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    ... I took an empty exercise book and started creating "my own revision guide" of condensed notes for each topic.

    I got to proteins, filled the page with notes and then filled the next page about enzymes...

    .. but I forgot to write about a-helix and B-pleated sheet!

    Now there's no room to add it in and I don't know what to do
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    Damn thats huge you might fail your exams cuz of that be careful next time
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    Seriously? Draw an arrow or a star or something to the next page? Write it on a separate piece of paper and put it in? COMMON SENSE
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    Seriously was my first though as well. In the time it took you to post you could have simply made an insert and attached it / stapled it to the page and panic over.

    This is why people use ring binders and lever arch files..

    Will you be telling us about further mistakes of such magnitude? maybe you could have a mistakes blog?
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    omds looool.
    You gonna fail bruh
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    (Original post by Traore)
    ... I took an empty exercise book and started creating "my own revision guide" of condensed notes for each topic.

    I got to proteins, filled the page with notes and then filled the next page about enzymes...

    .. but I forgot to write about a-helix and B-pleated sheet!

    Now there's no room to add it in and I don't know what to do
    as someone who got 96% UMS in my A level biology I can tell you you're doing it wrong and wasting your time anyway. every minute you spend writing notes is a minute lost memorising new info.

    you should be only making notes as a 'cue' to remind you of an aspect you keep forgetting of, like "b-pleated sheet and a-helix" is all you need to write for those two things, as you keep forgetting them.
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    (Original post by CollectiveSoul)
    as someone who got 96% UMS in my A level biology I can tell you you're doing it wrong and wasting your time anyway. every minute you spend writing notes is a minute lost memorising new info.

    you should be only making notes as a 'cue' to remind you of an aspect you keep forgetting of, like "b-pleated sheet and a-helix" is all you need to write for those two things, as you keep forgetting them.
    Do you realise that every person is different and has different revision methods? Just because you think it's a waste of time, others don't. Yes, congratulations on your mark but come down from your high horse and let others revise how they do best.
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    Onenote is the way forward my friends!
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    I agree wid you
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    Try writing it on a single page or two separately then paperclipping the pages to where they should be in the book?
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    (Original post by DrawTheLine)
    Do you realise that every person is different and has different revision methods? Just because you think it's a waste of time, others don't. Yes, congratulations on your mark but come down from your high horse and let others revise how they do best.
    i'm afraid the tendency to make notes on everything is more down to students believing that this is the only way of learning, rather than it being somehow a style which suits some people. i am speaking from experience as i made notes on literally every detail until i realised it was a waste of time

    notes should only be there as cues, style or no style, the OPs time is being wasted.
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    (Original post by CollectiveSoul)
    as someone who got 96% UMS in my A level biology I can tell you you're doing it wrong and wasting your time anyway. every minute you spend writing notes is a minute lost memorising new info.

    you should be only making notes as a 'cue' to remind you of an aspect you keep forgetting of, like "b-pleated sheet and a-helix" is all you need to write for those two things, as you keep forgetting them.
    Then what is your proposed method of revision?
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    (Original post by CollectiveSoul)
    i'm afraid the tendency to make notes on everything is more down to students believing that this is the only way of learning, rather than it being somehow a style which suits some people. i am speaking from experience as i made notes on literally every detail until i realised it was a waste of time

    before i learnt that notes should only be there as cues, style or no style, the OPs time is being wasted.
    I'm speaking from experience too, and got me an A* in psychology. Everyone is different and revises differently. Don't assume someone doesn't know what they're doing just because they're revising in a way you disagree with. Sure, maybe it isn't the right style for the OP but they haven't given any indication of that, so it is possible it is the best style for them.
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    (Original post by CollectiveSoul)
    as someone who got 96% UMS in my A level biology I can tell you you're doing it wrong and wasting your time anyway. every minute you spend writing notes is a minute lost memorising new info.

    you should be only making notes as a 'cue' to remind you of an aspect you keep forgetting of, like "b-pleated sheet and a-helix" is all you need to write for those two things, as you keep forgetting them.
    A level is linear now ...
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    Use a sticky note
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    Then what is your proposed method of revision?
    notes should only be there as cues. so for example, you may need to write a detailed explanation of what an alpha-helix is, but in an essay you may even forget to include the bit about alpha-helices.

    so all you need to do for your notes is write "alpha-helix" and then that will remind you to spew out all the detail you know about that from memory.

    the reason you shouldn't be including all that detail in your notes, is because that's what your textbook/class notes should have in them already, so its a waste of time duplicating what you've already got in print or on lecture slides
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    (Original post by CollectiveSoul)
    notes should only be there as cues. so for example, you may need to write a detailed explanation of what an alpha-helix is, but in an essay you may even forget to include the bit about alpha-helices.

    so all you need to do for your notes is write "alpha-helix and then that wil remind you to spew out all the detail you know about that from memory.

    the reason you shouldn't be including all that detail in your notes, is because that's what your textbook/class notes should have in them already, so its a waste of time duplicating what you've already got in print or on lecture slides
    Well what do you think is the best way to get the information from your textbooks/class notes into your head,doesn't writing notes help you get the information into your head?
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    (Original post by CollectiveSoul)
    i'm afraid the tendency to make notes on everything is more down to students believing that this is the only way of learning, rather than it being somehow a style which suits some people. i am speaking from experience as i made notes on literally every detail until i realised it was a waste of time

    notes should only be there as cues, style or no style, the OPs time is being wasted.
    People learn in different ways. Just because it wasnt as effective for you doesnt prevent it working for other people.
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    Well what do you think is the best way to get the information from your textbooks/class notes into your head,doesn't writing notes help you get the information into your head?
    if it does, then very slowly as it takes a long time to write, but then if youre busy writing you're not paying 100% attention anyway.

    the way you get the information into your head is by almighty repetition. i read my class notes/textbook over and over and over and over again.

    at first it would take me hours to take it all in: reading through my whole textbook could take 2 weeks. but then after the 10th time i'd be able to re-read the textbook in a matter of hours. i remember re-reading one chapter in 3 minutes because i'd read it so many times.

    and then i smashed my exams and it felt great to get all 5 of my university choices
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    (Original post by CollectiveSoul)
    as someone who got 96% UMS in my A level biology I can tell you you're doing it wrong and wasting your time anyway. every minute you spend writing notes is a minute lost memorising new info.

    you should be only making notes as a 'cue' to remind you of an aspect you keep forgetting of, like "b-pleated sheet and a-helix" is all you need to write for those two things, as you keep forgetting them.
    I got 200/200 UMS in my AS Biology and the majority of my revision time was dedicated to making notes, it worked very well for me. Different revision techniques suit different people
 
 
 
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