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How much does owning a car actually cost? watch

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    My parents keep telling me not to get driving lessons because even if I pass, I won’t be able to afford a car. I make about £35 a week from a weekend job which isn’t loads but I’m considering asking for more hours. Would that even be able to cover the costs of owning a car?
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    Too much.

    But the cost of insurance will fall a lot over a few years if you don't have any accidents et cetra...

    You'll probably regret getting lessons in the future so if you want, use part of your 35 quid for lessons which are about £20-£25 in my area/hour.

    How much more will you be earning? £35 is no where near enough. I earn about £60 a week and could never afford a car
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    Moved to cars and motoring
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    £35 a week when you're a new young driver might just about cover the insurance :rofl: You need to be making a full time wage to even start to consider owning a car tbh.
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    Depends, but you’d need at least a full time job or a very well paying part time job if you want to set aside at least 15/20% of your monthly income to your car.
    For now, focus on getting the lessons and your license because The more you’ve held a licence the cheaper insurance gets every year.
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    (Original post by Lucaas)
    My parents keep telling me not to get driving lessons because even if I pass, I won’t be able to afford a car. I make about £35 a week from a weekend job which isn’t loads but I’m considering asking for more hours. Would that even be able to cover the costs of owning a car?
    Like others have said, use your money for lessons so you can get your licence ASAP. I passed last August but I've not driven since but I have no regrets.
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    I was reading somewhere it costs around £3500 a year to run a used car
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    (Original post by Lucaas)
    My parents keep telling me not to get driving lessons because even if I pass, I won’t be able to afford a car. I make about £35 a week from a weekend job which isn’t loads but I’m considering asking for more hours. Would that even be able to cover the costs of owning a car?
    So.. £1,820 a year - you've got to factor in the cost of the car, insurance, tax, MOT, servicing, repairs, fuel, etc.

    My first year of insurance was £2,200 - most new drivers have similar premiums, but I'll be conservative and say £1,500.
    Tax we'll go for £115 per year (assuming used petrol car).
    I do in excess of 30,000 miles a year, so I have 3 services every year - let's assume you'll only be needing the one, plus an MOT - at a bargain basement garage that'll set you back say.. £150.
    Repairs and consumables, let's budget £25 per month.
    A tank of fuel every couple of weeks, let's say £80 per month.

    So.. so far we've got just over £3,000 per year there.. without factoring in the purchase cost, which works out at just short of £60 per week AT MINIMUM.

    Do you think you'll be able to afford it? I don't.
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    (Original post by Lucaas)
    My parents keep telling me not to get driving lessons because even if I pass, I won’t be able to afford a car. I make about £35 a week from a weekend job which isn’t loads but I’m considering asking for more hours. Would that even be able to cover the costs of owning a car?
    Memorise this sentence and tell it to your parents:

    "I know that I don't have the income to support owning a car right now, but if I pass my test this year, and go to buy a car two or three years from now when I have a higher stable income, that will be two or three years of having held a full driving licence when it comes to applying for insurance, so I think it really would be cost-effective in the long term to plan for my future, have driving lessons and take my test now, rather than wait until I'm ready to buy my own car and face the extortionate insurance prices that target recently-qualified young drivers."
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    £35 a week might be enough to cover the fuel (depending on how much driving you do), or the insurance (if you're lucky), but there's absolutely no way in hell you're even close to being able to cover all the expenses of owning a car.

    I assumed you weren't including actually getting the car within the £35 pw budget too, or I'd call you crazy for even creating this thread :lol:
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    Short answer, no. Your budget doesn't even cover my insurance let alone everything else lol.

    (Original post by XMaramena)
    Memorise this sentence and tell it to your parents:

    "I know that I don't have the income to support owning a car right now, but if I pass my test this year, and go to buy a car two or three years from now when I have a higher stable income, that will be two or three years of having held a full driving licence when it comes to applying for insurance, so I think it really would be cost-effective in the long term to plan for my future, have driving lessons and take my test now, rather than wait until I'm ready to buy my own car and face the extortionate insurance prices that target recently-qualified young drivers."
    It's not that great because you don't have ncb/driving experience behind it and it's worthless for someone to have a new driver as named as it bumps up their premium. The rate would likely be calculated at close to what a new driver is anyway.

    With that said it's still worth getting a license out the way, especially with the way regulations and whatnot keep changing. Last thing you want is for us one day to have Australia's dumb system and happen to only start driving then.
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    (Original post by Lucaas)
    My parents keep telling me not to get driving lessons because even if I pass, I won’t be able to afford a car. I make about £35 a week from a weekend job which isn’t loads but I’m considering asking for more hours. Would that even be able to cover the costs of owning a car?
    Personally I would advise getting the license:
    -getting a driving license years before you even buy a car is very useful. It's an easier form of ID to carry around, it's nice to have the option later in life to get a car whenever without then spending a year learning to drive, and disposable income could be greater now than it will be later when you have bills to pay and mortgages etc to save up for.
    -insurance is cheaper several years after passing even if you haven't driven in that time
    -once you have the license you can then decide if you get a car or not. Yes it is expensive: mine is a 13 year old honda jazz. It's not nice to look at by any means, but very reliable and practical, it's a 5 door car with an actual boot and plenty of space, but at 1.4l isn't too expensive to insure, although 1l cars are much much cheaper!

    Costs:
    -I typically spend £900 insurance per year (2nd year driving with one crash last year which wrote off my last car and I'm 24, so your insurance will vary!)
    -My road tax is £130 per year
    -I drive all over, so get through about 2-4 tanks of petrol each month at £35-40 each time, which is usually around 300 miles each tank= approx £120 each month. The average teenager/student/young adult won't drive this many miles unless like me you visit family 40 miles away each weekend and drive to stables in the week which are miles out into the countryside...
    -MOT and services: it's a 13 year old car but very reliable. I budgeted £500 this year and so far have used most of this on its annual service and mot and it is needed new brake pads. I'll also need 2 new tires this summer, and wiper blades. Last summer I had to have part of a new exhaust pipe after it just fell off on the motorway! Basically you need to have some spare cash for unexpected stuff, but also save up for the yearly stuff and wear and tear.
    Approx yearly cost for me: £3k, give or take several hundred.
    The car itself is worth maybe £600-800

    I doubt you will be able to afford a car unless you increase your hours dramatically, and then (presumably you're a student?) you're at risk of struggling with academic work. But definitely get a license! It's a very good investment for the future. And you never know you might get a job/ uni placement/ work experience etc that needs someone who can drive...
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    I’ve only recently bought my first car and have a full time job.

    People who got a car whilst at college, I’ve no idea how they afforded it (university students will probably use student loan for the most of it).
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    Please don’t tell me you were going to buy the car with £35 a week as well. I’m 24 and have my first full time proper job. I passed my driving test in August and here is the break down of what I spend on my car:
    £3750 to buy the thing- loaned money off my dad as he retired and got a pay out. I pay him £200 a month for this.
    - Insurance: started at £220 a month and has now gone down to £160 as I have a black box and I’ve scored well
    - fuel: I fill up 4 times a month at £30 a time
    - repairs: so far I’ve had a new tyre for £50, my brake pads fixed (my dad did it) I need a new wish bone or whatever it is at some point and that’s about £150 and 2 new lightbulbs at £10 each

    That’s all for a 2009 fiat 500. Don’t get me wrong, I love my car and being able to drive is great but on £35 a week, even if you get more hours I’m sorry but it’s not enough
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    (Original post by XMaramena)
    Memorise this sentence and tell it to your parents:

    "I know that I don't have the income to support owning a car right now, but if I pass my test this year, and go to buy a car two or three years from now when I have a higher stable income, that will be two or three years of having held a full driving licence when it comes to applying for insurance, so I think it really would be cost-effective in the long term to plan for my future, have driving lessons and take my test now, rather than wait until I'm ready to buy my own car and face the extortionate insurance prices that target recently-qualified young drivers."
    I couldnt have said it better myself actually.
    You wont regret getting your driving licence.
 
 
 
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