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If gender is indeed a social construct... watch

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    (Original post by RockyDennis)
    If you are a man and you feel convinced you're a woman, that doesn't mean you literally are a woman. You are just a man who feels like a woman... Like that song...

    "Man! I feel like a woman!" DUN DUN DUH-DAHHH DUH DAH!
    You must be a trump supporter
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    Gender is a relatively new and fuzzy concept. It can be used to refer to: Gender identity or Gender stereotypes

    Gender identity is the biological sex you feel you belong to.

    Gender stereotypes are the behaviours that are usually associated with each of the biological sexes.

    Gender identity is certainly a real thing. If gender identity does not match physiological sex this can cause a lot of distress and lead to a mental condition called Gender Identity Disorder.

    Gender stereotypes are much fuzzier as these change a lot between cultures. For example: in western culture a male gender stereotype is that they have short hair, and a female gender stereotype is that they have long hair. Since gender stereotypes are not the same across cultures and likely vary across time they are almost certainly a social construct.
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    (Original post by angelike1)
    ...what does it actually mean to be a "man" or a "woman"?

    I'm a guy and if I say I want to be a "woman", what do I exactly mean by that?
    Sex is biological classification into male or female. Gender is behaviour and thinking associated with sex but not necessarily dependent on it. Another way to say that is that having a penis is a matter of 'sex' but choosing to wear blue socks rather than pink (in some societies) is a matter of 'gender'. The former does not demand the latter.
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    (Original post by marcobruni98)
    Gender is a relatively new and fuzzy concept.
    No it's not. Every society ever known has recognised men and women, and hardly ever anything else.

    Since gender stereotypes are not the same across cultures and likely vary across time they are almost certainly a social construct.
    Some. But many gender stereotypes are very similar across the world (women do more childcare, men do more fighting, aspects of sexuality), suggesting a universal, evolved, biological basis for them.
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    (Original post by chazwomaq)
    No it's not. Every society ever known has recognised men and women, and hardly ever anything else.
    Yes it is.

    "Sexologist John Money introduced the terminological distinction between biological sex and gender as a role in 1955. Before his work, it was uncommon to use the word gender to refer to anything but grammatical categories.[1][2] https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gender

    I didn't say sex didn't exist I said gender as I described it didn't.

    (Original post by chazwomaq)
    Some. But many gender stereotypes are very similar across the world (women do more childcare, men do more fighting, aspects of sexuality), suggesting a universal, evolved, biological basis for them.
    I agree that there is a biological basis for lots of gender stereotypical behaviour (E.g Breastfeeding). I don't think this can explain most differences behaviours associated with men and women. The differences are extremely intricate and there is no way they can be reduced to just sex. For example: men in England aren't expected to ever wear skirts (while women are)... whereas even as close as Scotland men are associated with this...
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    (Original post by marcobruni98)
    Yes it is.

    "Sexologist John Money introduced the terminological distinction between biological sex and gender as a role in 1955. Before his work, it was uncommon to use the word gender to refer to anything but grammatical categories.[1][2] https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gender

    I didn't say sex didn't exist I said gender as I described it didn't.
    So when you said "Gender is a relatively new and fuzzy concept" what you meant what gender as distinct from sex. That is fair enough, and goes to show just how closely linked sex and gender are. In the vast vast majority of cases they are synonymous.


    I agree that there is a biological basis for lots of gender stereotypical behaviour (E.g Breastfeeding). I don't think this can explain most differences behaviours associated with men and women. The differences are extremely intricate and there is no way they can be reduced to just sex. For example: men in England aren't expected to ever wear skirts (while women are)... whereas even as close as Scotland men are associated with this...
    I think we'd have to discuss each case on its merits rather than make broad brush assertions. There are many sex differentiated roles across cultures that are universal, but not all (e.g. matrilineal vs patrilineal societies). Kilts is not the best example though, as women wear kilts too in Scotland.
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    (Original post by chazwomaq)
    So when you said "Gender is a relatively new and fuzzy concept" what you meant what gender as distinct from sex. That is fair enough, and goes to show just how closely linked sex and gender are. In the vast vast majority of cases they are synonymous.




    I think we'd have to discuss each case on its merits rather than make broad brush assertions. There are many sex differentiated roles across cultures that are universal, but not all (e.g. matrilineal vs patrilineal societies). Kilts is not the best example though, as women wear kilts too in Scotland.
    I see now how my comment can be misinterpreted. I agree that they are very closely related.

    Just a thought. You could consider gender stereotypes to be extended phenotypes where the environment/cultural factors play a very important role but still requires the biological difference.

    Regarding kilts, I agree that there are better examples.
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    (Original post by marcobruni98)
    Just a thought. You could consider gender stereotypes to be extended phenotypes where the environment/cultural factors play a very important role but still requires the biological difference.
    Yes, that's a great use of the metaphor!
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    (Original post by HighFructose)
    You must be a trump supporter
    I only support Trump because he makes the type of people I dislike so angry. That brings me pleasure.
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    (Original post by RockyDennis)
    I only support Trump because he makes the type of people I dislike so angry. That brings me pleasure.
    So what you're saying is that I can't be a woman if I feel I'm a woman?

    Defo trump supporter
 
 
 
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