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62% of students and recent graduates have experienced sexual violence. watch

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    If you have a sexual violence survey sent to your uni email, along with 500 emails of varying relevance, are you more likely to respond to the survey if you have experienced sexual violence? Or are you more likely to respond if you have not experienced sexual violence, and implicitly the survey bears little relevance to you and your life?

    62% is surprisingly high, and I don't trust the veracity of these random surveys.
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    (Original post by Notoriety)
    If you have a sexual violence survey sent to your uni email, along with 500 emails of varying relevance, are you more likely to respond to the survey if you have experienced sexual violence? Or are you more likely to respond if you have not experienced sexual violence, and implicitly the survey bears little relevance to you and your life?

    62% is surprisingly high, and I don't trust the veracity of these random surveys.
    I was thinking about that possibility, it does seem to me that more people that haven't experienced sexual harassment wouldn't participate in the survey, as opposed to people who have experienced this, as they wouldn't have much interest/concern, especially when having to put in the time for the study..
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    I'm glad some of you appear to find this so funny...

    As for going to the police? Admitting you've been sexually assaulted or whatever really isn't that easy. I've had it happen to me. I didn't know the guy at all. I was scared and having had bad experiences with the police before, (not related to sexual violence; but an ex-friend harassing me) I didn't know if I could trust them to do anything. Oh, and he told me he didn't even live down here. So what exactly could they do? All I knew was that he was black, the same age as me and lived in Tottenham. Yeah, there are probably hundreds, if not thousands of men who are the same...

    Admittedly, I am always unsure on these stats because there are going to be people out there who won't admit (even though as I understand it, these surveys are anonymous) something like this has happened to them.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    I'm glad some of you appear to find this so funny...
    Who views it as such?
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    The sample size is too small to make a judgement
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    This "finding" is based on a survey on an online forum...about as inaccurate and unreliable a source can be. You cannot in any way shape or form confirm any of your respondents claims... and you do not control for respondent bias in your survey and people have a vested interest in giving certain answers...additionally you do not control for multiple replies...Surveys are an extremely inaccurate form of assessing sexual harassment. Also, how do you define sexual violence and harassment? That's an important detail that you guys seem to have left out...

    Additionally you partnered with a feminist organisation in this survey of yours and you do not declare this conflict of interest:

    https://revoltsexualassault.com

    This "finding" is about as unreliable as unreliable gets. The results page as well as this thread seems to also go out of its way to avoid telling the reader that this survey was conducted on a forum online.......without any form of control over who responds to it..you call it a national consultation....its not a national consultation....its an unreliable survey conducted on a forum run by mostly feminists in partnership with a feminist organisation using leading questions aimed to prove a forgone conclusion...
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    (Original post by The RAR)
    I am guessing most of these students who have been "abused" are females, no offense but I get this feeling that it's simply not true and the female students may be over exaggerating, sure there are males who can be flirty and all that but sexual violence? A uni student knows better than that.
    Just my point of view and keep in mind I am not supporting sexual violence in any way.
    If a person sees it as sexual abuse then it is sexual abuse. I believe that it is very common to shout at other students in a sexual manner which already is sexual abuse. I also don’t believe that the amount of females and males that have been sexually abused is that different. You also make it sound like females couldn’t sexually abuse males.
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    (Original post by HateOCR)
    The sample size is too small to make a judgement
    The size is not what matters here, there is one thing that should be on anyone's mind immediately, if they know anything about statistics. But the size is plenty. Why do you say this?
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    A year and a half ago I got attacked on the tube. Some manky man came up behind me, covered my mouth with one hand and tried to stuff his hand down my trousers with the other.

    My friend reported it to the police and after a few days of them failing to find the CCTV footage (I'm not sure if it was ever retrieved eventually), I was asked if I wanted to press charges. I didn't want what happened to me to happen to anybody else, but I am at university and couldn't commit to being free at all times to attend a court case. I asked what would happen if I wanted to press charges but then was not available for anything involved with this, and I was told that I would be charged for wasting police time!

    If a similar thing were to happen to me again I wouldn't bother informing the police as they clearly don't care. Every time they spoke to me on the phone they were extremely patronising and I was shocked at the conclusion that was reached. In the end I chose not to press charges (and honestly, I don't think that it is at all unreasonable that I would have other priorities e.g. exams.) The low-life that did this got off scot-free (heh... apart from what I did to him... apparently if you try to grab my mouth I BITE :lol: ) and I can only hope that he hasn't pulled his kind of sick stunt on anyone else.

    For everyone complaining that sexual assault is not something that needs to be reported to the university if the perpetrator has business there... yes it absolutely is? :lolwut: Universities have a responsibility to ensure that campus is a safe environment for everybody, and if sexually assaulting someone isn't grounds for disciplinary action then I'd like to know what is. Not to mention that for many vocational courses, sexual assault would call in to question the aggressor's fitness to practice.
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    (Original post by yudothis)
    The size is not what matters here, there is one thing that should be on anyone's mind immediately, if they know anything about statistics. But the size is plenty. Why do you say this?
    I don’t think the statistic is representative because the sample is small. But yes, if that many students are actually facing mental health issues then action should be taken.
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    I think what counts as "sexual violence" these days is a little broad. I personally don't consider harassment to be violent behavior.

    Secondly, surveys like this have questionable reliability, particularly as there's no way to vet the answers, and people who choose to take the survey are more likely to have something to say than the average person.

    This being said, I've been groped by women (without my consent) several times at parties and gatherings, but I it's never actually bothered me. From my experience and observations, women can be just as gropey as men, but they get away with it because it's seen as being more acceptable.
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    (Original post by Little Tail Chaser)
    A year and a half ago I got attacked on the tube. Some manky man came up behind me, covered my mouth with one hand and tried to stuff his hand down my trousers with the other.

    My friend reported it to the police and after a few days of them failing to find the CCTV footage (I'm not sure if it was ever retrieved eventually), I was asked if I wanted to press charges. I didn't want what happened to me to happen to anybody else, but I am at university and couldn't commit to being free at all times to attend a court case. I asked what would happen if I wanted to press charges but then was not available for anything involved with this, and I was told that I would be charged for wasting police time!
    In the UK people are only ever charged with wasting police time if they are proven to have made a false accusation....interesting, no?
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    I think what the discussion around this (and indeed other movements that are going on) is that the issue of nomenclature is critical here. We seem to be seeing a broadening or personal definitions of what people deem sexual harassment or assault. This can be a very personal thing. For example, I wouldn't say a stranger I pass on the street calling me "babe" is sexual harassment, but I know that some other people would feel this is sexual harassment.

    When it comes to calling for punitive action, it's important to make sure that a personal definition of sexual harassment or assault (which should be reasonably respected) is in line with the legal definition of sexual harassment or assault. Perhaps the laws need to change to accommodate a broadening definition of sexual harassment and assault, but it's also possible that while a person may feel victimised by an action they feel constitutes harassment, this may not constitute an offence from a legal perspective.

    Bearing in mind the above, it would be ideal if students reported what they felt as sexual harassment to universities, as while the harassment may not constitute a criminal offence, it still may breach codes of conduct within a university and the university may be able to investigate and take certain action against perpetrators of sexual harassment. Of course we still have ways to go to make an atmosphere where everyone can be heard and feel safe to report things.
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    (Original post by CookieButter)
    In the UK people are only ever charged with wasting police time if they are proven to have made a false accusation....interesting, no?
    I'm just parroting what I was told by the police on the phone :dontknow: I was certainly under that impression before the call. Obviously I was under the assumption that without me present to testify it would be difficult to find him guilty of anything, but him being found not guilty is different for the charges being turned around and put on me. Either way it was a really disappointing experience from the police, hence why I wouldn't bother again.

    Also I'm not lying if that was your implication
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    (Original post by jestersnow)

    Bearing in mind the above, it would be ideal if students reported what they felt as sexual harassment to universities, as while the harassment may not constitute a criminal offence, it still may breach codes of conduct within a university and the university may be able to investigate and take certain action against perpetrators of sexual harassment. Of course we still have ways to go to make an atmosphere where everyone can be heard and feel safe to report things.
    Which could lead to (most likely) boys being expelled or suspended based on the subjective feelings of another student.

    Universities don't have a good track record of handling cases of sexual misconduct (or alleged sexual misconduct) very well at all.
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    (Original post by HighOnGoofballs)
    I'm the furthest thing from a feminist, but that's a disppicable attitude to have.
    Each to their own opinions I guess
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    (Original post by Dandaman1)
    Which could lead to (most likely) boys being expelled or suspended based on the subjective feelings of another student.

    Universities don't have a good track record of handling cases of sexual misconduct (or alleged sexual misconduct) very well at all.
    So we protect boys cause they are only allegedly abusers while we keep on letting girl be harassed?
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    (Original post by Little Tail Chaser)
    I was under the assumption that without me present to testify it would be difficult to find him guilty of anything,
    In the UK all rape/sexual assault accusers are not required to attend court. They are allowed special measures such that they do not have to attend court and their anonymity is protected sometimes even from the accused...interesting, no?
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    I wouldn't put harassment and violence in the same basket. And considering the modern society, a person can claim that he was harassed literally by any action as long as he thinks that he's hurt. (or for some petty reason)

    P.S. at least 56% thought it wasn't serious enough. some hope in humanity restored.
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    (Original post by Dandaman1)
    Which could lead to (most likely) boys being expelled or suspended based on the subjective feelings of another student.

    Universities don't have a good track record of handling cases of sexual misconduct (or alleged sexual misconduct) very well at all.
    Except that discipline wouldn't be based on the victim's reaction to what happened, it would be based on the actions of the person who carried out the assault. Using the example given above, some people may find being referred to as 'babe' to be inappropriate and may be offended by this, but I find it very difficult to believe that a student would ever be suspended over this, no matter how much of a big deal was made of it. Of course in many cases it comes down to one person's word against another, but again I am doubtful that anybody would be punished if there was absolutely no evidence to support the claims. This is why I support people in reporting any instances of sexual assault to the university, as previous reports against person could act as evidence in future cases of accused misconduct.
 
 
 
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