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    TL;DR I'm having a breakdown, hate my university, not a fan of lab work but would like to do a masters. Is anyone here doing the ou for a biology/biochem course and how is it?

    Sorry for long post! I'm a second year biochemistry (but heavily weighted to bio) in my 20s, I'm struggling with depression and anxiety and slightly screwing my life up due to uni stress and financial difficulties.

    I also 100% want to finish my degree, I also 100% do not want to work in a lab. I want to (possibly) do a masters in science policy after this. My dilemma is what to do about my final year, I'm genuinely concerned (as are others) about my declining mental health, I miss working full time and I HATE the area and uni I'm in.

    My question is if I finish my degree on the open uni would it be seen as okay for non lab based post grad? Would employer's see that as okay? I've done 30 credits at a lower level with open uni in a different subject before and my grades were far better than the absolute disaster (2.2) I'm having at this uni due to stress and my mental health.
    My other option is to attempt to transfer to a local uni but the ones I've talked to want me to repeat second year so the modules match, in all honesty I'd rather not drag the uni experience out any longer as I miss working etc.

    One major final question has anyone done the open or natural science degree? It looks likely I can transfer all my credits or most to the open, has anyone done this? How was the course? I love the theory of my subject but honestly not the labs or the disorganization of my university. Did you find it interesting?

    TIA
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    What uni are you in now?
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    (Original post by Phillip Banks)
    What uni are you in now?
    Herts.
    I was at the uea before, did well (just missed a 1.1) and for the most part enjoyed it I thought this would be a similar experience in a subject I enjoy but I was very wrong. This is my second degree so I'm self funded and spending 1000s for no support or particularly useful lectures/learning resources. I've spoken to my head of year and she said several others have moved to the ou in previous years so I'm thinking this may be a better route for me mentally if a much less practical degree.
    My concern is in science would this be seen as a "lesser" degree and how different is the course content in style? How was level 3 at the ou?
    Since posting I've found ou past papers which look considerably more my style of learning but switching at this late point would be a huge leap in course content.
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    (Original post by Smudged18)
    Herts.
    I was at the uea before, did well (just missed a 1.1) and for the most part enjoyed it I thought this would be a similar experience in a subject I enjoy but I was very wrong. This is my second degree so I'm self funded and spending 1000s for no support or particularly useful lectures/learning resources. I've spoken to my head of year and she said several others have moved to the ou in previous years so I'm thinking this may be a better route for me mentally if a much less practical degree.
    My concern is in science would this be seen as a "lesser" degree and how different is the course content in style? How was level 3 at the ou?
    Since posting I've found ou past papers which look considerably more my style of learning but switching at this late point would be a huge leap in course content.
    Arts with the OU are fine, the nature of distance study with the OU is not detrimental to practicality (because they don't have any).
    Science obviously does, what do you intend on doing with your degree? I know teachers and researchers for example with OU degrees.
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    (Original post by Phillip Banks)
    Arts with the OU are fine, the nature of distance study with the OU is not detrimental to practicality (because they don't have any).
    Science obviously does, what do you intend on doing with your degree? I know teachers and researchers for example with OU degrees.

    Looking at a master in public health or ethics/policy.
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    (Original post by Smudged18)
    Looking at a master in public health or ethics/policy.
    A degree from the OU should be fine for the MA courses you want to do.
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    (Original post by Smudged18)
    TL;DR I'm having a breakdown, hate my university, not a fan of lab work but would like to do a masters. Is anyone here doing the ou for a biology/biochem course and how is it?

    Sorry for long post! I'm a second year biochemistry (but heavily weighted to bio) in my 20s, I'm struggling with depression and anxiety and slightly screwing my life up due to uni stress and financial difficulties.

    I also 100% want to finish my degree, I also 100% do not want to work in a lab. I want to (possibly) do a masters in science policy after this. My dilemma is what to do about my final year, I'm genuinely concerned (as are others) about my declining mental health, I miss working full time and I HATE the area and uni I'm in.

    My question is if I finish my degree on the open uni would it be seen as okay for non lab based post grad? Would employer's see that as okay? I've done 30 credits at a lower level with open uni in a different subject before and my grades were far better than the absolute disaster (2.2) I'm having at this uni due to stress and my mental health.
    My other option is to attempt to transfer to a local uni but the ones I've talked to want me to repeat second year so the modules match, in all honesty I'd rather not drag the uni experience out any longer as I miss working etc.

    One major final question has anyone done the open or natural science degree? It looks likely I can transfer all my credits or most to the open, has anyone done this? How was the course? I love the theory of my subject but honestly not the labs or the disorganization of my university. Did you find it interesting?

    TIA
    The Open degree isn't a course as such. It is just a name of the degree because you can choose your own modules. I have ended up on the Open degree because I couldn't transfer to the newest Nat Sci degree and have done just biology modules to complete my degree. There are virtual labs and optional (additional cost) lab courses once a year so you can get some experience if you want to.

    Having a degree from the OU shouldn't stop you getting on a master's. But if you're worried then contact the admission depts of unis you might want to go to.
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    (Original post by SuperCat007)
    The Open degree isn't a course as such. It is just a name of the degree because you can choose your own modules. I have ended up on the Open degree because I couldn't transfer to the newest Nat Sci degree and have done just biology modules to complete my degree. There are virtual labs and optional (additional cost) lab courses once a year so you can get some experience if you want to.

    Having a degree from the OU shouldn't stop you getting on a master's. But if you're worried then contact the admission depts of unis you might want to go to.
    Thank you!

    Im also thinking natsci may be a stretch with my modules so far.
    How are you find the course? Interesting? I'e
    Run through some previous exam papers for a couple of modules and they look quite interesting.
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    (Original post by Smudged18)
    Thank you!

    Im also thinking natsci may be a stretch with my modules so far.
    How are you find the course? Interesting? I'e
    Run through some previous exam papers for a couple of modules and they look quite interesting.
    Well as I said it isn't a course as such. You pick modules to put towards the degree. All the module information is on the OU website. But as with anything, bits are interesting, bits aren't. I can't wait for it to be over, but equally I'm not sure what I'll do when it is. There are FD groups for most modules and degree courses at the OU. Lots of people join them so that is a good place to get information.
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    (Original post by SuperCat007)
    The Open degree isn't a course as such. It is just a name of the degree because you can choose your own modules. I have ended up on the Open degree because I couldn't transfer to the newest Nat Sci degree and have done just biology modules to complete my degree. There are virtual labs and optional (additional cost) lab courses once a year so you can get some experience if you want to.

    Having a degree from the OU shouldn't stop you getting on a master's. But if you're worried then contact the admission depts of unis you might want to go to.
    Irrelevant to science, but no uni has ever criticized the prospect of my possibly joining them for MA study. This includes the likes of Durham and Manchester.
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    (Original post by Phillip Banks)
    Irrelevant to science, but no uni has ever criticized the prospect of my possibly joining them for MA study. This includes the likes of Durham and Manchester.
    Both courses I'm looking at are msci which is my concern. Should have said science and technology policy or public health are bith msci courses.
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    (Original post by Smudged18)
    Both courses I'm looking at are msci which is my concern. Should have said science and technology policy or public health are bith msci courses.

    As I've already said, ask the admissions departments to be sure and check what they really want to see on their application forms. I doubt any uni would discriminate on paper against the OU, but it is useful to know exactly what they are looking for when you come to applying.
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    admissions are very helpful.
    I start my degree in October with ou and I plan to teach so I've been in contact with my 4 local providers and each have been useful in helping me pick the correct degree of two (maths or maths and statistics) so that I qualify for their teaching course, as without contacting them I wouldn't have known that I need over 50% maths to teach maths.
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