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    (Original post by madmadmax321)
    Its much much more important to consider the uni rather than the subject when looking at a career in IB. Its much more beneficial to make the op aware that for IB, going to a target uni is very important (and will make your life a lot easier when trying to break into the sector) rather than just stating that economics is the highest paid subject (which is a very misleading statement in itself)

    No offence but I dont think I have seen you give any good advice in the career section on tsr and a good amount of the time, the stuff you say is just completely incorrect
    Yea but nothing i said was really incorrect economics graduates are amongst the highest earners..

    How is suggest economics n/a when all someone wants to do is make money? wouldnt the study of money come into play.

    so you just sound like an arse tbf.
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    (Original post by gigi77774)
    Forex
    While there's potentially a lot of money in the various types of "trading", it's a more money in = more money out, type deal, which is worth keeping in mind. You could build up a lot of funds through successful trading over the years, of course, but some people think you're gonna become rich overnight, and you're certainly not.
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    (Original post by Realitysreflexx)
    Yea but nothing i said was really incorrect economics graduates are amongst the highest earners..

    How is suggest economics n/a when all someone wants to do is make money? wouldnt the study of money come into play.

    so you just sound like an arse tbf.
    Because the majority of the highest paying careers dont require a specific subject so blindly suggesting economics is foolish as it is a academic subject so people go into a wide variety of careers with it (that are also accessible with other subjects without being disadvantaged). Making someone who does not know this is very useful information

    Also the average salary a subject gets for its grads is meaningless due to the above statement (when looking at academic degrees)
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    (Original post by Keslo)
    Im currently doing GCSES and am almost certain I will get all A/A* and in College I chose Further Maths, A level maths and Economics however I am willing to change economics and I may be forced to do a 4th option as im doing further maths. As the thread title suggests I just want to know the career that pays the most, i have heard investment banking pays a ton but so does jobs like medicine. If you were to go for money what career would you pursue and what A level options do you need for the career?
    Oh boy haha, 10 years from now you will really regret your career choice! :lol: You will look back on this thread and think you were a complete fool (and think that snowman guy was completely right!) :lol:

    To answer your question: investment banking, accountancy, actuary, stockbroker. Most financial jobs basically.
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    (Original post by tedgfbtebfetedfb)
    Don't listen to the others about having to go to oxbridge. You will need to go to a target uni (Oxbridge, LSE, UCL, Imperial or warwick). You will be fine with any of these though your best bet would be to go to oxbridge or LSE with more weight towards Cambridge and LSE. Also don't listen to those on this thread who are telling you to study anything. They are wrong. Over 86% of investment banker graduate of 2015 to a mathematical degree (Mathematics, Economics, Natural sciences etc) with more weight towards maths and econ. I have worked in HR for a few days during my work experience program at an investment bank and I got to have a look at some of their statistics. I can promise you no one had a media degree. It is rare to see someone outside the fields I have mentioned above. You're best bet is to do maths, further maths, economics and any subject for your fourth (Although dont do a really soft subject as this can really damage your chances of going to a top uni.). You would be better off going LSE over cambridge as cam tend to give offers of 3 A* and this is usually very hard to meet. Also LSE is in central London so it will be much easier in terms of recruitment and links.
    Do you have any links to the evidence of the bit in bold?
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    tbh i would say work for pleasure and not money. if they're the same thing to you, then figure out what you actually enjoy about your career path and go from there.
    personally, i find trading with the knowledge is good for money and really isn't all that time-consuming.
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    Can't advise you on what career to pursue for lots of money, but I can tell you that medicine is one that you SHOULDN'T pursue.

    Even if you can get fantastic grades (not doubting that), your motivation of making money alone isn't something a doctor should be aligned towards. Not denying that some may think of that as the years go by but if you initial thought for pursuing medicine is for the money then don't even try. You are potentially handling with people's lives in future should you become a dr - if your desire for money clouds your thinking and judgement, then a pt's care may be compromised.

    Additionally, whilst a career in medicine probably pays well, it takes very long to reap returns. You might as well pursue other careers to allow faster accummulation of money, rather than go through long training and realise that you are not as rich as you'd like to be.
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    (Original post by D3LLI5)
    IB looks good on paper but good luck staying on for more than 3 years when you work 90 hour weeks, and enjoy losing years off your life. Taking into account tax your net earnings per hour are basically equal to working at McDonald’s.
    While your statement about comparable hourly rate is somewhat true for first year (or 2) of IB after this is does not hold as the salary increases very fast, which is the attraction for a lot of people to IB as no other career (other than some law firms perhaps) offers that kind of earning potential at that fast a rate. And for some people this is enough the stay motivated and a lot of people are willing to give up their 20s to their career to be somewhat set for the rest of their life finance wise
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    Lots of financial jobs have high earning potential. If you want to just earn loads of money, studying medicine isn't the one. You need to have the ability and the WANT to do medicine, it's not something you should lightly compare to investment banking. Take into account jobs in finance are mentally draining and your work-life balance will probably be horrendous as an investment banker. Don't assume that because you're doing v well at GCSE that it's going to be the same at A level, your grades now have nothing to do with how well you will do at A level (you'll realise this within the first few months of AS, it won't be what you expected, nor will your grades). Do subjects that you want or need to take and work a job because you enjoy doing it, put 100% in, and the money comes with it. Good luck.
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    (Original post by madmadmax321)
    Do you have any links to the evidence of the bit in bold?
    I cant find the official link for the stastistic that I mentioned but here's a website that showed the most popular degrees/majors (its an american website)are mathematical

    https://news.efinancialcareers.com/u...s-wall-street/
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    Wants to earn loads of money but asks on a student forum rather than simply Googling. Yeah good luck, you're gonna have to work harder than that if you want to earn lots of money.
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    (Original post by Keslo)
    Im currently doing GCSES and am almost certain I will get all A/A* and in College I chose Further Maths, A level maths and Economics however I am willing to change economics and I may be forced to do a 4th option as im doing further maths. As the thread title suggests I just want to know the career that pays the most, i have heard investment banking pays a ton but so does jobs like medicine. If you were to go for money what career would you pursue and what A level options do you need for the career?
    As someone who is quite privvy to high paying careers, I think this list covers most of them.

    Grad careers

    1. High finance (IBD/S&T/PE/HF/VC/AM/Research)

    2. Corporate law (Partner track or be a high flying barrister)

    3. Medicine (GPs (family doctors) and specialists: anaesthesists, surgeons, OB/GYN etc)

    4. Accounting (Audit/Tax) at a big4/top 10 firm (Partner track)

    5. Executive management track (Director>VP>SVP>C-suite) of a business function (HR/R&D/Operations/Finance/Merchandising/Marketing/Sales etc..) at any large to mid-size company or organisation

    6. Product person (software engineer, product manager, designer, data scientists etc..) at a big brand name tech company (FB/Google etc)

    7. Consulting at a strat house (MBB/Oliver Wyamn/Strategy& etc) or other major firm (partner track)

    8. Any type of high end sales (e.g. enterprise, luxury, headhunting, broking etc)

    9. Real Estate (RE IB/REITs/RE PE/Development)

    10. Dentistry (especially Orthodontics/Maxilofacial Surgery)

    11. Quant finance (trading, quant research, strats, etc) at a hedge fund or prop/HFT trading firm or IB

    12. Actuary (partner track or exec track depending)

    13. Middle Office (Risk, Compliance etc) at an IB

    14. Corporate Banking, Commercial Banking or Private Banking at a top firm

    15. Pilot for a major airline

    16. Oil and Gas/Mining (Geologist/Petroleum Engineer etc..)

    18. High ranking professor at a major university


    Talent and heavily luck-based careers

    1. Entrepreneurship (any kind: contracting, consulting, brick and mortar, online, startup etc)

    2. High profile creative person (Film/TV/Theatre/Music/Modelling/Architecture/Design)

    3. High end sportsperson

    4. Internet personality (Blogger/Youtuber etc)

    5. High end nutritionists, personal fitness coaches, life coaches

    6. High end psychologists and therapists

    7. High end chefs and cooks

    8. Bartenders at high end venues

    9. Pro gamblers and poker players

    10. Pro gamers

    General theme is:

    Either be really good at what you do (talent/luck and sales)

    or

    Get any academic degree from a good uni, beat out the competition with continual CV development/interview prep/networking to get on to a high paying general grad job (finance, consulting, law, accounting, rotational grad scheme) then stick it out and continue to beat out the competition

    or

    Get an in demand, healthcare degree (medicine/dentistry)

    or

    Get a quant degree, beat out the competition to get a high paying quantitative/technical role, stick it out and continue to outperform

    or

    Get an in demand specialist degree, beat out the competition to get a relevant grad role at a good company (engineering, geology etc)

    Bear in mind, most of these tracks will probably mean sacrificing much of your social life and free time in exchange for your career - very rarely do any of the above routes lead to 40hr weeks, more like 55-80+hr weeks.

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    (Original post by ecolier)
    Well it's not medicine.



    It's not medicine. As above it's elite sports / business (top of the food chain) if you want lots and lots of money.
    Medicine definitely counts.. ~£76k basic for a consultant is still far more than most people will ever earn not to mention the ones who supplement that with private work, are partners in GP practices or move abroad that get low-mid six figure compensation or more.

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    (Original post by Realitysreflexx)
    so he said what type of degree....i said economics for good reason... so according to you he should take social work and then go into IB?

    he needs quantative skills....

    you telling him to ignore a subject that combines math with money and critical thinking plus world awareness is rather idiotic.
    You know 90% of banking is pretty much just GCSE level maths right?

    Ideally, it would be any academic subject (be that history, econ, english, psychology whatever) but so long as that social work degree is from a good university (unlikely, since most good unis don't do social work degrees) they are in contention.

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    Online product launch, affiliate marketing, mailing lists...online seems to be where the money is now, my friend.

    Also, as great A LOT of money sounds, would you rather be rich and miserable or comfortable and doing something that sets your heart on fire with passion?

    Food for thought.

    You got this.
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    (Original post by Keslo)
    Im currently doing GCSES and am almost certain I will get all A/A* and in College I chose Further Maths, A level maths and Economics however I am willing to change economics and I may be forced to do a 4th option as im doing further maths. As the thread title suggests I just want to know the career that pays the most, i have heard investment banking pays a ton but so does jobs like medicine. If you were to go for money what career would you pursue and what A level options do you need for the career?
    I would also dispute medicine. If you break it down by how many hours doctors work vs their pay, especially junior doctors, they are not relatively well paid. My physios husband recently qualified as a doctor and works as a junior doc in A&E. He's only on about 30k to start with. After working as a programmer a 18 months after leaving uni I was on more than that. I worked a 40 hour week Monday-Friday, and got every weekend off. The guy who qualified as a junior doc had to work very anti-social shifts and ended up doing more than 40 hours a week regularly.

    Do medicine because you are passionate about it, not because of the money.

    As an aside, Software Engineers, if you are exceptionally good, can be incredibly well paid. It's not unheard of that top SEs in the likes of Google and Apple to bring in 7 figures a year (when you include bonus payments and share dividends). You need to be in the top 1% of programmers to get in to those places though.
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    Any job you're really good at will pay well.

    And that's by far the most important thing; actually being good at it.

    Yes, all the careers listed above will pay well. But only if you can actually do them.

    It takes graft and motivation. Merely getting X degree is not enough. High paid jobs are not just handed out. They involve hard work and luck. If you're looking for an easy fix, as your post kinda suggests, you won't succeed in any of them.
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    (Original post by It's****ingWOODY)
    While there's potentially a lot of money in the various types of "trading", it's a more money in = more money out, type deal, which is worth keeping in mind. You could build up a lot of funds through successful trading over the years, of course, but some people think you're gonna become rich overnight, and you're certainly not.
    Yes it is like that, although if OP has learnt about analysing trends and such, then you dont need to put a lot of money in. You can start with something like 20 and then invest in it and when the graph begins to decrease then take it out, making about double in the first week or 2 if done right.
    But yes haha it doesn't work by getting rich overnight
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    (Original post by gigi77774)
    Yes it is like that, although if OP has learnt about analysing trends and such, then you dont need to put a lot of money in. You can start with something like 20 and then invest in it and when the graph begins to decrease then take it out, making about double in the first week or 2 if done right.
    But yes haha it doesn't work by getting rich overnight
    Doubling your money in a week or two is extremely rare and you'd be ****ing lucky. A lot of people put in upwards of 5k for starters, if it worked like you said they'd be millionaires within a few months.
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    (Original post by It's****ingWOODY)
    Doubling your money in a week or two is extremely rare and you'd be ****ing lucky. A lot of people put in upwards of 5k for starters, if it worked like you said they'd be millionaires within a few months.
    Hey when I did it I focused all my time on it for a week lol
 
 
 
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