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Anonymous #1
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Report Thread starter 3 years ago
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I'm studying chemistry, biology, physics and maths for A level, am hoping for 4 As at AS then probably 3 As at A2. I think I want to go to university, I'm not sure which one though or which course. Probably Queen's Belfast or one in England.
Do you guys know any jobs to do with science and/or maths that involve travel? Travel is really important to me and if it could be part of my job, that would be amazing. I really have no idea what I want to do with my life. I know I don't have to have my life completely set out but I'd like to have some idea of the direction I'd be going in. Thanks for any suggestions.
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alleycat393
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I'm studying chemistry, biology, physics and maths for A level, am hoping for 4 As at AS then probably 3 As at A2. I think I want to go to university, I'm not sure which one though or which course. Probably Queen's Belfast or one in England.
Do you guys know any jobs to do with science and/or maths that involve travel? Travel is really important to me and if it could be part of my job, that would be amazing. I really have no idea what I want to do with my life. I know I don't have to have my life completely set out but I'd like to have some idea of the direction I'd be going in. Thanks for any suggestions.
Focus on doing something you enjoy and are good at. The travel will come with time and seniority.
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DrSocSciences
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(Original post by alleycat393)
Focus on doing something you enjoy and are good at. The travel will come with time and seniority.
That's true. However, the quality of the experience differs according to whether you target a static overseas job, or a job that involves frequent international travel, or an academic route which involves occasional speaking gigs around the globe. It's not always what it seems.

And to answer the OP's question, marine biology or alternatively anything to do with energy/resources?
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alleycat393
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(Original post by DrSocSciences)
That's true. However, the quality of the experience differs according to whether you target a static overseas job, or a job that involves frequent international travel, or an academic route which involves occasional speaking gigs around the globe. It's not always what it seems.
Exactly and that's something that the OP will work out as they mature, get into the field and work out what their other commitments and circumstances are at the time. These can also change over the course of a career. Good point
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artful_lounger
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As above, earth and (ecological/conservation oriented) biological science courses will involve more fieldwork, which may well involve travelling internationally. Engineering in general, especially chemical, may as well involve site visits and so on. Of course this may not actually require you to be living abroad - it's entirely possible to live and work in an office/university in the UK but periodically go on field trips and site visits abroad in the course of this work.

However generally in any STEM area you can reasonably look for jobs abroad - these are normally the "skilled worker" areas other countries are looking to sponsor visas for, so you won't be wanting for opportunities if you get a good first degree and can demonstrate good credentials in your area of expertise (e.g. higher degrees, especially getting your PhD, but beyond that at least relevant work in fieldwork/dissertation/thesis/project modules/papers/opportunities). At the moment you should focus on just pursuing the subject(s) you enjoy the most, doing well in them, pursuing any relevant projects beyond the usual curriculum as and when the opportunity arises (internships, placements, summer research projects, etc, etc) and once you are nearing the "finish line" so to speak, come back to this and see what might be possible.
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Aseraphi
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Aseraphi
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Hello, some food for thought here. I studied neuroscience BSc, I undertook the degree course simply because I thought it sounded interesting (I had no set ideas what I wanted to do except travel with my job (which I hoped would be involved in science)).
I did some lab experience at uni and immediately knew that it wasn't for me. Fast forward a couple of years and odd jobs later- I currently travel the world with my job and I work in science.
I install microscopes and experimental systems in labs worldwide as a Field Service Engineer/ Installation engineer. I learnt everything on the job, even how to align lasers and I have the opportunity to meet many people, learn about what is currently happening in neuroscience research and I get to travel and see many awesome places- all paid!There are many Field service engineering jobs or Application specialist roles or even scientific sales roles that allow you to travel extensively. Microscopes or science based companies will have the budgets for this and the need, also laser companies if you decided to go down the physics and maths route.Engineering internships in said companies could also be a great way to get your foot in the door if one of these companies and then you can diversify.I hope that helps! Enjoy the journey and keep looking
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