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Finding it difficult to choose a career as I have no interest in anything anymore watch

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    I'm a Year 12 A-Level student studying Chemistry, Biology, History and Maths. I'd always wanted to go into medicine but I feel like I've lost any motivation I previously had to pursue a career as a doctor. In fact, I don't feel particularly interested in any courses/potential careers I've researched.

    There is either the issue of having no enthusiasm towards the degree, or that the career prospects are not great.

    Please help!! I have no idea where to go from here, I know I want to do a degree but I'm struggling to find anything I'd like to study!
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    are you interested in any of your subjects specifically?
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    (Original post by entertainmyfaith)
    are you interested in any of your subjects specifically?
    Yes, history has always been my stronger subject as it is the one I'm most interested in. I feel like I only chose the sciences because of the medicine requirements, perhaps I would've done an A Level in languages otherwise?
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    (Original post by chloebeauchamp)
    Yes, history has always been my stronger subject as it is the one I'm most interested in. I feel like I only chose the sciences because of the medicine requirements, perhaps I would've done an A Level in languages otherwise?
    have you looked into a history degree, or perhaps journalism?
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    Consider taking a truncated language A Level next year and perhaps hold off applying to uni until next year, or stretching your A Levels across 3 years to do more? It might not be the best idea to set yourself on a path if you don't know where you're going. As anxious as many people are to start university, I can't emphasise enough how much better off you are with an idea of what you're interested in and why. Much better to take a year out now, and be able to also get some other experience, before you start than to realise you rushed off to uni and made a mistake and end up unhappy or even dropping out or changing courses.
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    (Original post by entertainmyfaith)
    have you looked into a history degree, or perhaps journalism?
    I've thought a lot about studying a history degree, as I feel like it's something I'd enjoy, however it was the career prospects that worried me. My previous history teacher had an Oxbridge degree yet only taught GCSE history, and I definitely wouldn't like to go into teaching. I'm not sure what I'd do once I completed the degree?

    I'm not too sure journalism is for me, but I'll definitely look more into it. Thank you for your advice!!
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    (Original post by Greatleysteg)
    Consider taking a truncated language A Level next year and perhaps hold off applying to uni until next year, or stretching your A Levels across 3 years to do more? It might not be the best idea to set yourself on a path if you don't know where you're going. As anxious as many people are to start university, I can't emphasise enough how much better off you are with an idea of what you're interested in and why. Much better to take a year out now, and be able to also get some other experience, before you start than to realise you rushed off to uni and made a mistake and end up unhappy or even dropping out or changing courses.
    I've considered taking a year out, however I was worried I'd have difficulty applying to specific courses that way, as I've read that there are subjects/universities that prefer candidates that apply straight after college. That being said, I can understand how a gap year could be of great benefit and will allow me to decide on what I want to do. Experience in different areas during this time would definitely help with my decision, perhaps it's something I need to think about doing.

    Thank you for your help!!
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    (Original post by chloebeauchamp)
    I've thought a lot about studying a history degree, as I feel like it's something I'd enjoy, however it was the career prospects that worried me. My previous history teacher had an Oxbridge degree yet only taught GCSE history, and I definitely wouldn't like to go into teaching. I'm not sure what I'd do once I completed the degree?

    I'm not too sure journalism is for me, but I'll definitely look more into it. Thank you for your advice!!
    there's a website here that might give you options:
    https://www.topuniversities.com/stud...history-degree

    and no problem
    you can do a job completely non-related to the degree, as some employers just like the skills you gain while studying a degree hope you have an idea of what you want to do eventually, but don't stress too much
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    I feel you all the way
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    (Original post by chloebeauchamp)
    I've considered taking a year out, however I was worried I'd have difficulty applying to specific courses that way, as I've read that there are subjects/universities that prefer candidates that apply straight after college. That being said, I can understand how a gap year could be of great benefit and will allow me to decide on what I want to do. Experience in different areas during this time would definitely help with my decision, perhaps it's something I need to think about doing.

    Thank you for your help!!
    Don't worry about that too much - your situation is fairly normal! A lot of people get to the end of A-Levels and have no idea what they want to do with their life, and universities (including the top ones) recognise this. in reality, whatever degree course you might end up studying will very likely have at least a handful of older/mature students studying on it at the same time, who all decided they didn't want to do a degree straight after A-Levels as well

    You mentioned that you considered studying languages, so you could consider seeking a job overseas - which is a much better way to learn a language than just studying it on a course. This would probably work to your advantage in terms of applying to a university language degree, if that's what you decide you want to do.

    Have you considered other career options related to your A-Level subjects which aren't about medicine? For example, Biology puts you in a good position for a career in something related to physical fitness, such as Physiotherapy.

    You said you'd looked at other options that didn't interest you, so I don't know whether you've seen this, but there are descriptions for hundreds of different possible career paths here: https://nationalcareersservice.direc...-profiles/home

    Consider the kinds of things you enjoy in your spare time, and as hobbies, such as anything creative you might enjoy doing; the best career that anyone could ever ask for would be the one where they get paid by someone else for doing their hobby (Assuming the pay is at least comfortable anyway).

    Lastly, don't forget that a degree isn't the only way to get into a career (it's actually a pretty expensive one too really); for example you could look at apprenticeships instead: https://www.gov.uk/apply-apprenticeship
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    If you want to learn a language or even study abroad, you don’t have to study a language degree, by the way. Depending what language you want to learn, it’s totally possible to learn by yourself in your spare time, if you think you’d be able to learn that way. Also, a lot of universities offer language courses to their students that you can do either as optional modules or in addition to your course, often free or significantly discounted. You can also do a year abroad as part of a whole lot of different degrees which will enable you to combine studying one subject with the benefits of studying a language.
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    Which?Uni course finder recommends a number of options with those A levels, from the obvious science routes to a few more left field options, such as anatomy, archeology or dentistry.
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    If you’re not sure, don’t decide. A degree is too big a commitment to make a choice you may regret.
    Given that you’ve thought about medicine you probably are basing that on something, most likely a desire to work with people. But if you’re not so interested in the sciences then it might be worth thinking about what you want to do that doesn’t place such a heavy emphasis on them.
    Medicine is also something that really does require some work experience to truly understand the nature of the job.
    In my field of study, the doctors are basically the ones who put all the data together and crunch it to come to diagnoses and manage care. They don’t spend a massive amount of time with people though. With some obvious exceptions, they’re rarely the ones delivering care directly, though, as that’s not their main role. That can put a lot of people off in the long term. That said, it’s a challenging and rewarding career and I would encourage you to get some insight into it first.
    Have a look at allied health professions I think and maybe something like speech and language therapy if you’ve got that interest in medicine and language but also don’t be afraid of studying something you’re interested in. Most graduate jobs don’t require a specific degree and you’re more likely to do well at something if you’re genuinely interested in it. I did history as a first degree and I’ve got loads out of it and enjoyed it thoroughly while I was doing it. Whilst it wasn’t vocational in the end, it’s never been my degree subject that’s held me back in life. Other things, maybe, but not that.
 
 
 
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