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Even being Pro-Trump didn't lose my as many friends as being Pro-Brexit did watch

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    I've always found Delingpole to be an insufferable old boor and this piece really does drive home my conviction for that.
    The man is utterly a waste of Oxygen [or bytes in this case] how he cant understand why people would find him a complete **** for his steadfast conviction in rogering the UK is somewhat beyond me. Although I imagine in this case the fact he is a far right, pro trump hooligan might have also contributed to people removing themselves from his presence.


    When I mentioned on social media recently that I’d lost friends because of Brexit, I was quite surprised by the vehemence of the response. Lots of fellow Leavers had stories to tell about friends who now cut them dead or former clients who would no longer work with them. Many said they prefer to keep secret how they voted in the referendum for fear of the repercussions.
    This intolerance is especially bad if you’re a student. One undergraduate described to me how his politics professor had opened a lecture with a slide reading ‘Brexit is shit’ — apparently ‘to the cheers and adulation of the entire lecture theatre’. Another student interviewed by the BBC a few months ago, described how she had overheard two students talking about her as they left a lecture: ‘I just want to punch that Brexit *****.’
    If you do what I do for a living, you learn to treat this level of aggression and vitriol as a badge of honour. But non-journalists, quite understandably, find it hard to get used to such unpleasantness. This is why I so greatly admire the group of academics who have just outed themselves by launching a website called Briefings for Brexit. One of its purposes is to counter the prevailing orthodoxy that people only voted Brexit if they were really, really thick.
    I know Professor Robert Tombs, one of the two Cambridge dons who founded the group. He’s a delightful chap — modest, mild-mannered and definitely not the type wantonly to court aggro or controversy. So it must have required huge resources of courage and moral principle to stick his head above the parapet in this way — especially when he lives and works in one of Remain’s biggest strongholds.
    Will his former friends who voted Remain ever forgive him? Not in my experience they won’t. This I find bizarre. I often take unfashionable positions on contentious political issues — I’m pro-Trump, pro-Second Amendment, sceptical of climate change — but none of them has cost me friendships in the way that Brexit has. Let me give you one example. There’s the couple we used to have supper with three or four times a year. (By our antisocial standards that puts them into the friendship premier league.) Our ideologies don’t align — she, especially, is more metropolitan fashionista — but still we have lots in common: geography, education, artistic sensibilities, mutual friends. We’ve got on by sticking to these subjects, while, in the Victorian way, steering clear of religion and politics.
    Then, after Brexit, the Fawn rang to fix up another evening. She got the husband, who sounded somewhat cagey. When she started proposing dinner dates, he grew cagier still — as though he were being briefed, perhaps through the medium of cut-throat hand signals. The upshot, anyway, was that none of the proposed dates was possible.

    At first we weren’t much worried —assuming we’d just caught them at a bad moment. Then, when radio silence persisted, we moved on to self-recrimination: wondering which of the many offensive things I’ve said tipped them over the edge. After that came hurt: how could our nice friends decide not to like us when we’re such lovely company? Now we’ve settled on wry amusement: how pathologically warped do you have to be to ditch your mates for no better reason than that they voted with the majority in a national referendum?
    Let me repeat that ‘voted with the majority’ because it’s easy to forget. Voting to leave the EU wasn’t some sick minority position, adopted by a handful of racists, wife-beaters and kitten-stranglers. It was, in fact, something the majority of voters — 17.4 million of us — supported; and which, surveys tell us, many more people who voted differently or who chose not to vote also support.
    How then do we explain this climate of extreme intolerance by an embittered but very vocal minority towards the shy minority? I think it’s down to a number of factors. Here are a few of them:
    1. Virtue-signalling. This is especially true of the Conservatives who voted Remain. Insecure Tories (i.e. not Jacob Rees-Mogg) are forever on the look-out for issues which demonstrate that far from being selfish reactionary Little Englanders they are at least as modern, open-minded, caring and non-racist as any socialist. Campaigning to stay in the EU, they have persuaded themselves, enables them to tick all the boxes and feel morally superior to those grisly Untermenschenwho just don’t care enough about vital, world-changing issue such as the Erasmus student-exchange programme.
    2. Visceral snobbery. Obviously one doesn’t want to be too rude about the disgusting, drooling, knuckle-dragging Neanderthals from places like Sunderland who voted in their hordes for Brexit. Suffice to say that barely one of them read PPE at Oxford; nor is one likely to break bread with them at the Fourth of June, or bump into any of them in the interval at the latest David Hare premiere.
    3. The media bubble. Hardly anyone in TV or newspapers believes in Brexit — and that applies not just to the Guardian and the BBC, but even to many of the right-wing papers that paid lip service to it. As a consequence of this bias, ardent Brexiteers are made to look like crazed outliers rather than the embodiment of the popular will.
    4. Thwarted entitlement. The liberal elite who uniformly backed Remain — lawyers, bankers, corporatists, quangocrats, top civil servants, etc — have spent their whole lives ruling the roost and getting their own way. This was their first taste of being rebuffed, all the more painful for being so unexpected. They will never forget this outrage — still less forgive it.
    https://www.spectator.co.uk/2018/02/...ng-pro-brexit/
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    (Original post by Napp)
    I've always found Delingpole to be an insufferable old boor and this piece really does drive home my conviction for that.
    The man is utterly a waste of Oxygen [or bytes in this case] how he cant understand why people would find him a complete **** for his steadfast conviction in rogering the UK is somewhat beyond me. Although I imagine in this case the fact he is a far right, pro trump hooligan might have also contributed to people removing themselves from his presence.


    https://www.spectator.co.uk/2018/02/...ng-pro-brexit/
    I posted in your other thread, but somehow the answer seems more apt to this one.
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    It makes sense because, in the UK, people won't really care if you support Trump as much if you support Brexit since Brexit directly affects us and our future prosperity. Trump is just someone who's going to be President of the US for 4 or 8 years. Brexit will fundamentally change our lives forever so obviously many people are going to be upset over their friend voting for Brexit if they feel that Brexit is going to have a negative effect on them and lower their quality of life.
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    If someone is no longer your friend because of a political decision (the right one), then they were never really your friend and not worth your time.
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    He is the man also Brexit is beneficial to this country.
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    Largely not that fussed about Brexit in principle, but I'm amused by Delingpole pretending he ever had any friends.
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    (Original post by Napp)
    I've always found Delingpole to be an insufferable old boor and this piece really does drive home my conviction for that.
    The man is utterly a waste of Oxygen [or bytes in this case] how he cant understand why people would find him a complete **** for his steadfast conviction in rogering the UK is somewhat beyond me. Although I imagine in this case the fact he is a far right, pro trump hooligan might have also contributed to people removing themselves from his presence.


    https://www.spectator.co.uk/2018/02/...ng-pro-brexit/
    Delingpole is one of those people who despite being highly educated and apparently very clever, is given to constantly pontificating outside his own field (he's a literary type trying to sound as if he understands science and economics) and so comes across as provably ridiculous. He has also mastered the art of sounding provocative in just the right ways, so the media love him and the BBC and other outlets treat him as if he's some kind of climate change guru (for example) when he knows less about science than the average medieval priest.

    Being pro-Brexit and pro-Trump are basically the same thing, which is why Farage loves Trump and Trump loves Farage - you have to ignore all facts and place your trust in a completely unreasoned pile of poo. Viola! You are thus reborn as a Trumpista and science-denier. Over to Delingpole for a few choice phrases.
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    (Original post by karl pilkington)
    He is the man also Brexit is beneficial to this country.
    How will it be beneficial to this country?
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    ch this
    (Original post by Trapz99)
    How will it be beneficial to this country?
    Are there actually any young people of my age who understand the importance of democracy, the ability to set the laws of our own country? Honestly, watch the whole of this (13 or so mins) and tell me https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vUKjTPPcOdQ
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    (Original post by anarchism101)
    Largely not that fussed about Brexit in principle, but I'm amused by Delingpole pretending he ever had any friends.
    Ever since the 2017 election I've started warming towards brexit with it is drving a wedge in the Tories and the class they represent XD

    May Brexit forever haunt the Conservatives.
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    (Original post by splitter2017)
    ch this

    Are there actually any young people of my age who understand the importance of democracy, the ability to set the laws of our own country? Honestly, watch the whole of this (13 or so mins) and tell me https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vUKjTPPcOdQ
    We are already a democratic country. We vote for MPs and MEPs for the European parliament. As an EU member we get a say in the laws that the EU implements.

    Leaving the EU will be highly likely to have a negative effect on the UK economy. Multiple studies have been done to predict this. Companies are already considering moving some of their staff out of the UK. Business confidence is down. GDP growth is lagging behind the US and the Eurozone. And we haven't even left yet. Leaving the single market will lead to less trade with the EU which is unlikely to be replaced by trade with the US and Asia.

    It is not worth sacrificing our country's economy and thousands of jobs in order to leave us more disconnected from Europe and "take back control" as the Brexiteers would say.
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    Regardless of your position on Brexit (or indeed Delingpole) I think it is worrying how closed people are becoming to political opinions that don't match their own.
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    I am pro-Brexit and pro-Trump, so /shrug.

    Douse me in your rather futile and meaningless indignation.

    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    Ever since the 2017 election I've started warming towards brexit with it is drving a wedge in the Tories and the class they represent XD

    May Brexit forever haunt the Conservatives.
    It's not limited to the Tories.
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    (Original post by TCA2b)



    It's not limited to the Tories.
    It is harming them much much more than Labour.

    Large swaves of the capitalist class are warming to the idea of a Labour government due thier less kamikazi approach to Brexit.
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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    It is harming them much much more than Labour.

    Large swaves of the capitalist class are warmuing to the idea of a Labour government due thier less kamikazi approach to Brexit.
    It's no harm for New Labour, sure, but isn't that just the force Corbyn has been labouring (hur dur) to eradicate?

    I'd hardly call the current govt's approach "kamikazi". It's been capitulation after capitulation, with some "tough" rhetoric on the fringes, but little other than May grovelling at the EU's feet, with talks of transition periods running beyond the two years after formal Brexit. The Labour approach is just slightly more EU-lite than the May Tory version of EU-lite. Where the rift will form is between those in both Labour and the Tories who are for a proper Brexit, and the tepid crap being put forward by May. This is admittedly a bigger problem for the Tory leadership, but it is high time that the party were shocked out of its state of lethargy.

    I don't put much stock in what bodies like the CBI say, tbh. Their track record on e.g. the Euro was hardly an indication of wisdom. What business needs is a clear sign of what to expect and admittedly, unless you're willing to capitulate on everything the EU wants, that is difficult to spell out in advance.
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    Probably because Brexit is more of an issue for British people than Trump.
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    (Original post by CurlyBen)
    Regardless of your position on Brexit (or indeed Delingpole) I think it is worrying how closed people are becoming to political opinions that don't match their own.
    Might one ask why people should blindly accept said opinions? Is it not the point of democracy to challenge opinions we disagree with? Especially when they negatively effect you?
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    Even I, a right-wing Brexity Speccie-reader, find Delingpole to be increasingly insane. He can be funny, and some of his columns can be quite good, but some are just bat****.

    This said, putting up with him for years and then ditching him just because your side lost a referendums seems pretty low.

    Unless these "acquaintances" are the Camerons or someone intimately involved in the vote, in which case I can sort of get it.
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    (Original post by Rinsed)
    Even I, a right-wing Brexity Speccie-reader, find Dellingpole to be increasingly insane. He can be funny, and some of his columns can be quite good, but some are just bat****

    This said, putting up with him for years and then ditching him just because your side lost a referendums seems pretty low.
    I do, unfortunately, tend to agree with this.
    With that being said the spiteful part of me would find it much more funny if he was out on his ear
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    (Original post by Napp)
    I do, unfortunately, tend to agree with this.
    With that being said the spiteful part of me would find it much more funny if he was out on his ear
    If the Spectator puts up with Rod Liddle, Delingpole is in no danger.
 
 
 
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