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Computer science career watch

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    I used to have a real passion for wanting to go into a career with computer science, sadly I couldn't deal with the tests in maths , generally with maths i was okay but the tests i believe I can't do too well. I do Business, Psychology and English Lit at A-levels and I was wondering if there was still some way I could get some sort of Computer Science element in to my future degree, such as being able to work with the business side of something but mixed with responsibilities of something such as a programmer. Thanks!
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    (Original post by asadhz)
    I used to have a real passion for wanting to go into a career with computer science, sadly I couldn't deal with the tests in maths , generally with maths i was okay but the tests i believe I can't do too well. I do Business, Psychology and English Lit at A-levels and I was wondering if there was still some way I could get some sort of Computer Science element in to my future degree, such as being able to work with the business side of something but mixed with responsibilities of something such as a programmer. Thanks!
    You can improve maths with practice. Without practice, you cannot improve.

    Depending on your degree you can study programming. Heck, you can do it yourself. E.g. Using the textbook Advanced R by Wickham et al.
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    (Original post by Kevin De Bruyne)
    You can improve maths with practice. Without practice, you cannot improve.

    Depending on your degree you can study programming. Heck, you can do it yourself. E.g. Using the textbook Advanced R by Wickham et al.
    Thank you very much! But I'm already not doing maths anymore so I guess ill just teach myself programming thank you!
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    There are plenty of Computer Science degrees which don't need A-Level maths, see this thread:

    https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=5007920

    In particular, most Programming-related modules at university (and even most programming careers/jobs) involve very little maths beyond basic arithmetic, so I would expect a lot of universities offering a Software Engineering degree (UCAS Code G600) might make you an offer without A-Level maths.('Software Engineer' being the common professional term for a programmer).

    With that said, if you want to teach yourself programming in your spare time, you can go a long way following free courses online at websites like edX, codecademy, or udemy. And if you're willing to pay a bit of money for online courses, then teamtreehouse as well.
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    Do a CS degree at a uni that doesn't ask for maths. Alternatively, practice and self-teach yourself AL Maths (what I did). I got a D at GCSE but ended with an A at A-Level.

    Get a junior software engineer job. If you go to Edinburgh/Imperial/Oxbridge you have the chance of landing a google/amazon/microsoft/apple job straight after university. The big-4 offer starting salaries of £40k and you can have a very long career as a software engineer at those types of companies. Other places you'll max out as a senior software engineer and you'll have to move into technical architecture or mid-upper level management. Either way you should be able to make £80k+ a year when you're middle aged.
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    (Original post by winterscoming)
    There are plenty of Computer Science degrees which don't need A-Level maths, see this thread:

    https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=5007920

    In particular, most Programming-related modules at university (and even most programming careers/jobs) involve very little maths beyond basic arithmetic, so I would expect a lot of universities offering a Software Engineering degree (UCAS Code G600) might make you an offer without A-Level maths.('Software Engineer' being the common professional term for a programmer).

    With that said, if you want to teach yourself programming in your spare time, you can go a long way following free courses online at websites like edX, codecademy, or udemy. And if you're willing to pay a bit of money for online courses, then teamtreehouse as well.
    Thank you so much , I think I'll start teaching myself programming and check out the link, thanks!!
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    (Original post by asadhz)
    Thank you so much , I think I'll start teaching myself programming and check out the link, thanks!!
    In which case, the codecademy Python course is a great place to start just to get yourself started really quickly with the fundamentals of programming (Nothing to download or install for this)
    https://www.codecademy.com/learn/learn-python

    Then this edX course written by some Harvard professors dives a lot more in-depth about more general problem-solving used in programming
    https://www.edx.org/course/cs50s-int...harvardx-cs50x

    Good luck!
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    (Original post by rickyrossman)
    Do a CS degree at a uni that doesn't ask for maths. Alternatively, practice and self-teach yourself AL Maths (what I did). I got a D at GCSE but ended with an A at A-Level.

    Get a junior software engineer job. If you go to Edinburgh/Imperial/Oxbridge you have the chance of landing a google/amazon/microsoft/apple job straight after university. The big-4 offer starting salaries of £40k and you can have a very long career as a software engineer at those types of companies. Other places you'll max out as a senior software engineer and you'll have to move into technical architecture or mid-upper level management. Either way you should be able to make £80k+ a year when you're middle aged.
    Thanks for the advice! However, i've seen some people say that without learning a-level maths, a CS degree may be hard, is this true? Although I stopped with maths, now i understood most concepts in the text book so should i be fine? Again thanks!!
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    (Original post by rickyrossman)
    Do a CS degree at a uni that doesn't ask for maths. Alternatively, practice and self-teach yourself AL Maths (what I did). I got a D at GCSE but ended with an A at A-Level.

    Get a junior software engineer job. If you go to cEdinburgh/Imperial/Oxbridge you have the chance of landing a google/amazon/microsoft/apple job straight after university. The big-4 offer starting salaries of £40k and you can have a very long career as a software engineer at those types of companies. Other places you'll max out as a senior software engineer and you'll have to move into technical architecture or mid-upper level management. Either way you should be able to make £80k+ a year when you're middle aged.
    Thanks so much for the advice! However, I've heard that people may struggle with a CS degree without completing a-level maths , before i stopped with maths I do believe i understood most concepts the text books had to offer, does this mean I'll be fine without a-level maths? Again thanks!
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    (Original post by asadhz)
    Thanks for the advice! However, i've seen some people say that without learning a-level maths, a CS degree may be hard, is this true? Although I stopped with maths, now i understood most concepts in the text book so should i be fine? Again thanks!!
    Yes and no. The thing is with CS degrees is they aren't uniform across universities. One university CS can be purely Java programming and web development. At another university it can be entirely pure mathematics and functional programming (Haskell). Generally the rule of thumb is to look at the entry requirements. If the uni asks for AAB in any subjects with a B in GCSE Maths it won't have much maths at all. On the other hand if they ask for AAA with an A in Maths then the degree will have a significant mathematical component.

    The disadvantage to going to a university that doesn't offer students a strong exposure to mathematics is that it might hinder you during interviews. Companies, especially google/microsoft/amazon/apple, will grill you on your knowledge of problem solving with algorithms and data structures. The time efficient solutions to these problems are not intuitive and are usually rooted in discrete mathematics and theoretical computer science. Note that not all companies interview like this, its usually startups and the big 4 that do this type of gruelling interviews.

    However, once you get into your software engineering job. You won't need much knowledge of mathematics at all. You will need to have a strong understanding of programming and modern libraries. So if you're a web developer, it would be in your interest to read effective javascript and to master the usual javascript frameworks (Node.JS, Passport.JS, etc). Also, despite the programmer stereotype, people skills and management skills are very important as one day you might be leading a group of junior developers. So make sure to keep those sharp.
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    (Original post by rickyrossman)
    Yes and no. The thing is with CS degrees is they aren't uniform across universities. One university CS can be purely Java programming and web development. At another university it can be entirely pure mathematics and functional programming (Haskell). Generally the rule of thumb is to look at the entry requirements. If the uni asks for AAB in any subjects with a B in GCSE Maths it won't have much maths at all. On the other hand if they ask for AAA with an A in Maths then the degree will have a significant mathematical component.

    The disadvantage to going to a university that doesn't offer students a strong exposure to mathematics is that it might hinder you during interviews. Companies, especially google/microsoft/amazon/apple, will grill you on your knowledge of problem solving with algorithms and data structures. The time efficient solutions to these problems are not intuitive and are usually rooted in discrete mathematics and theoretical computer science. Note that not all companies interview like this, its usually startups and the big 4 that do this type of gruelling interviews.

    However, once you get into your software engineering job. You won't need much knowledge of mathematics at all. You will need to have a strong understanding of programming and modern libraries. So if you're a web developer, it would be in your interest to read effective javascript and to master the usual javascript frameworks (Node.JS, Passport.JS, etc). Also, despite the programmer stereotype, people skills and management skills are very important as one day you might be leading a group of junior developers. So make sure to keep those sharp.
    Oh okay i understand, but one thing i was also considering was to do a business management degree, the subject is one i enjoy, and then with that i was wondering if i taught myself programming would i be seen as valuable by companies due to the degree and the programming experience? Sorry to drag it on but thanks so much!
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    (Original post by asadhz)
    Oh okay i understand, but one thing i was also considering was to do a business management degree, the subject is one i enjoy, and then with that i was wondering if i taught myself programming would i be seen as valuable by companies due to the degree and the programming experience? Sorry to drag it on but thanks so much!
    Business management won't teach you the problem solving required for programming. IMHO, the only way you can learn management is by managing people or starting your own business. If you do CS, you could start your own web development consultancy in the summer holidays.
    Some recruiters will not consider you with a business management degree. I've seen graduate schemes for software engineering asking for 'Computer Science or a related STEM degree'
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    (Original post by rickyrossman)
    Business management won't teach you the problem solving required for programming. IMHO, the only way you can learn management is by managing people or starting your own business. If you do CS, you could start your own web development consultancy in the summer holidays.
    Some recruiters will not consider you with a business management degree. I've seen graduate schemes for software engineering asking for 'Computer Science or a related STEM degree'
    Alright thank you!
 
 
 
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