bluemuffin
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Hey guys 👋
Doing ad-maths fsmq course this year (ocr), exam on 19th June. Just started the course (quite late I realise), finding it fine so far, and kinda enjoying the extra stretch; it’s a lot more interesting. I’m finding it significantly harder than the normal maths gcse, but it’s manageable. Anyone else doing it — how are you finding it?
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bfm.mcdermott
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Hi!
I'm doing Admaths too! I agree, some of the topics a lot harder than GCSE, but I find it more interesting and it's not as bad as it could be (it takes work, but it's not impossible).

We finish the course next lesson, and then we're onto Admaths and GCSE revision - I know some people take GCSE maths in Year 10 and then Admaths in Year 11, but we are doing them both this year... The only annoying thing is not being able to use what we're learning e.g. calculus in the GCSE papers!

What chapter are you up to at the moment?
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desert_fairy
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hey, we've finished the course in class and are revising it atm though I don't get the mark scheme a lot, with the B1 F1... wot
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eeeli
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I’m doing the OCR Additional Maths FSMQ too and it’s a nightmare. I understand the stuff in the lessons but I feel like I would be able to just do it in an exam. Guess I’ve got a lot of revision to do... We’re pretty lucky this year I think because they’ve not updated the spec for it yet but maths GCSE has been updated so there’s more overlap (at least this is good for me as we have such short and infrequent FSMQ lessons!)
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bluemuffin
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(Original post by eeeli)
I’m doing the OCR Additional Maths FSMQ too and it’s a nightmare. I understand the stuff in the lessons but I feel like I would be able to just do it in an exam. Guess I’ve got a lot of revision to do... We’re pretty lucky this year I think because they’ve not updated the spec for it yet but maths GCSE has been updated so there’s more overlap (at least this is good for me as we have such short and infrequent FSMQ lessons!)
Yes we've finished the spec now and it wasn't that bad. I'm kinda struggling with kinematics though so I have quite a lot of revision to do for my mock next week!
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bluemuffin
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(Original post by bfm.mcdermott)
Hi!
I'm doing Admaths too! I agree, some of the topics a lot harder than GCSE, but I find it more interesting and it's not as bad as it could be (it takes work, but it's not impossible).

We finish the course next lesson, and then we're onto Admaths and GCSE revision - I know some people take GCSE maths in Year 10 and then Admaths in Year 11, but we are doing them both this year... The only annoying thing is not being able to use what we're learning e.g. calculus in the GCSE papers!

What chapter are you up to at the moment?
We've finished it and are now revising with past papers yay!
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eeeli
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(Original post by bluemuffin)
Yes we've finished the spec now and it wasn't that bad. I'm kinda struggling with kinematics though so I have quite a lot of revision to do for my mock next week!
I haven't actually seen a past paper yet, we've not had time to do a mock. Do you know where I can find some past papers by any chance?
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bluemuffin
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Try searching online, I’m sure there are lots of past papers as they haven’t changed the spec in ages
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gdunne42
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(Original post by eeeli)
I haven't actually seen a past paper yet, we've not had time to do a mock. Do you know where I can find some past papers by any chance?
You will find past papers on the ocr web site
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agk112
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me too! we have done everything apart from kinematics. and i also feel like i understand it fine in class but not sure about in an exam !!
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FreedomOfFalling
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I’m doing admaths as well, my school doesn’t offer it as a course so I’ve been self teaching most of it. I’ve learnt all of the course, and I’m averaging 90+ on most mocks.

Anyone have any tips for Linear Programming? I can never seem to find the optimal solution properly
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Mona123456
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(Original post by FreedomOfFalling)
I’m doing admaths as well, my school doesn’t offer it as a course so I’ve been self teaching most of it. I’ve learnt all of the course, and I’m averaging 90+ on most mocks.

Anyone have any tips for Linear Programming? I can never seem to find the optimal solution properly

Hmmm... for linear programming, it sounds obvious, but make sure you get the graphs drawn right. There's nothing worse then drawing the worng inequalities, that's for sure! I'd say use comon sense as well - points at 0,0 or any points where one of the co-ordinates is 0 can often be elimintated by common sense, and higher up points with the same x co-ordniate but higher y co-ordinate are also clearly going to give you the maximum income (or maximum of whatever the question is asking for). Other than that, I'd just try and check the final solution and make sure it seems realistic. Also, if you can use the method of drawing the objective function then moving the line back (ensuring it's parallel) it can be a lot faster than solving ridiculous simultaneous equations... but it depends on the question. If you're getting 90+ on mocks though, I don't think you've got anything to worry about.

Out of interest, does anyone have any tips for binomial probability questions? Everything else is somewhat logical but I can never decipher what I'm supposed to do for any of the binomial questions... we learnt it ages ago and I've completely forgotten any formulae we need to use, ugh. Any tips would be much appreciated!
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FreedomOfFalling
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(Original post by Mona123456)
Hmmm... for linear programming, it sounds obvious, but make sure you get the graphs drawn right. There's nothing worse then drawing the worng inequalities, that's for sure! I'd say use comon sense as well - points at 0,0 or any points where one of the co-ordinates is 0 can often be elimintated by common sense, and higher up points with the same x co-ordniate but higher y co-ordinate are also clearly going to give you the maximum income (or maximum of whatever the question is asking for). Other than that, I'd just try and check the final solution and make sure it seems realistic. Also, if you can use the method of drawing the objective function then moving the line back (ensuring it's parallel) it can be a lot faster than solving ridiculous simultaneous equations... but it depends on the question. If you're getting 90+ on mocks though, I don't think you've got anything to worry about.

Out of interest, does anyone have any tips for binomial probability questions? Everything else is somewhat logical but I can never decipher what I'm supposed to do for any of the binomial questions... we learnt it ages ago and I've completely forgotten any formulae we need to use, ugh. Any tips would be much appreciated!
I've tried the parallel line method, and I can never seem to get it to work properly. Usually I just go with the vertex, but quite often it doesn't lie perfectly on the line which makes it even more difficult.

For binomial probability, the formula you need to remember is nCr*pr*qn-r, although usually, I just remember to raise the probability of what you want to the number of times you want it, and then work from there (Dunno if that makes any sense, lol)

I found a revision guide on Tes, I basically taught myself it through this pdf, it's pretty good for everything apart from linear programming. Here's the link if any of you want it: https://drive.google.com/open?id=16h...UUucLjzE7OtFzh
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Mona123456
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(Original post by FreedomOfFalling)
I've tried the parallel line method, and I can never seem to get it to work properly. Usually I just go with the vertex, but quite often it doesn't lie perfectly on the line which makes it even more difficult.

For binomial probability, the formula you need to remember is nCr*pr*qn-r, although usually, I just remember to raise the probability of what you want to the number of times you want it, and then work from there (Dunno if that makes any sense, lol)

I found a revision guide on Tes, I basically taught myself it through this pdf, it's pretty good for everything apart from linear programming. Here's the link if any of you want it: https://drive.google.com/open?id=16h...UUucLjzE7OtFzh
Thanks for the link to the revision guide, it looks really useful!

Hmm, if you don't like the parallel line method that's absolutely fine, although if you have a vague idea of what to do then it can be a useful way to check your answer. If you can never get the vertex method accurately, you should be able to if you do simultaneous equations for the two lines where the vertex is. Often, people do read the vertex co-ordinates off the graph and it can become quickly inaccurate. If you definitely want to use the vertex method, just practice drawing the inequalities on correctly (and get the pesky shading right), finding the possible co-ordinates, use logic to remove ones that obviously won't maximise the objective function, then use simultaneous equations to be as accurate as possible. You will have a calculator in the exam (thank goodness, or else we'd all be in trouble lol) so take your time solving the equations then use your calculator to get the accurate solutions. If you have time, I'd also recommend checking your solution - ideally if you can use the objective function line method, it does work and it can save you a lot of working if you use it in the first place, but if not, just make sure you sub your answers into the original equations and see if your e.g. income seems reasonable.

To be honest, linear programming is a bit of a chore but it is really useful and if you keep practising, you should get the hang of it. If you have the OCR Add Maths textbook, there are plenty of questions to have a go at in there, and answers are included so you can check your inequality graph.

That being said, if you're averaging 90+ then not being able to do one question in the exam won't stop you from getting an A. But, if you can understand everything else there's no reason why you can't understand linear programming, so just practice. Although I don't use them myself for Maths, it might also be worth trying a YouTube search as you might find that there are videos explaining it (I would try and explain it fully but if you're getting 90+ on papers you're probably a better Mathematician than me, and I'm not great at explaining things!). That being said, feel free to PM me and I can try and explain it properly if you want. I'd just recommend practicing, and when in doubt, try and use simultaneous equations
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FreedomOfFalling
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(Original post by Mona123456)
Thanks for the link to the revision guide, it looks really useful!

Hmm, if you don't like the parallel line method that's absolutely fine, although if you have a vague idea of what to do then it can be a useful way to check your answer. If you can never get the vertex method accurately, you should be able to if you do simultaneous equations for the two lines where the vertex is. Often, people do read the vertex co-ordinates off the graph and it can become quickly inaccurate. If you definitely want to use the vertex method, just practice drawing the inequalities on correctly (and get the pesky shading right), finding the possible co-ordinates, use logic to remove ones that obviously won't maximise the objective function, then use simultaneous equations to be as accurate as possible. You will have a calculator in the exam (thank goodness, or else we'd all be in trouble lol) so take your time solving the equations then use your calculator to get the accurate solutions. If you have time, I'd also recommend checking your solution - ideally if you can use the objective function line method, it does work and it can save you a lot of working if you use it in the first place, but if not, just make sure you sub your answers into the original equations and see if your e.g. income seems reasonable.

To be honest, linear programming is a bit of a chore but it is really useful and if you keep practising, you should get the hang of it. If you have the OCR Add Maths textbook, there are plenty of questions to have a go at in there, and answers are included so you can check your inequality graph.

That being said, if you're averaging 90+ then not being able to do one question in the exam won't stop you from getting an A. But, if you can understand everything else there's no reason why you can't understand linear programming, so just practice. Although I don't use them myself for Maths, it might also be worth trying a YouTube search as you might find that there are videos explaining it (I would try and explain it fully but if you're getting 90+ on papers you're probably a better Mathematician than me, and I'm not great at explaining things!). That being said, feel free to PM me and I can try and explain it properly if you want. I'd just recommend practicing, and when in doubt, try and use simultaneous equations
Thanks for the hint about simultaneous equations, I’d never really considered solving to see where the lines cross lol. I tried some practise questions and it definetly makes it a lot easier, I think knowing where they cross means you have an idea of what numbers should work.

Since I’m also doing AQA Further Maths, I’ve covered a lot of the basics (differentiation, trig identities and equations) so there actually hasn’t been to much to learn; the worst bits have been integration, binomial expansion and linear programming. Kinda aiming to get 95+/100 on the real thing, I’m pretty confident that I’ll get an A, I just basically want to do better than the other person doing it at my school (she’s annoyingly good)
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thekidwhogames
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I'm in year 11 - if anyone wants any help with FMSQ Maths, let me know. I'm not taking it but I know the content as it's part of something else that I'm doing.

Some tips:

Calculus:
- don't forget the constant of integration if you're finding an indefinite integral (e.g. finding y from dy/dx using a given point as well)
- when calculating definite integrals (and areas), you don't need the constant
- make sure to integrate properly and substitute limits properly to calculate areas; also for some area questions, think about adding a straight line or something and then finding area of trapezium/triangle etc as this can help solve the harder ones

Algebra:
- learn about the discriminant; b^2-4ac and how this relates to roots of a quadratic
- learn both methods for factoring higher degree polynomials; long division and by identities
- learn the binomial theorem and Pascal's triangle (and being able to reason why some terms can be ignored if x is small as well as use binomial theorem to make reasonable approximations)
- factor theorem and using it properly

- for trigonometry, CAST is especially helpful (or the graph)
- if you're solving a trig equation whereby the argument is (2x) but your range of x is given e.g. 0<x<360 then find the new range for 2x e.g. 0<2x<720
- some trivial trig identities may be useful: sin(-x)=-sin(x), cos(-x)=cos(x), tan(-x)=-tan(x); the Pythagorean ones; tanx=sinx/cosx;

Statistics/mechanics:
- learn SUVAT and variable acceleration in mechanics e.g. using calculus
- binomial distribution and properties
- using it in questions e.g. where a random variable is binomially distributed and being able to use the formula properly using ncr
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Mona123456
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(Original post by FreedomOfFalling)
Thanks for the hint about simultaneous equations, I’d never really considered solving to see where the lines cross lol. I tried some practise questions and it definetly makes it a lot easier, I think knowing where they cross means you have an idea of what numbers should work.

Since I’m also doing AQA Further Maths, I’ve covered a lot of the basics (differentiation, trig identities and equations) so there actually hasn’t been to much to learn; the worst bits have been integration, binomial expansion and linear programming. Kinda aiming to get 95+/100 on the real thing, I’m pretty confident that I’ll get an A, I just basically want to do better than the other person doing it at my school (she’s annoyingly good)
You're welcome

AQA Further Maths... is that the one where you can get A**? My cousin did it last year and he got an A** (or A* with Distinction, whatever it's called!). I'm doing Edexcel 9-1 Maths and then OCR FSMQ Add Maths, so there really isn't a whole lot of overlap... pretty much everything we had to be taught, the only "overlap" so to speak was calculus basics. Personally, I sometimes find it annoying how you can't use Add Maths in normal Maths... using a bit of differentiation would definitely speed up some of the harder GCSE questions!

I'm aiming for an A as well - although, I'd be happy with a B. I love Maths, and Add Maths, I'm just honestly not sure how I'll do in the exam! I feel like in lessons, I can do some of the Add Maths questions, but at home I'm like, how did I do that? I find SUVAT, kinematics and all the acceleration stuff fun, and I really like calculus, I just sometimes can never figure out what they're asking me... but, I did my first full past paper yesterday, and I got 78/100 which isn't bad... it was the June 2012 paper and the boundary for an A was 64/100 so I'm feeling a bit more confident. I think I just need to keep practicing - I feel like it was a fluke, and the best prep for any sort of Maths exam is just practice, practice, practice!

Good luck! Getting 95+/100 will be tough, but if you've managed to pretty much self teach yourself the whole course, you must be a very good Mathematician, so anything's certainly possible!
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agk112
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i just did my first full paper (the 2002 one) but i only got 65/100 and im aiming for an A ;( i can do everything in practice but there are some questions where im not sure what it is actually asking me to do so not sure how to go about it!! any tips?
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bluemuffin
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(Original post by agk112)
i just did my first full paper (the 2002 one) but i only got 65/100 and im aiming for an A ;( i can do everything in practice but there are some questions where im not sure what it is actually asking me to do so not sure how to go about it!! any tips?
That’s really good for a first try! Just practise some more questions and work quickly because it’s kinda time-pressured. Do you know roughly what the grade boundaries are?
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FreedomOfFalling
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(Original post by agk112)
i just did my first full paper (the 2002 one) but i only got 65/100 and im aiming for an A ;( i can do everything in practice but there are some questions where im not sure what it is actually asking me to do so not sure how to go about it!! any tips?
Usually the A boundary lies somewhere around 60-70, so if you didn't get an A you definitely weren't far away.
If you can find it, have a look through the examiners report; see where other people went wrong. Also make sure you look through your paper to find out why you lost marks. Usually the section B questions can be really weird questions, you can only really just look at old papers and try to work out what to do for all of them
Where did you find the 2002 paper? The earliest I can find is the 2003 paper
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