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Difference between standing waves and transverse waves watch

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    I still don't understand the difference between them, and I don't get why standing waves transfer no energy; isn't the work done to the surroundings?

    Also, what, in terms of phases makes the nodes on a standing waves different to the "points" on a transverse wave?

    I'll quote the question and answer in my textbook that confuses me:
    "Explain how the variation of amplitude along a string differs from that of a progressive wave.
    Answer: When the string forms a standing wave, the amplitude varies from a maximum at the antinodes and zero at the nodes. In a progressive wave all points vibrate at the same amplitude."

    In short; I don't get standing waves and how they differ to transverse waves.
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    The nodes are always in the same place on a standing wave. There is zero oscillation therefore zero energy transfer at this point. Rather than the energy being trasferred from place to place, as with a travelling wave, it builds up at the points where the antinodes are.

    If you can watch a transverse wave (if it's slow enough) you will see that the positions of minimum and maxmum amplitude change as the wave moves.

    Perhaps you are confused by the terminology.

    Waves can be either transverse or longitudinal AND they can be either travelling or standing/stationary.

    Both transverse and longitudinal waves can produce standing waves.
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    (Original post by phys981)
    The nodes are always in the same place on a standing wave. There is zero oscillation therefore zero energy transfer at this point. Rather than the energy being trasferred from place to place, as with a travelling wave, it builds up at the points where the antinodes are.

    If you can watch a transverse wave (if it's slow enough) you will see that the positions of minimum and maxmum amplitude change as the wave moves.

    Perhaps you are confused by the terminology.

    Waves can be either transverse or longitudinal AND they can be either travelling or standing/stationary.

    Both transverse and longitudinal waves can produce standing waves.
    So every point on a progressive wave has the SAME amplitude, even though the graph says otherwise? Can you think of the graph as some sort of snapshot?
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    Yes, the graph is a snapshot, either in time or in space.
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    (Original post by phys981)
    yes, the graph is a snapshot, either in time or in space.
    thank you thank you thank you.
 
 
 
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