Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    I'm currently Y12 studying psychology, sociology, biology and an EPQ. These are my GCSEs:

    8 - English Literature
    8 - English Language
    A - Geography
    A - Religious Studies
    A - Additional Science
    6 - Maths
    B - Sociology
    B - Core Science
    C - Psychology
    C - Further Additional Science
    C - Spanish

    I'm hoping to go to a Russell Group university if my grades are good enough. I'm not sure what course to do yet.. I'm extremely engrossed by crime, psychology and particularly serial killers. I was thinking criminology, psychology or forensic psychology but to be honest I don't know what is available!

    Can anyone advise me? Thanks
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    It would be helpful if you researched what each job does. Like Criminologists and Forensic Psychologists although both work with crime have fundamentally different roles. To do criminology you will have to choose sociology and to do Forensic Psychology you would have to choose Psychology. Also keep in mind that in Uni you'll do a variety of different courses before you get into crime, for example you do Forensic Psychology in the third year of uni in most cases. You will also need to specialise by doing a Masters. So just do some research and find which one suits you better I want to become a profiler, so I chose Forensic Psychology, as you can combine bio, crime and psychology
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    PPE... you will learn philosophy and it seems like you can do some maths, then you wont be poor....


    theres little to no money in criminology...
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SofiaTW)
    It would be helpful if you researched what each job does. Like Criminologists and Forensic Psychologists although both work with crime have fundamentally different roles. To do criminology you will have to choose sociology and to do Forensic Psychology you would have to choose Psychology. Also keep in mind that in Uni you'll do a variety of different courses before you get into crime, for example you do Forensic Psychology in the third year of uni in most cases. You will also need to specialise by doing a Masters. So just do some research and find which one suits you better I want to become a profiler, so I chose Forensic Psychology, as you can combine bio, crime and psychology
    Being a profiler was my dream job but people were telling me that it's unrealistic..
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Traore)
    I'm currently Y12 studying psychology, sociology, biology and an EPQ. These are my GCSEs:

    8 - English Literature
    8 - English Language
    A - Geography
    A - Religious Studies
    A - Additional Science
    6 - Maths
    B - Sociology
    B - Core Science
    C - Psychology
    C - Further Additional Science
    C - Spanish

    I'm hoping to go to a Russell Group university if my grades are good enough. I'm not sure what course to do yet.. I'm extremely engrossed by crime, psychology and particularly serial killers. I was thinking criminology, psychology or forensic psychology but to be honest I don't know what is available!

    Can anyone advise me? Thanks
    I’m currently in year 13 and I do similar subjects to you biology English lit sociology and politics and I chose to go into law
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Traore)
    Being a profiler was my dream job but people were telling me that it's unrealistic..
    You can be whatever you want to be.
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SofiaTW)
    You can be whatever you want to be.
    I wish it were that easy.

    I didn't work hard for my GCSEs but I regret that, so now I'm trying my best at A-Levels but it's really hard.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Traore)
    I wish it were that easy.

    I didn't work hard for my GCSEs but I regret that, so now I'm trying my best at A-Levels but it's really hard.
    It is possible to resit your GCSEs
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    More important than just “attending a Russel group university” is actually checking to see which university is going to put you in the best position for psychology based specialisation depending on how far you wish to go. I for one put much more emphasis on subject specific league tables as opposed to general university rankings!
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Traore)
    Being a profiler was my dream job but people were telling me that it's unrealistic..
    (Original post by SofiaTW)
    You can be whatever you want to be.
    It is great to cultivate an interest and have dreams about where you want to go but I think you also do have to acknowledge the reality aswell. That job sounds like one at the top of the career ladder. Working your way through the police force and gaining investigation experience is what I would have thought is one of the main ways to try and reach that goal, alongside having postgraduate qualifications and continuing professional development. I believe alot of police vacancies are internal and don't make their way onto their public vacancies pages, so it may be important to just even get your foot in the door as a volunteer or as a member of support staff first. You may also be relying on the fact that you are waiting for a person in that job role to vacate or retire and this can take years!

    -

    To the original poster, we have very similar interests! I am incredibly fascinated by criminals but it is more of a side hobby than a career goal for myself. Still, it's great you've thought about this already.

    I agree that it is important to focus on the quality of teaching for a particular subject of a university rather than just the name. Yes it is likely Russel Group universities will offer the best course but this is not always the case. As you will see below from looking on Prospects, a course that is accredited by the British Psychological Society for Graduate Chartered Membership is the best to aim for for forensic psychology.

    As others have already pointed out, forensic psychology and criminology are different fields. Criminology is purely focused on criminals and the causes and controlling of such behaviours whilst forensic psychologists use psychology in law and court so has some overlap with law. The latter is also not solely focused on criminals but can be based on civil court and other people besides criminals. Psychology in itself is an incredibly competitive field, producing one of the largest pool of graduates every year. Job opportunities are only getting fewer in the sector from what I hear, so you need to understand that gaining relevant work experience and putting in the effort early on.

    I just had a look on Prospects.ac.uk to see what they recommended as the minimum qualifications for a Forensic Psychologist:

    To become a chartered forensic psychologist you will need:
    • Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC), which you can get by completing a British Psychological Society (BPS) accredited degree or conversion course;
    • a BPS-accredited Masters in Forensic Psychology, which may be available on a part-time or distance-learning basis;
    • Stage 2 of the BPS Qualification in Forensic Psychology, which involves a minimum of two years of supervised practice that requires you to provide evidence of applying psychology in forensic practice. It's possible to complete this stage while working as a trainee forensic psychologist.

    I'm aware that Criminology as a degree is popular to people wanting to become police officers through the Police Now Graduate Scheme, probation officers, prison officers and jobs in the social community. I would keep in mind that you may not specifically need a degree in Criminology to go into any of these fields; you may need to do a post conversion course if you do another degree, but you can still apply. With that said, I would advise you to remember that apart from employment prospects of a degree, you need to choose something you enjoy or else those three years are going to be verrryyy long.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by DinoGirl2295)
    It is great to cultivate an interest and have dreams about where you want to go but I think you also do have to acknowledge the reality aswell. That job sounds like one at the top of the career ladder. Working your way through the police force and gaining investigation experience is what I would have thought is one of the main ways to try and reach that goal, alongside having postgraduate qualifications and continuing professional development. I believe alot of police vacancies are internal and don't make their way onto their public vacancies pages, so it may be important to just even get your foot in the door as a volunteer or as a member of support staff first. You may also be relying on the fact that you are waiting for a person in that job role to vacate or retire and this can take years!

    -

    To the original poster, we have very similar interests! I am incredibly fascinated by criminals but it is more of a side hobby than a career goal for myself. Still, it's great you've thought about this already.

    I agree that it is important to focus on the quality of teaching for a particular subject of a university rather than just the name. Yes it is likely Russel Group universities will offer the best course but this is not always the case. As you will see below from looking on Prospects, a course that is accredited by the British Psychological Society for Graduate Chartered Membership is the best to aim for for forensic psychology.

    As others have already pointed out, forensic psychology and criminology are different fields. Criminology is purely focused on criminals and the causes and controlling of such behaviours whilst forensic psychologists use psychology in law and court so has some overlap with law. The latter is also not solely focused on criminals but can be based on civil court and other people besides criminals. Psychology in itself is an incredibly competitive field, producing one of the largest pool of graduates every year. Job opportunities are only getting fewer in the sector from what I hear, so you need to understand that gaining relevant work experience and putting in the effort early on.

    I just had a look on Prospects.ac.uk to see what they recommended as the minimum qualifications for a Forensic Psychologist:

    To become a chartered forensic psychologist you will need:
    • Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC), which you can get by completing a British Psychological Society (BPS) accredited degree or conversion course;
    • a BPS-accredited Masters in Forensic Psychology, which may be available on a part-time or distance-learning basis;
    • Stage 2 of the BPS Qualification in Forensic Psychology, which involves a minimum of two years of supervised practice that requires you to provide evidence of applying psychology in forensic practice. It's possible to complete this stage while working as a trainee forensic psychologist.

    I'm aware that Criminology as a degree is popular to people wanting to become police officers through the Police Now Graduate Scheme, probation officers, prison officers and jobs in the social community. I would keep in mind that you may not specifically need a degree in Criminology to go into any of these fields; you may need to do a post conversion course if you do another degree, but you can still apply. With that said, I would advise you to remember that apart from employment prospects of a degree, you need to choose something you enjoy or else those three years are going to be verrryyy long.
    Yeah I'll make my way up.
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
 
 
 
Poll
Are you going to a festival?
Useful resources

Articles and guides:

Hands typing

Degrees without fees

Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

A-Z of careers Advice on choosing a careerCV writing helpCovering letter helpInterview tips

Featured recruiter profiles:

CGI logo

CGI is open for applications

"Offering a range of apprentice and sponsored degree positions."

Deutsche Bank logo

Deutsche Bank is recruiting

"Thrive in an international banking environment"

ICAEW logo

Merck

"Merck is a global leader in specialized pharma & chemicals – join us!"

Army logo

The Army is recruiting now

"With hundreds of roles available, there’s more than one way to be the best."

Bianca Miller, runner-up on The Apprentice

Handle your digital footprint

What would an employer find out about you on Google? Find out how to take control.

Quick links:

Unanswered career sector and employment threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.