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    Interesting modules, lecturers, etc.
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    (Original post by JustSomeone19)
    Interesting modules, lecturers, etc.
    As much as it used to frustrate me as an institution, Warwick's options have gone from strength to strength and in recent years have really rounded out to form an impressive range. Lots of interdisciplinary modules.

    Also, its unusual approach is "law in context" rather than black-letter law (like most institutions), so even the more humdrum/qualifying modules are a bit more interesting.
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    (Original post by JustSomeone19)
    Interesting modules, lecturers, etc.
    They're all pretty similar, module-wise. Lecturers are always going to be hit and miss. Even if a first-year student has very good lecturers on their first-year modules, there is no guaranteed you'd be taught by the same lecturers.

    The differences in modules. Well, the problem is there is no guaranteed they'd be on offer when you rock up there! The "law in context" is just a buzzword which means nothing. I was taught "law in context" first year and black letter law in second and third year. No difference! I studied at a purely black letter law school for LLM and no difference. Don't be hoodwinked by the PR spin.
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    (Original post by JustSomeone19)
    Interesting modules, lecturers, etc.
    Impossible to generalise. It depends on what you deem 'interesting'. Oxbridge have nice detailed Roman Law modules for those who find civil law theory interesting. SOAS offers Islamic Law. LSE and Durham have extensive sociolegal/criminological modules available for undergraduates (even if they're formally reserved for postgrads on the course guides). Southampton and UCL both offer shipping law, which makes them popular with overseas students who come from jurisdictions where a lot of legal work arises from maritime law (e.g. Dubai, Greece, etc).

    The 7 core qualifying subjects are and likely will stay the same even after 2020. Beyond that, different unis will mix and match their company law, admin law, IT/IP law modules, but these modules remain similar at their core.

    The stuff I've heard and seen about 'problem based learning' seems like a cheap ad trick. Not least because no-one bothers to define what on earth it is or why you'd want to do it. Ditto for some nonsense projects that encourage students to collaborate to build their own law firm/enterprise (something useless for the 90% of us that aren't entrepreneurial and have other interests that compete with the former for time).
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    (Original post by JohanGRK)
    Impossible to generalise. It depends on what you deem 'interesting'. Oxbridge have nice detailed Roman Law modules for those who find civil law theory interesting. SOAS offers Islamic Law. LSE and Durham have extensive sociolegal/criminological modules available for undergraduates (even if they're formally reserved for postgrads on the course guides). Southampton and UCL both offer shipping law, which makes them popular with overseas students who come from jurisdictions where a lot of legal work arises from maritime law (e.g. Dubai, Greece, etc).

    The 7 core qualifying subjects are and likely will stay the same even after 2020. Beyond that, different unis will mix and match their company law, admin law, IT/IP law modules, but these modules remain similar at their core.

    The stuff I've heard and seen about 'problem based learning' seems like a cheap ad trick. Not least because no-one bothers to define what on earth it is or why you'd want to do it. Ditto for some nonsense projects that encourage students to collaborate to build their own law firm/enterprise (something useless for the 90% of us that aren't entrepreneurial and have other interests that compete with the former for time).
    Does UCL have a shipping speciality? I was under the impression that was KCL.
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    (Original post by Notoriety)
    Does UCL have a shipping speciality? I was under the impression that was KCL.
    They do offer an LLM in it, and it seems that several faculty members have backgrounds in it, even thought I thought that a shipping-related law module would have been available at undergrad as well... That's odd - I've met a few past or present undergrads there who take it.

    KCL also offers an LLM in Maritime Law (yay I guess)

    UCL has a Roman Law module as an option in third year too little too late
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    (Original post by JohanGRK)
    They do offer an LLM in it, and it seems that several faculty members have backgrounds in it, even thought I thought that a shipping-related law module would have been available at undergrad as well... That's odd - I've met a few past or present undergrads there who take it.

    KCL also offers an LLM in Maritime Law (yay I guess)

    UCL has a Roman Law module as an option in third year too little too late
    Maritime is great, man; just give it a chance!

    Ahh, makes sense; a few places are doing maritime LLMs now. I think the specialism is more Southampton than it is UCL, though. I say maritime is common; as a maritime specialist I happily chose one of the few places which doesn't do a standard maritime module on the LLM (beyond law of the sea PIL tosh) -- my luck. It is growing quite prevalent nonetheless.
 
 
 
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