSc

    All courses allow you to specialise as you progress through the years.
    Do you believe it would be better to do a BEng + MSc instead of a MEng?
    Also how long does it take to complete a MSc?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Muttley79)
    I'd think about a university where the courses offers a year in industry and newer unis tend to be more industry focused. For example designing an object and using a 3D printer.
    Which A levels are you studying?
    I would really enjoy doing a year in industry or abroad definitely. Thanks for the input
    Im currently studying Physics, Chemistry and Maths.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Josh_Greaves703)
    An idea would be to look at different Uni websites and look at what engineering courses they offer. There should be details on what modules you would study in each year, so you could look and decide whether you would enjoy them or not 😊
    Thank you! I was wondering have you done work experience in engineering or have you just done a lot of research?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LucyFox54)
    I would really enjoy doing a year in industry or abroad definitely. Thanks for the input
    Im currently studying Physics, Chemistry and Maths.
    That's a good combination. As others have said look at the modules and check you will get CAD/CAM experience and design modules.

    Look also at the balance between exams and coursework. Make sure there is group work as you will often work in a team and you'll need to exemplify this in applications.
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by LucyFox54)
    Do you believe it would be better to do a BEng + MSc instead of a MEng?
    Also how long does it take to complete a MSc?
    An MSc is usually a year. So BEng + MSc is the same time as a MEng.

    If you really want to specialise in nuclear I don't think the MEng would cover that speciality. However I'd be willing to bet any nuclear grad jobs would also be open to mechanical/chemical MEng. Have a look at some job ads and see.

    Note there are slight funding differences. An MEng (or BEng) is fully funded by student finance (tuition + maintenance loan) whereas the MSc is covered by a fixed £10k with no separate maintenance loan.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Muttley79)
    I'd think about a university where the courses offers a year in industry and newer unis tend to be more industry focused. For example designing an object and using a 3D printer.
    Which A levels are you studying?
    Whilst doing a year in industry would I still be doing uni work? Any ideas on the benefits of it whilst I'm still unsure on the type of engineering I want to pursue?
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LucyFox54)
    Thank you! I was wondering have you done work experience in engineering or have you just done a lot of research?
    Nah I haven't done any work experience bit would like to do some as I guess it's really important for engineering ahah

    And yeah I've have done quite a bit of research, just interested in finding out the kind of things I'd learn
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Muttley79)
    That's a good combination. As others have said look at the modules and check you will get CAD/CAM experience and design modules.

    Look also at the balance between exams and coursework. Make sure there is group work as you will often work in a team and you'll need to exemplify this in applications.
    Thank you so much!! This is so helpful!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    An MSc is usually a year. So BEng + MSc is the same time as a MEng.

    If you really want to specialise in nuclear I don't think the MEng would cover that speciality. However I'd be willing to bet any nuclear grad jobs would also be open to mechanical/chemical MEng. Have a look at some job ads and see.

    Note there are slight funding differences. An MEng (or BEng) is fully funded by student finance (tuition + maintenance loan) whereas the MSc is covered by a fixed £10k with no separate maintenance loan.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I think I will wait until I'm sure what I want to specialise in. Thank you. Do I still specialise in a Masters then... depending on what the university offers?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Josh_Greaves703)
    Nah I haven't done any work experience bit would like to do some as I guess it's really important for engineering ahah

    And yeah I've have done quite a bit of research, just interested in finding out the kind of things I'd learn
    Hahaha. Yeah I'm the same. If you research Nuffield placements they do work placements over the summer holidays for STEM subjects. But check it out soon as they application deadline is the end of march.
    Need to start doing some research... it's all so stressful haha.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: February 25, 2018
Poll
Do you think parents should charge rent?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.