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Depression and a levels watch

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    Okay so basically im in the second year of my a levels and im really really struggling with my mental health right now. Ive had depression and anxiety for about 4 years now but its been manageable. However recently (pretty much around the time of my GCSE's) things started to get really bad and currently I find it really hard to get enough motivation to even get out of bed in the morning. as a result of this my mock results were CDU and my attendance is less than 80% thee has even been talk of kicking me off of one of my courses. I find it really hard to talk about my mental health problems with anybody at college and even worse at home as my mum has been diagnosed with terminal cancer and so we don't talk about much of my issues. But realistically im just terrified that I am going to fail my a levels because of lack of motivation and effort even though I have daily panic attacks while thinking about failing my exams or getting out of bed. Also I have briefly spoken to the college counselling service but I felt unable to talk to them as I didn't like the attention or the pity based on the assumption that I am depressed because of my mums illness which is not the case. Thank you to anybody who bothers to read this pathetic paragraph and id just like to say I am in no way asking for pity or attention I am simply seeking advice on what do to about my a levels because I am really wanting to go to university but at this point I don't even know if it will be an option any advice is much appreciated
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    hey , what you're going through sounds really *****y

    is there anyone you trust to talk about your feelings to , perhaps see a therapist they could prescribe you antidepressants to help you out
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    Hi there,

    It sounds like you're in a really awful situation, I'm so sorry to hear about how you're feeling and what your mum's going through. I can relate to how you're feeling through A levels a lot. I had depression and anxiety from a young age and it was heightened a lot in A levels, especially in the second year. Have you talked to your GP? If so, what treatment have the given or suggested if any? If talking face to face about how you're feeling is difficult there is online counselling that you find online or be referred to by your GP. Does your college know about your depression and anxiety? Or do any of your teachers personally know about it? I've found that my school knew, but my actual teachers didn't really know, so I found it helpful just letting them know, you don't have to go into loads of detail, I just said I was struggling, I have depression and anxiety and they were more understanding then. You can also try asking for extensions on work, sitting in a separate room for exams, having someone that just checks on you once a week or something. Again, you don't have to talk to them completely but sometimes it's nice to just have someone asking, so if you are really down and do want to talk, there's someone immediately there. Don't worry about whether you will fail your A Levels or not. There's still a lot of time to get support in place, you could even ask for your teachers to send the powerpoints and work to you at home so you could do some work from home, instead of feeling a pressure to go in. I've found if I feel pressure to go in but I'm having a low day, it makes me feel really guilty and I'm more likely to not go in. If you try and lift the pressure on yourself and talking to your teachers a bit more, asking about what your options are, it might help.

    Also, remember that A levels are not the be all and end all. If you fail your A levels, you will be okay. I failed my A levels and felt a bit lost but then I learned I could do another 2 year course (for free) and would get 3 A levels out of it and I could do it in a subject I enjoyed a bit more. This made me feel a lot better and now I'm in my 2nd year of that course with hopes of going to university next year (something I never thought would happen after A Levels) I had a counsellor who told me if I thought I was going to have a panic attack, just say in my head "who cares? I don't care. So what if I have a panic attack? I've had one before, it doesn't matter if I have one again". Easier said than done, and you don't have to even believe it, just saying it can help. Just being like, yeah I have anxiety...so? She uses the same technique if you're being bullied, you just tell them so? And act not bothered. It's sort of responding to the bully inside yourself, the bully in your head that is hurting you and I've found it really worked. You can apply that to your anxiety, depression, worrying about failing a levels, anything. Because at the end of the day, nothing completely terrible will happen. Your life will change and move forward, it doesn't just suddenly stop if you fail one thing.

    Sorry if this didn't help, no one would ever think you're doing this for pity or attention, don't worry. Remember, university is still an option for you!! Research some courses, find something you think you'd enjoy, if you don't really know what you want to do, find something that will give you some options in something that you are interested in. If you have any questions or just want someone to chat to, I'd be glad to anytime
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    Damn I was gonna say something but kosza432 did a way better job of me!
    I feel so terrible for you. Depression is a demon...
    I've seen the effects it has on my dad who suffers from bipolar disorder. But yeah, it's worth reaching out to help outside of school for your mental health. Just to stabilise you. Cause I can't think of anything harder than having to sit exams while you're unstable as hell :/
    (Btw I relate to the whole failing exam panic... When I'm doing work/revision in the evenings, my mind starts going in this whole cycle of "You're gonna fail your A-Levels" "You're not get into QMUL or SGUL (my firm & insurance), you're gonna go to a crappy uni and disappoint your parents" and it's... not fun. It happens quite often but it hasn't happened in the last few days which is relieving.)
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    Thankyou for the reply, I am thinking about going to see my GP about anti depressants as it really does affect my everyday life but the thought of contacting and going to the doctors alone terrifies me. College do not know I want to tell them but at the same time I don't want to be pitied or want my depression to be misunderstood as being sad about my mum. I have half told my mum by accident while having a slight breakdown but I don't feel comfortable talking to anybody really I kind of keep my feelings to my myself which probably isn't the best coping strategy but hey ho. some days are worse than others though I just want to be able to muster up the strength to revise and do my work.
    (Original post by kosza432)
    Hi there,

    It sounds like you're in a really awful situation, I'm so sorry to hear about how you're feeling and what your mum's going through. I can relate to how you're feeling through A levels a lot. I had depression and anxiety from a young age and it was heightened a lot in A levels, especially in the second year. Have you talked to your GP? If so, what treatment have the given or suggested if any? If talking face to face about how you're feeling is difficult there is online counselling that you find online or be referred to by your GP. Does your college know about your depression and anxiety? Or do any of your teachers personally know about it? I've found that my school knew, but my actual teachers didn't really know, so I found it helpful just letting them know, you don't have to go into loads of detail, I just said I was struggling, I have depression and anxiety and they were more understanding then. You can also try asking for extensions on work, sitting in a separate room for exams, having someone that just checks on you once a week or something. Again, you don't have to talk to them completely but sometimes it's nice to just have someone asking, so if you are really down and do want to talk, there's someone immediately there. Don't worry about whether you will fail your A Levels or not. There's still a lot of time to get support in place, you could even ask for your teachers to send the powerpoints and work to you at home so you could do some work from home, instead of feeling a pressure to go in. I've found if I feel pressure to go in but I'm having a low day, it makes me feel really guilty and I'm more likely to not go in. If you try and lift the pressure on yourself and talking to your teachers a bit more, asking about what your options are, it might help.

    Also, remember that A levels are not the be all and end all. If you fail your A levels, you will be okay. I failed my A levels and felt a bit lost but then I learned I could do another 2 year course (for free) and would get 3 A levels out of it and I could do it in a subject I enjoyed a bit more. This made me feel a lot better and now I'm in my 2nd year of that course with hopes of going to university next year (something I never thought would happen after A Levels) I had a counsellor who told me if I thought I was going to have a panic attack, just say in my head "who cares? I don't care. So what if I have a panic attack? I've had one before, it doesn't matter if I have one again". Easier said than done, and you don't have to even believe it, just saying it can help. Just being like, yeah I have anxiety...so? She uses the same technique if you're being bullied, you just tell them so? And act not bothered. It's sort of responding to the bully inside yourself, the bully in your head that is hurting you and I've found it really worked. You can apply that to your anxiety, depression, worrying about failing a levels, anything. Because at the end of the day, nothing completely terrible will happen. Your life will change and move forward, it doesn't just suddenly stop if you fail one thing.

    Sorry if this didn't help, no one would ever think you're doing this for pity or attention, don't worry. Remember, university is still an option for you!! Research some courses, find something you think you'd enjoy, if you don't really know what you want to do, find something that will give you some options in something that you are interested in. If you have any questions or just want someone to chat to, I'd be glad to anytime
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    (Original post by Ray_Shadows)
    hey , what you're going through sounds really *****y

    is there anyone you trust to talk about your feelings to , perhaps see a therapist they could prescribe you antidepressants to help you out
    Yeah I am considering going to see my GP but I know they are reluctant to help unless you are really suicidal or have had a recorded suicide attempt and even then it seems they tend to brush it off. I don't really like speaking to people about the severity of my illnesses I kind of make jokes to cope which makes people think im not serious and I hate it. Thankyou for replying and I was thinking about the possibility of online therapy as that would make me way less anxious and also be more reliable than going through CAHMS
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    (Original post by SugarBubbles2000)
    Damn I was gonna say something but kosza432 did a way better job of me!
    I feel so terrible for you. Depression is a demon...
    I've seen the effects it has on my dad who suffers from bipolar disorder. But yeah, it's worth reaching out to help outside of school for your mental health. Just to stabilise you. Cause I can't think of anything harder than having to sit exams while you're unstable as hell :/
    (Btw I relate to the whole failing exam panic... When I'm doing work/revision in the evenings, my mind starts going in this whole cycle of "You're gonna fail your A-Levels" "You're not get into QMUL or SGUL (my firm & insurance), you're gonna go to a crappy uni and disappoint your parents" and it's... not fun. It happens quite often but it hasn't happened in the last few days which is relieving.)
    Ive been struggling a lot more recently and that's what kinda kicked off my search for recovery because ive kinda just accepted it before this. I have been accepted into my local university with an unconditional but it wasn't my first choice university, I still find myself considering choosing it as my firm just incase I struggle too much and fail, I am finding chemistry at A Level almost impossible and I have no clue how to revise or improve my grades
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    (Original post by rwood20)
    Thankyou for the reply, I am thinking about going to see my GP about anti depressants as it really does affect my everyday life but the thought of contacting and going to the doctors alone terrifies me. College do not know I want to tell them but at the same time I don't want to be pitied or want my depression to be misunderstood as being sad about my mum. I have half told my mum by accident while having a slight breakdown but I don't feel comfortable talking to anybody really I kind of keep my feelings to my myself which probably isn't the best coping strategy but hey ho. some days are worse than others though I just want to be able to muster up the strength to revise and do my work.
    I know talking to a GP is difficult, it took me ages to get the courage to do it. Sometimes though you just have to do things without thinking, one day I just woke up, rang them, told them my symptoms and now I'm seeing them every few weeks and getting medication. If you think about it too much it will prevent you from doing it. When you're talking to them you could detach yourself from it a little, pretend in your head your listing the symptoms someones else is having. You could also write down what you want to say, or talk to someone at childline on the 1 to 1 chat and they can help you plan out what to do. College won't pity you, if you talk to your GP you could actually ask them to tell college for you and they can tell them it's not related to your mum's illness. I find talking to childline really helpful because it's an online chat, they don't know who you are and they will just listen, it's good if you just need to vent. The best way to get motivated to do your work will be telling someone how you're feeling. Honestly, that in itself will relieve some tension just to say "okay good I've told someone". College and your GP will be able to support you, extend your deadlines and everything and with less pressure on yourself you'll find the motivation to do work

    I can't stress enough how much better talking to a GP will be for you. I know it's really hard but the sooner you do it, the better you'll feel If you need a chat or someone to listen, I'm here if you need me
 
 
 
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