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    Just read this iarticle on the BBC. I found this statement from the Sutton trust really interesting:

    Sir Peter Lampl, chairman of the Sutton Trust, said: "In the modern economy it is often those who are most mobile who are most likely to find success. "Moving away to university can be an important first step. Moving to London, or other large cities in the UK, can be an 'escalator' for social mobility."
    If you don't move away to a big city for university are you losing out on a boost social mobility? :holmes: This confused me a bit as the example student in the article went to Birmingham which I believe is a major city (:ninja:), but it's an interesting question and I'd be interested to know what people think. How important is moving away for uni really?
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    For me personally, I would agree with the statement. Moving to a university gives full immersion to the student experience and provides a depth of integration that I feel like staying at home negates. I know individuals who have not moved up and tend to be slightly more reserved and dissociated from the university life. That being said I’m not applying this blanket statement to all, I realise there are exceptions to this. Just drawing on my own personal experience I have found it to be an integrative process which has been vital for engagement with the whole environment. I’m sure those who do not move out to university probably feel that they aren’t missing out, however if they aren’t aware of all the possible opportunities or receiving a helping hand to try out new things then perhaps they themselves aren’t ever aware of their missed opportunities?
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    Someone on my course dropped out cos he couldn't deal with such a long commute from home to uni
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    (Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
    Just read this iarticle on the BBC. I found this statement from the Sutton trust really interesting:



    If you don't move away to a big city for university are you losing out on a boost social mobility? :holmes: This confused me a bit as the example student in the article went to Birmingham which I believe is a major city (:ninja:), but it's an interesting question and I'd be interested to know what people think. How important is moving away for uni really?
    If there aren't opportunities for social mobility in Birmingham, isn't that a flaw in us as a country, rather than in not moving out for uni? Given the price of accommodation in London, how many students can actually afford to move to London for uni, or stay there after graduation? I sort of think the article is missing the point in this respect.

    For the record, I commuted for year 2/3 of my degree (not in Birmingham) and I think I benefited long term from being able to save money while studying and not take on any commercial debt. I was able to buy a car whilst studying, and have money for a rental deposit when I moved for my first professional job. I have a comfortable "emergency fund" and can spend money on traveling if I want to. I didn't need to work in the final year of my degree, as I was financially comfortable.

    Long term, I think I benefited more from having savings to start my adult life with than moving away for uni. I don't think I missed out by staying at home. However, I am moving to a city (not London) for a PGCE later this year, so maybe I do subconsciously feel like I missed out.

    Obviously the plural of anecdote is not data, but I think the article is a bit flawed.
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    There's balances to both.

    Not moving out means you miss new friendships, networking opportunities, a reputation as a 'closed' person both to other people and employers and

    Moving out means you miss the most obvious opportunity which is saving. Not only are you throwing away at least 20000 in the bin for rent over 3 years, but at the end of it all you will have at least double the debt of your peers who stayed at home. Statistically people who stay at home are more likely to engage in part-time work too, so you're going to be most likely saving for your first deposit or 'luxuries' like a car (on credit 18 plate BMW or used).
    You are in a far superior position to people who moved out, whether or not you want to continue to live in the city you are in (in which case, buy a house) or move out (in which case, have enough cushion money to live in London or elsewhere without worrying about temporary unemployment)

    I have met people who stayed at home and saved and bought a house after graduation (and that's in the south), and others who saved enough to make a comfortable move to London. In one case, my cousin's friend wanted to move to London to look for work after graduation but couldn't because he already had an overdraft and he had no savings to afford a move to London. He had to turn down job offers from London because he had no money saved up to pay for rent before the first paycheque, and the job offers were too low to simultaneously live in a shared bedsit in Zone 4+ and commute to work every day.

    On the other hand, my cousin who stayed at home doesn't know anyone after graduation bar one or two people as his friendships were those who he was in Sixth Form with, and he thus has an empty network and no real 'student experience'. He also (probably) has less ambition than people who were thrown in the deep end.

    Long story short is that there are benefits to both.

    The only objective preference I can see is if you are a poor/middle class Londoner, you should stay at home if you're going to a London uni. It genuinely isn't worth the money to waste on moving out half way across the city.
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    You might be saving money by commuting, but in the long run you can end up missing out on opportunities.

    Opportunities to learn to:
    Become a responsible person
    Become independent
    Budget
    Cook
    Clean/tidy

    It can also affect social life. You will most likely not be constantly surrounded by other students therefore making it difficult to get to know people and make friends. Those who travel by train can constantly be worrying about what time train to get home so may not join societies and clubs.
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    I personally, as a commuter, truly believe that there is no loss of social mobility at all, at least in my experience. I have talked to many people in and out of my uni who actually find living on uni campus was more isolating for them, and did not make many friends, because they felt too overwhelmed, and also it was just their personality. In fact I think that's what it comes down to - yes you are going to loose social mobility if you stay at home BUT ONLY if you don't try and make friends and connections, same as with living on campus. I have made many friends that i will probably keep in touch with because i made that effort, and therefore commuting has not been detrimental to me at all, and have saved A TON of money in the process.
    So i think it really comes down to the individual rather than the living situation.
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    I think it depends entirely on the person. It's all well and good having perceived experts speak for the masses but at the end of the day it's just an opinion and his point is essentially moot anyway because it depends entirely on the person and what they are comfortable with, what they feel they can commit to and their dedication to their cause. I moved away to a big city and I still have to commute.

    Of course, perhaps you miss out on certain aspects of student life if you live at home... but I'm very sure the person making that decision is aware of that. What's more, imagine the money you'd save!
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    I agree. I commuted one year and lived in the city another year.
    When I commuted not only I didn't make ANY friends but I was constantly tired but my grades were higher (because on days off or when I came back early I didn't have anything else to do but study). When I moved to the city and my uni was about 10 minutes away I would go out every night or go to a house party, I made a lot of friends (though when I moved back home only one friendship survived :rolleyes:) but my grades dropped because I was spending more time with people than revising. And then I moved back home again simply to save up + get my grades up.

    But I think everyone should try living in the bigger city at least for a year or so, just to see how it is and make friends, to see if you're missing out or not.
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    For the record, I think it's perfectly possible to live at home and have a good social life and make lots of friends/contacts. It maybe takes a little more effort on your part to be social or join societies, but it really is possible. Plenty of people who move away also face social difficulties, and this can be much more isolating when you're hours away from home.

    At unis where more people are commuting, I imagine it's easier to make friends who are also commuting.

    In my opinion, it doesn't take three years of living away from home to learn to be independent, either.

    I wonder if in a lot of cases, the downsides of not commuting are caused by the same factors that caused the person to chose to commute in the first place- e.g. shyness could cause someone to chose to commute and be less likely to make friends. There could also be social factors involved- those from less typical backgrounds may feel excluded or intimidated at uni.
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    Hmm you can always do the halfway step and get a student house , plenty of Landlords let by the room or as a group . Houses can be less messy than halls and a bit quieter too.
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    As a person who’s commuting 35 mins to UCL daily, financially it’s been a good decision to stay at home for me. Socially however it’s been harder because you realise everyone knows everyone and because you are the one going home, leaving parties or events early to catch the train, you do feel a bit isolated.

    Have I lost out? 51% yes, 49% no
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    Hm.

    I moved out for the first three weeks of the first year... and moved back home, lol. I didn't mix with my flatmates (I don't drink or club, etc) so I don't think in that sense I did.

    I have saved up 21K and I am in my final year - I work too, btw. Every weekend. But I have missed A LOT of lectures when I don't want to commute (30 mins on the bus home, then 1 hour train ride and then 20 minute walk to Uni and this is one way).

    I don't have friends, go to parties, socialize and I have missed out on a few things but tbh, this doesn't bother me. Lol. It depends, if you are reserved like me, then sure, it's cool but if you LIKE being around people then commuting may be a struggle.
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    Hi Rosie,I was just wondering I am in my first year and did the exact same commute to and back from uni (2 hours there and 2 hours back)-I was just wondering did you continue to do that in your second and third year and which uni you went to? I'm thinking of moving out for second year but wasn't too sure.Thanks!
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    aAt first, when UI imagined lving on my own, I thought of the possibly girlfriend I would have come over. But I have come to to end of my second year and nothing has happerend.
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    I’m a bit older and I commute as I live in our own house with my partner. I live quite a distance (15 miles, 45 min bus ride) from the uni and it seems that unbelievably my uni seemed utterly confused by this set up as they only seem to recognise a)18 year olds living in halls and perhaps b) second and third year students living in privately rented houses in streets immediately surrounding the uni!!!
    I don’t feel I’ve lost out at all. I have a life outside of uni (thank god as my uni experience has been utterly depressing) or perhaps it’s just because I’m old and grumpy
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    To put it simply, it depends on what you're looking for.

    If you're looking for a degree then no, you're not missing out. But if you're looking for an "experience" then yes, you are. Even the most socially outgoing people at my uni struggled if they didn't live on campus. You just don't spend the same amount of time with people, commuting takes up time that could be spent socialising, and it's difficult to go out around your uni when you have nowhere to go (unless you have a VERY generous friend who doesn't mind you kipping on their floor every time you go out).

    But I do understand why so many people choose to live at home. It is certainly a lot cheaper, and to some extent it will probably help you to focus on studies as well, because living in halls can be very distracting. There's temptation everywhere!
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    It really depends where you live. I'd argue if you live at home and go to a London university you probably don't miss out on much. This is for a few reasons.
    1. Halls are distributed around the city anyway, they're not usually near i.e walking distance, to the university. Therefore, everybody effectively commutes.
    2. 2nd and 3rd year students usually live even further from university than halls and are distributed across the city, there's not really a 'student community' vibe to miss out on.
    3. Halls just isn't as big a thing in London as other universities, often because there is a high proportion of people living at home anyway. (this has overhwhelmingly been my experience at LSE - people make most their friends outside of halls so it doesn't really matter).

    Saying this, I wasn't a home student. I did live in halls, then I lived with friends and then my boyfriend. But if i'd had the choice to live at home, I would have in my 2nd year, alas my mother lives too far away.
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    I think other posters have addressed most of the pros/cons of commuting. To add another perspective, when I first read that quote I thought that perhaps he meant that if you commute, perhaps you get comfortable and lose social mobility because you don't have the confidence, knowledge, or inspiration to move elsewhere. I know that a lot of people that have graduated already that have gotten quite comfortable in the area and subsequently have not really moved very far from our University. Because it's near London, it's not a bad prospect, with so many jobs and industries near by. However, I can imagine that outside of a major city, or if you're not near your industry, you might be daunted by moving out to get closer to opportunity.
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    (Original post by RosieAppleLemon)
    Hm.

    I moved out for the first three weeks of the first year... and moved back home, lol. I didn't mix with my flatmates (I don't drink or club, etc) so I don't think in that sense I did.

    I have saved up 21K and I am in my final year - I work too, btw. Every weekend. But I have missed A LOT of lectures when I don't want to commute (30 mins on the bus home, then 1 hour train ride and then 20 minute walk to Uni and this is one way).

    I don't have friends, go to parties, socialize and I have missed out on a few things but tbh, this doesn't bother me. Lol. It depends, if you are reserved like me, then sure, it's cool but if you LIKE being around people then commuting may be a struggle.
    Woah 2 hour commute each way is mad! Yeah same social life is pretty non-existent but then again I look at the people who are in uni and wonder if I actually want to be friends with them haha. Dont drink/club either. Commuting is tiring for me (even though only an hour) but i guess i have saved a lot of money.
 
 
 
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