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    (Original post by Kyber Ninja)
    admission is still significantly easier - keyword being significantly.

    Oxford's acceptance rate has decreased by roughly 100%. So please, do tell why the deviation isn't significant?

    How is ABB in 2003 = to A*AA now where did you come up with a 3 grade increase? a roughly 24% A*/A in 2017 vs 21.6% in 2003? Jesus.


    Also, ICL and UCL were winning Nobel Prizes and being famed well before the new millennia. I imagine LSE is similar.
    First off, your constant misquoting makes you very annoying to talk to.

    I never claimed ABB in 2003 is A*AA in 2018. Read my comment again.

    Also why did you gloss over my entire comment just to push your Oxbridge agenda. You addressed none of my points.
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    (Original post by Appleorpear)
    First off, your constant misquoting and stupidity makes you very annoying to talk to.

    I never claimed ABB in 2003 is A*AA in 2018. Read my comment again.

    Also why did you gloss over my entire comment just to push your Oxbridge agenda. You addressed none of my points.
    Insults are not needed. If you don't want to talk to him, don't reply.
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    (Original post by Notoriety)
    Insults are not needed. If you don't want to talk to him, don't reply.
    I'm sorry but it's ridiculous to talk to someone who misquotes something in every single reply. If the OP didn't write like that people wouldn't instantly dismiss the (very interesting) thread topic which he has butchered.
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    (Original post by Appleorpear)
    I too think that unis have become harder to get into, but nowhere near as much as your (often misquoted) views.

    Maths went from 36.6% getting A's to 17.5% getting A* and 24.3% getting A from 2003 to 2018. 36.6% A goes to 41.8% A*/A. That means grades have gotten inflated, and no doubt even more inflated form 1999 to 2003 as shown earlier in the thread. AAB-ABB is pretty equal to A*AA-AAA nowadays,
    You used 2003 as a data set. straight after you said ABB is equal to A*AA, unless you meant AAB is equal to A*AA and ABB = to AAA. If so, be more specific, because the way you've written it can technically interpreted as A*AA = ABB or A*AA = AAB. I went with the former, simply because of how outrageous this sounds.

    So how is that a misquote? If anything it's misinterpretation but that stems from the way you've written it.

    And I didn't reply to the other stuff because I don't see how it's relevant to the thread, No one's arguing against those points about STEM/Warwick etc.. Though the London unis have been popular for a long time.
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    We had to rank choices in my day. One political hot mess.
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    (Original post by DrSocSciences)
    We had to rank choices in my day. One political hot mess.
    That sounds so interesting and so awful at the same time

    Maybe thats where the Durham myth came from*

    *That they reject Oxbridge applicants who prefer Oxbridge to them.
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    (Original post by Kyber Ninja)
    You used 2003 as a data set. straight after you said ABB is equal to A*AA, unless you meant AAB is equal to A*AA and ABB = to AAA. If so, be more specific, because the way you've written it can technically interpreted as A*AA = ABB or A*AA = AAB. I went with the former, simply because of how outrageous this sounds.

    So how is that a misquote? If anything it's misinterpretation but that stems from the way you've written it.

    And I didn't reply to the other stuff because I don't see how it's relevant to the thread, No one's arguing against those points about STEM/Warwick etc.. Though the London unis have been popular for a long time.
    "AAB-ABB is pretty equal to A*AA-AAA"

    It's common sense that AAB is equal to A*AA here.

    Also why do you say "admission is still significantly easier - keyword being significantly."? Isn't the point of this thread to talk about how it is harder?

    And finally how is the change in tuition fees, STEM vs humanities and AEA not relavant? Previously you mentioned how STEM had lower reqs than humanities, and this whole thread is about increasing reqs, so I gave the reasons for it which you then ignored.
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    (Original post by Appleorpear)
    "AAB-ABB is pretty equal to A*AA-AAA"

    It's common sense that AAB is equal to A*AA here.

    Also why do you say "admission is still significantly easier - keyword being significantly."? Isn't the point of this thread to talk about how it is harder?

    And finally how is the change in tuition fees, STEM vs humanities and AEA not relavant? Previously you mentioned how STEM had lower reqs than humanities, and this whole thread is about increasing reqs, so I gave the reasons for it which you then ignored.
    Not necessarily; you said the range AAB-ABB is "pretty equal" to the range A*AA-AAA

    If I pick ABB in that range, mathematically, it would still satisfy the A*AA-AAA range.

    And I ignored it because I agree.

    Calling admissions easier then is essentially a statement saying that admissions is harder now.

    Anyway, I sent out a FOI for the % combinations of people getting AAA, AAB, ABB throughout the existence of A Levels, so in a few weeks I'l update this thread
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    (Original post by Kyber Ninja)
    Not necessarily; you said the range AAB-ABB is "pretty equal" to the range A*AA-AAA

    If I pick ABB in that range, mathematically, it would still satisfy the A*AA-AAA range.

    And I ignored it because I agree.

    Calling admissions easier then is essentially a statement saying that admissions is harder now.

    Anyway, I sent out a FOI for the % combinations of people getting AAA, AAB, ABB throughout the existence of A Levels, so in a few weeks I'l update this thread
    Except many unis say explicitly on their offers A*AA-AAA and AAB-ABB. You don't compare the lowest to the highest.

    Also you said "admission is still significantly easier". That's present tense.

    But yes, update me when you get the results. Have you made sure you said AAA or better, or otherwise there will be an indicated drop when the A* is released.
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    (Original post by Appleorpear)
    Except many unis say explicitly on their offers A*AA-AAA and AAB-ABB. You don't compare the lowest to the highest.

    Also you said "admission is still significantly easier". That's present tense.

    But yes, update me when you get the results. Have you made sure you said AAA or better, or otherwise there will be an indicated drop when the A* is released.
    Doonesbury posted this years combination. So we'll use that as the comparison point.

    I asked for years 2000, 1995, 1990, 1985, 1980, 1975, 1970, 1965, 1963 (when A Levels became lettered)
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    (Original post by Kyber Ninja)
    Doonesbury posted this years combination. So we'll use that as the comparison point.

    I asked for years 2000, 1995, 1990, 1985, 1980, 1975, 1970, 1965, 1963 (when A Levels became lettered)
    Why not 2005, 2010, 2015?

    Also you need the number of university places for context:



    https://www.timeshighereducation.com...005873.article
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    (Original post by Kyber Ninja)
    Doonesbury posted this years combination. So we'll use that as the comparison point.

    I asked for years 2000, 1995, 1990, 1985, 1980, 1975, 1970, 1965, 1963 (when A Levels became lettered)
    Also

    Name:  Screen Shot 2018-03-02 at 18.28.56.jpg
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    https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/reque...coming-1108424
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    (Original post by Kyber Ninja)
    What were admissions like back then? German unis let anyone in, as long as you pass high school. Only problem is that 80% drop out...

    The most famous one is probably Thomas Wolsey - probably never be topped.
    Lord Mackay of Clashfern came from a similar lowly family background in much more recent times, and also became Lord Chancellor; Wolsely's father is said to have been a butcher, Mackay's was a railway signalman.

    My father and James Mackay were in the same class at primary school in Edinburgh, each getting bursaries to different secondary schools. James went on to Edinburgh and later Cambridge University my father to Oxford and later Edinburgh University, both ending up in the legal profession.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_...y_of_Clashfern
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Why not 2005, 2010, 2015?

    Also you need the number of university places for context:



    https://www.timeshighereducation.com...005873.article
    I would've thought 2010 and 2015 would've been identical? and 2000 would be identical with 2005?

    Here's a 2012 one for reference

    http://www.cambridgeassessment.org.u...el-in-2012.pdf

    This is also an interesting read on the most common A Level subject combinations - science and maths dominate. Could one make the argument for a rise in STEM uptake being responsible partially for the increased A*/A? Also note that 1/4 of people take less than 3 A Levels and I don't how commonly they're involved in calculation.A lot of them do mention 3 in terms of number of subjects, but is 3 subjects at CCC better than 2 at A*A*?

    http://www.cambridgeassessment.org.u...jects-2015.pdf
    I don't know what assumptions have been taken

    700,000 people take GCSE, yet roughly 150,000 achieve 3 A Levels. Thats a huge drop out rate/omission rate.

    https://www.gov.uk/government/public...e-combinations

    based off this calculations involve everyone taking at least one A Level subject, not three, since the 2015 document shows around 260,000 do at least one A Level, but roughly only 150,000 do three. All our data is relative to 1-2 A level takers too.
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    (Original post by DJKL)
    Lord Mackay of Clashfern came from a similar lowly family background in much more recent times, and also became Lord Chancellor; Wolsely's father is said to have been a butcher, Mackay's was a railway signalman.

    My father and James Mackay were in the same class at primary school in Edinburgh, each getting bursaries to different secondary schools. James went on to Edinburgh and later Cambridge University my father to Oxford and later Edinburgh University, both ending up in the legal profession.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_...y_of_Clashfern
    That's probably the biggest coincidence I've seen on this forum.
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    If you want a real benchmark from earlier in time, I sat my Scottish Highers in 1977/1978 ending up with BBBBC. Edinburgh, in 1980 ,accepted me on the basis of these when there was only circa 8,000 undergraduates in total at the university, so circa 2,000 undergraduate admission places in a year.

    My wife's was also admitted to Edinburgh in 1978 but I think she has one A in her five.

    There are now over three times that number of admissions each year at a much higher tariff (BBBBC would not give me a chance) which suggests strongly there has been a fair degree of grade inflation in the intervening years to account for the disparity. Very few students back then got 5 highers at A, in 1974 in my sister's year I only recall two (I remember this because she was one of them and they were made joint Dux of the school being a pretty rare event for more than one pupil achieving 5 As in a year).
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    (Original post by DJKL)
    If you want a real benchmark from earlier in time, I sat my Scottish Highers in 1977/1978 ending up with BBBBC. Edinburgh, in 1980 ,accepted me on the basis of these when there was only circa 8,000 undergraduates in total at the university, so circa 2,000 undergraduate admission places in a year.

    My wife's was also admitted to Edinburgh in 1978 but I think she has one A in her five.

    There are now over three times that number of admissions each year at a much higher tariff (BBBBC would not give me a chance) which suggests strongly there has been a fair degree of grade inflation in the intervening years to account for the disparity. Very few students back then got 5 highers at A, in 1974 in my sister's year I only recall two (I remember this because she was one of them and they were made joint Dux of the school being a pretty rare event for more than one pupil achieving 5 As in a year).
    There's certainly been inflation in the 70s and 80s. It just seems uncertain to what extent it has happened in the 90s
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    (Original post by DJKL)
    If you want a real benchmark from earlier in time, I sat my Scottish Highers in 1977/1978 ending up with BBBBC. Edinburgh, in 1980 ,accepted me on the basis of these when there was only circa 8,000 undergraduates in total at the university, so circa 2,000 undergraduate admission places in a year.

    My wife's was also admitted to Edinburgh in 1978 but I think she has one A in her five.

    There are now over three times that number of admissions each year at a much higher tariff (BBBBC would not give me a chance) which suggests strongly there has been a fair degree of grade inflation in the intervening years to account for the disparity. Very few students back then got 5 highers at A, in 1974 in my sister's year I only recall two (I remember this because she was one of them and they were made joint Dux of the school being a pretty rare event for more than one pupil achieving 5 As in a year).
    Edinburgh was accepting BBBBB (for engineering) as recently as 2008. Supply and demand and "contextual" factors also come into play, too.

    I think what might have happened is that at select universities - and at many of these, some select courses - might have simply pulled away from the rest in terms of admissions requirements due to much more intense competition. We're seeing (or hearing) of some universities really having to try to compete for students (e.g. unconditional if firmed offers) whereas others are able to continually increase their entrance requirements.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    Edinburgh was accepting BBBBB (for engineering) as recently as 2008. Supply and demand and "contextual" factors also come into play, too.

    I think what might have happened is that at select universities - and at many of these, some select courses - might have simply pulled away from the rest in terms of admissions requirements due to much more intense competition. We're seeing (or hearing) of some universities really having to try to compete for students (e.g. unconditional if firmed offers) whereas others are able to continually increase their entrance requirements.
    Also higher entry tariffs enhance league rankings.

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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Also higher entry tariffs enhance league rankings.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Indirectly I imagine, and with a cap? Isn't it based on the student's grades? Similar to complete university guide with entry standards?
 
 
 

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