Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    I worry I already know the answer to this but I thought I'd post a thread anyway.

    I was idly browsing a second-hand bookshop and I found an old physics textbook for A level. I've been planning on learning some physics eventually and the book was less than the price of a cup of coffee so I thought there was no harm in getting it. I've definitely spent more frivolous £2 coins anyway.

    However, the book is really old (1984 edition). I reasoned that a lot of basic physics can't have changed that much in that time. But maybe it is too different to be of use now?

    There is a review on Amazon for this edition from 2010 saying that much of the content is unchanged and it is still a useful book.

    The topics in the book are:
    Materials
    Mechanics
    Fields
    Waves
    Atoms

    Where might a good place be for me to check/update my knowledge and cover any gaps? Or should I just keep the book as a curiosity and get something else? I am trying to learn on the cheap at the moment as I am not reaching my savings goals :awesome: so I'm hoping TSR will help me out.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    If you can post the name/author ISBN of the book I'll have a look.

    Courses do change - it's likely for example that a textbook from back then won't include the particle physics that appears at A-level now. But for basis, for the core topics, they don't change. You might eve find that the questions are a bit tougher in the old book and the text might feel a bit antiquated but it will still be useful as an extra.

    In your position, you could use the book as a core text, and use the internet for more up to date question styles and see how you get on. Then any topics missing you might be able to get enough info online or might be able to get another text book later on. (ebay is a good source of text books, anything other the current version of a textbook often turns up fairly cheaply)
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by phys981)
    If you can post the name/author ISBN of the book I'll have a look.

    Courses do change - it's likely for example that a textbook from back then won't include the particle physics that appears at A-level now. But for basis, for the core topics, they don't change. You might find that the questions are a bit tougher in the old book and the text might feel a bit antiquated but it will still be useful as an extra.
    Thank you! It's called Physics a Textbook for advanced level students by Tom Duncan. The ISBN is 0 7195 3889 0
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    Good solid textbook that one. I was given one of those for a school prize way back when.

    Textbooks have generally been made more 'accessible' since then - ie with more easily understood language - but for the main topics it's a good start. The modern ones are more reader friendly but the physics in it is excellent and some of the explanations are more detailed and go beyond those in some recent books. Definitely not a waste of £2.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by trou_noir)
    Thank you! It's called Physics a Textbook for advanced level students by Tom Duncan. The ISBN is 0 7195 3889 0
    Yeah it was way ahead of it's time when it came out - I'd snap it up but be aware that you'll have to proactively check your syllabus & fill in any gaps, physics A level hasn't changed much since '84 but it has changed a bit... I think Feynman diagrams were a bit of an afterthought in that edition... or maybe they appeared in the edition after :unsure:
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    Thanks both of you that’s great! I’m excited to start it now will make sure I check the spec and look at more recent stuff and problems too
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: February 28, 2018
The home of Results and Clearing

2,961

people online now

1,567,000

students helped last year

University open days

  1. SAE Institute
    Animation, Audio, Film, Games, Music, Business, Web Further education
    Thu, 16 Aug '18
  2. Bournemouth University
    Clearing Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 17 Aug '18
  3. University of Bolton
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 17 Aug '18
Poll
Do you want your parents to be with you when you collect your A-level results?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.