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    Does anyone know how difficult it would be to change degree courses at university? (I haven't started yet).

    I would be starting Leeds University to study International Business, and would want to change to International Business and Finance. The only downside being that the degree listed second requires grade A at GCSE maths and I have a B, though I am able to demonstrate an active interest in finance as I have already acquired lots of valuable work experience in this sector. Otherwise, the A level requirements for both degrees are the same.

    Do universities care about the GCSE requirements when you are there? Thanks!
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    Actually, It is challenging process. I advise you to change your course as soon as possible. However, as a freshman you can apply for another course but you may start your new course form the second year. The best way to get exact information is to write email to the staff of Leeds Uni.
    Good luck!
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    You shouldn't apply to one course with the intention of changing to another - besides the point that it's quite disingenuous, they have no obligation to permit the course change and you may well end up "stuck" on a course you didn't want to do. The GCSE requirement is probably due to the numerate element of the degree (the finance part) which it's quite likely will include covering maths comparable to A-level Maths, and want to see demonstration of this.

    It's possible they might consider a GCSE grade B maths if you apply through clearing and they're desperate to fill the space. However I'm dubious as to whether they would make an offer if you applied initially. Equally they can well use that as reason to deny any request to change course, as at that point they will have "filled" the course in all likelihood and taking an extra student on those modules that differ would be at the discretion of the department.

    Ultimately, if you would be happy with the first course if a change of course were denied, then you have little to lose by asking. If you hold an offer for that first course now (or receive one later in the year) it may be worth asking them if they would consider you for the other one - explaining that after applying you spent some more time researching and thought the latter course may be more appropriate to your interests etc, etc, but that you "only" have GCSE Maths grade B etc, etc, and they may do so. If you are absolutely set on that course, and would not want to pursue the first course, I would suggest you consider taking a gap year and doing A-level Maths - I imagine an A in that would satisfy their criteria that you have an appropriate numerate background for the course.
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    You shouldn't apply to one course with the intention of changing to another - besides the point that it's quite disingenuous, they have no obligation to permit the course change and you may well end up "stuck" on a course you didn't want to do. The GCSE requirement is probably due to the numerate element of the degree (the finance part) which it's quite likely will include covering maths comparable to A-level Maths, and want to see demonstration of this.

    It's possible they might consider a GCSE grade B maths if you apply through clearing and they're desperate to fill the space. However I'm dubious as to whether they would make an offer if you applied initially. Equally they can well use that as reason to deny any request to change course, as at that point they will have "filled" the course in all likelihood and taking an extra student on those modules that differ would be at the discretion of the department.

    Ultimately, if you would be happy with the first course if a change of course were denied, then you have little to lose by asking. If you hold an offer for that first course now (or receive one later in the year) it may be worth asking them if they would consider you for the other one - explaining that after applying you spent some more time researching and thought the latter course may be more appropriate to your interests etc, etc, but that you "only" have GCSE Maths grade B etc, etc, and they may do so. If you are absolutely set on that course, and would not want to pursue the first course, I would suggest you consider taking a gap year and doing A-level Maths - I imagine an A in that would satisfy their criteria that you have an appropriate numerate background for the course.
    I didn't apply to one course with the intention of changing to another, nor am I or have I been disingenuous. I am asking what the likelihood of change is as I have done further research as you say. Taking a year out and sitting an entirely new subject is not an option and it's unrealistic, unfortunately.

    The reason why I ask is because it isn't about changing to an entirely new course, only from a single to joint honours. Surely a maths exam that I sat when I was 15 will bear little relevance to how I could perform when I start university at the age of 20? So overall what you are saying is that it is unlikely I will be able to switch?
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    (Original post by LMsav)
    I didn't apply to one course with the intention of changing to another, nor am I or have I been disingenuous. I am asking what the likelihood of change is as I have done further research as you say. Taking a year out and sitting an entirely new subject is not an option and it's unrealistic, unfortunately.

    The reason why I ask is because it isn't about changing to an entirely new course, only from a single to joint honours. Surely a maths exam that I sat when I was 15 will bear little relevance to how I could perform when I start university at the age of 20? So overall what you are saying is that it is unlikely I will be able to switch?
    It's relevant because the course is necessarily numerate, and they will presumably be planning to build on that background in the course of the degree to faciitate the quantitative analysis of financial issues. If you have a poor background in the area, it's going to be difficult to them to teach you this, and more likely you'll struggle on the course - so they have no particular incentive to take you.

    However while the difference between a B and an A isn't that significant for someone fresh from the course or who has continued to another quantitative subject where they've continually used that background, it may be cause for concern that someone removed from this study will struggle to refresh their background while building upon it. Someone who got an A then did no further study in quantitative areas may at least be more viewed as more likely to cope with the workload of catching up after two years away from their perspective, hence the requirement.

    For quantitative and STEM subjects, knowledge is necessarily based on the prior background - with a poor foundation, it's hard to develop the more advanced knowledge (I'm talking from experience here). For other subjects general transferable skills will usually suffice to pick up things, but as above, these areas necessarily assume and build on prior knowledge.

    I'm saying is that whether you are permitted to do so is entirely at the discretion of the university, and so you are at the mercy of their decision-making.
 
 
 
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