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Question regarding terminology in Quantum Physics watch

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    When learning about Quantum Physics & using revision guides/watching videos, I see a lot of phrases like "The photon model of light", and "photons of light" being used. Why is it that its always in relation to light, rather than the entire EM spectrum? I'm pretty sure a photon be a Gamma ray photon & an x-ray photon or even a ultraviolet photon (depending on its photon frequency of course), can't it?

    Do people just say "photons of light" out of convention since light is the only part of the EM spectrum we can see, similar to how "speed of light" is the conventional term even though all EM radiation travels at the 'speed of light', or what?
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    (Original post by SaintPablo)
    When learning about Quantum Physics & using revision guides/watching videos, I see a lot of phrases like "The photon model of light", and "photons of light" being used. Why is it that its always in relation to light, rather than the entire EM spectrum? I'm pretty sure a photon be a Gamma ray photon & an x-ray photon or even a ultraviolet photon (depending on its photon frequency of course), can't it?

    Do people just say "photons of light" out of convention since light is the only part of the EM spectrum we can see, similar to how "speed of light" is the conventional term even though all EM radiation travels at the 'speed of light', or what?
    Light can be used as a general term, it doesn't just mean visible light. Especially not in the context of quantum physics.
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    (Original post by SaintPablo)
    When learning about Quantum Physics & using revision guides/watching videos, I see a lot of phrases like "The photon model of light", and "photons of light" being used. Why is it that its always in relation to light, rather than the entire EM spectrum? I'm pretty sure a photon be a Gamma ray photon & an x-ray photon or even a ultraviolet photon (depending on its photon frequency of course), can't it?

    Do people just say "photons of light" out of convention since light is the only part of the EM spectrum we can see, similar to how "speed of light" is the conventional term even though all EM radiation travels at the 'speed of light', or what?
    Well you're correct - it's all photons and tbh gamma photons are quite often spoken about too... radio waves are also caused by photons but it's a bit less of a useful way to think about radio most of the time so you don't hear it so often.

    FWIW is used to describe EM radiation that's not in the visible part of the spectrum. e.g. the Diamond light source
    Which produce can produce photons between IR and x-ray

    But in written answers try and be as specific as possible as you might catch an examiner out... they're almost certain to be reading yours alongside lots of scripts from students who think the physical definition of light is visible light only, even at A level these days.
 
 
 
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