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President Putin unveils "invincible" nuclear weapons watch

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    (Original post by Palmyra)
    Most of the things 'unveiled' by Russia are not actually new and have been known about for a few years now. Regardless, Russia's existing ICBMs are more than capable of beating the US's missile defence systems so these announcements aren't really that significant.

    Lest we forget that this new arms race was precipitated by the US's unilateral withdrawal from the ABM Treaty and subsequent expansion of NATO forces to Russia's borders.
    Not to mention when they burned Iraq to the ground sending not only the signal that the Russians could whistle for all the Americans cared but that they too could be next on the chopping block.
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    Perhaps he should consider something along the lines of, oh, I don't know...
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    (Original post by Palmyra)
    These things have been in the works for many years and known about since the Obama adminstration.
    Trump is still nuts
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    (Original post by Palmyra)
    You keep talking about Soviet legacy, but without explaining why the US hasn't been able to reach 70s Soviet/Russian technology despite being the world's sole superpower for several decades and having a military budget 10x the size of Russia's.
    Military budget does not mean "inventing new technologies". USA has a lot of troops, vehicles, missiles and others and it requires money to support. Inventions require money too. And also I wouldn't call it as not being able to reach it is more about profits - in USA the government is not the sole entity like in SU where the leader was close to the emperor that decide the policy.

    It is the same reason why people could fly to Moon 30-40 years ago, but can't do now - money. During space race the reason was potential space war - now it is more about rockets.

    Also Soviets had a lot of great engineers but completely moronic government.
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    (Original post by CookieButter)
    I read that the cruise missile is nuclear powered. So it has limitless range. This is insane!!! If its true, which it most likely is this is ground breaking stuff. Gone is the era where missiles have range...lol
    The Americans actually designed and built one back during the Cold War - bloody nasty thing as it spewed radiation out the back. Before it was binned i believe the idea of it was to simply fly it back and forth over the USSR and poison all and sunder.
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    (Original post by Tempest II)
    Putin is very much continuing his tough man act that apparently plays well with the Russian people.
    Russia's nuclear arsenal hasn't really been in danger from US ABM systems that'd get overwhelmed should the unthinkable happen.

    It's good to see that Putin has also decided to prevent his only realistic rival from running in the election. Not exactly increasing freedom & democracy.

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/201...rty-six-years/
    Putin does not continue his "Tough Man" act (CNN journalist image making ) to appeal to Russians. All he does is to defend the interest of Russian people. Russian military spending on anti-ballistic defence technology is far greater than those of Striking ballistic missiles. By the way, the Military doctrine of Russian federation has always been defensive, and furthermore, it has been like so for centuries. Russia very rarely invaded any country.
    There is no rival for Putin, he has 86% popularity rate, so it would be absolutely illogical and stupid for any president to do something like preventing opponents from running in the election so that the western media could make the coverage on that for the zombie herd that populates most of western world.
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    (Original post by Stolyarov Daniel)
    Putin does not continue his "Tough Man" act (CNN journalist image making ) to appeal to Russians. All he does is to defend the interest of Russian people. Russian military spending on anti-ballistic defence technology is far greater than those of Striking ballistic missiles. By the way, the Military doctrine of Russian federation has always been defensive, and furthermore, it has been like so for centuries. Russia very rarely invaded any country.

    There is no rival for Putin, he has 86% popularity rate, so it would be absolutely illogical and stupid for any president to do something like preventing opponents from running in the election so that the western media could make the coverage on that for the zombie herd that populates most of western world.
    The ability of Vladimir Putin to remain in power depends on several factors - one is the backing of the Russian oligarchs, many of them ex-KGB like himself. This has been obtained by ensuring they remain wealthy, appealing to their patriotic spirit and/or, when necessary, threatening them with legal action (as he did with companies when he was the mayor of St Peterburg in the early 1990s. Putin himself is said to be worth somewhere in the region of $2 billion US dollars. As long as he is championing the oligarch's cause then they will back him.
    Two is keeping the Russian people onside. There's no doubt he is popular but it's unclear how doctored that is. There's no doubt that the Russian people like strong leaders so it's easy to understand why Putin ensures he appears this way. Democracy certainly doesn't have the same appeal as it does in the West - Russians seem to take hold economic policy, strong government etc as preferable. Considering that Russia's history is littered with dictatorships this isn't a huge surprise.


    I'm sure that you'll try to tell otherwise but Russia's press is not free. RT is little more than a mouthpiece for the Kremlin & is incredibly biased. Many other Russian news outlets have been closed down or censored, journalists have been threatened or murdered etc.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...piece-by-piece

    According to Freedom House's 2015 report, Russia lies 180 out of 199 nations - behind some rather unpleasant regimes & on par with Saudi Arabia with a score of 83. For comparison, the UK scored 24. A challenger standing against Putin has to overcome significant media bias & obstacles thrown in their path by the Kremlin so their being no notable candidate isn't particularly surprising.

    I recognise that the Russian mindset when it comes to defence is somewhat different than the West's. Both the Russia Federation and the former USSR both have interesting track records in this area - the Soviet Union used the entire of Eastern Europe as a defensive buffer zone. Many in Russia still see Eastern European nations, certainly Belarus, the Ukraine, Georgia, Moldova, Armenia Estonia, Lithuania and Latvia as being very much within the Russian sphere of influence. While I'm sure you'll argue that NATO & the EU should not have expanded that for east, if the elected government of said nation requested to join then why should either of these two organisations turn them down? Maybe Russia should have been a better ally to them & not driven them into the West's arms?
    The Putin administration has made it clear that they class attacks on Russian speakers outside of his nation's borders as a trigger for military action. Russia is not above handing out Russian passports in Eastern Europe, then launching false flag attacks and/or claiming the the nation's government has attacked the speakers/passport holders within its neighbours & then sending in its military, mixed with a health hybrid of mercenaries & local rebels to secure the region. To class this a defensive measure blurs the line considerably.

    The crazy thing is Putin doesn't even deny that Russia is happy to interfere in Eastern Europe.
    Spoiler:
    Show


    To the European Union and the West:*“You finally have to stop trampling over Russia’s interests. Do you not get it? How long are we going to play this game? We thought we made it very clear in Georgia in 2008 that we are prepared to stand up for our interests, take the risks of military intervention. We can suffer sanctions and deal with any political and economic pain you can inflict. We have a higher threshold for pain than you do. Have you forgotten our national narrative and the siege of Leningrad? Do you want to go to war over Ukraine? We don’t, but we’re ready to if*youdon’t back down and back off!”

    To Ukraine and the prospective new leadership in Kyiv: “We’ve warned you and your predecessors repeatedly. What were you expecting when you said you were going to continue with the Association Agreement? We took action against Georgia in 2008 over MAP. We would have taken action against Ukraine too in 2008 if you had kept on pressing like the Georgians, and you know it. Russia is the decisive factor in any major political and economic decision here, not the European Union, not NATO, not the United States, not the West. As you saw with Georgia in 2008, they will not and cannot protect you. Now Crimea is gone. Eastern and southern Ukraine could go too—unless all of you in Kyiv start to take Russia’s interests into consideration first and foremost. We will keep a grip on these territories to make sure this is crystal clear at all times.”

    To Georgia, Moldova, Armenia, and all the other states that used to be part of the Soviet Union: “We hope you’ve really got the message now. If you’re thinking of transitions and new deals with other great powers, like Association Agreements, think of us first. We have plenty of levers we can use against you, and you know what they are. Remember––nothing really belongs to you, not even your own territory or all of your population, and you will always have to pay your tribute to Moscow.” There is a special message embedded in here for the Baltic states: “You may think you have escaped and are safe beyond the EU’s and NATO’s red lines, but can you be sure they can protect you? Remember you still have lots of Russian speakers inside your borders"

    To the Domestic Russian Opposition: Those of you who took to the streets in 2011 and 2011, don’t get any more ideas. If you mobilize outside of scheduled elections and start protesting again, like they just did in Kyiv, we’ll come down on you hard. And it won’t just be the lawbooks we throw at you. Nasty business with those snipers on Maidan … so much for peaceful protests.”

    To the Broader Russian Population: “The Ukrainians just couldn’t get their act together. See what poor governance and then protests bring. They bring complete chaos, loss of life and property, and outside intervention and manipulation; and they push extremists to the top. You have protection at home and abroad. Would you want to trade what you have now for that? If you want to avoid what’s happening in Kyiv, you’d better stick with me, Vladimir Putin, the statist, the survivalist––the man who restored the state and Russia’s great power status after the disasters of the 1990s; the man who has given you 14 years of stability and prosperity!”

    https://www.brookings.edu/articles/m...gs-part-three/

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    (Original post by Tempest II)
    The ability of Vladimir Putin to remain in power depends on several factors - one is the backing of the Russian oligarchs, many of them ex-KGB like himself. This has been obtained by ensuring they remain wealthy, appealing to their patriotic spirit and/or, when necessary, threatening them with legal action (as he did with companies when he was the mayor of St Peterburg in the early 1990s. Putin himself is said to be worth somewhere in the region of $2 billion US dollars. As long as he is championing the oligarch's cause then they will back him.
    Two is keeping the Russian people onside. There's no doubt he is popular but it's unclear how doctored that is. There's no doubt that the Russian people like strong leaders so it's easy to understand why Putin ensures he appears this way. Democracy certainly doesn't have the same appeal as it does in the West - Russians seem to take hold economic policy, strong government etc as preferable. Considering that Russia's history is littered with dictatorships this isn't a huge surprise.


    I'm sure that you'll try to tell otherwise but Russia's press is not free. RT is little more than a mouthpiece for the Kremlin & is incredibly biased. Many other Russian news outlets have been closed down or censored, journalists have been threatened or murdered etc.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...piece-by-piece

    According to Freedom House's 2015 report, Russia lies 180 out of 199 nations - behind some rather unpleasant regimes & on par with Saudi Arabia with a score of 83. For comparison, the UK scored 24. A challenger standing against Putin has to overcome significant media bias & obstacles thrown in their path by the Kremlin so their being no notable candidate isn't particularly surprising.

    I recognise that the Russian mindset when it comes to defence is somewhat different than the West's. Both the Russia Federation and the former USSR both have interesting track records in this area - the Soviet Union used the entire of Eastern Europe as a defensive buffer zone. Many in Russia still see Eastern European nations, certainly Belarus, the Ukraine, Georgia, Moldova, Armenia Estonia, Lithuania and Latvia as being very much within the Russian sphere of influence. While I'm sure you'll argue that NATO & the EU should not have expanded that for east, if the elected government of said nation requested to join then why should either of these two organisations turn them down? Maybe Russia should have been a better ally to them & not driven them into the West's arms?
    The Putin administration has made it clear that they class attacks on Russian speakers outside of his nation's borders as a trigger for military action. Russia is not above handing out Russian passports in Eastern Europe, then launching false flag attacks and/or claiming the the nation's government has attacked the speakers/passport holders within its neighbours & then sending in its military, mixed with a health hybrid of mercenaries & local rebels to secure the region. To class this a defensive measure blurs the line considerably.

    The crazy thing is Putin doesn't even deny that Russia is happy to interfere in Eastern Europe.
    Spoiler:
    Show



    To the European Union and the West:*“You finally have to stop trampling over Russia’s interests. Do you not get it? How long are we going to play this game? We thought we made it very clear in Georgia in 2008 that we are prepared to stand up for our interests, take the risks of military intervention. We can suffer sanctions and deal with any political and economic pain you can inflict. We have a higher threshold for pain than you do. Have you forgotten our national narrative and the siege of Leningrad? Do you want to go to war over Ukraine? We don’t, but we’re ready to if*youdon’t back down and back off!”

    To Ukraine and the prospective new leadership in Kyiv: “We’ve warned you and your predecessors repeatedly. What were you expecting when you said you were going to continue with the Association Agreement? We took action against Georgia in 2008 over MAP. We would have taken action against Ukraine too in 2008 if you had kept on pressing like the Georgians, and you know it. Russia is the decisive factor in any major political and economic decision here, not the European Union, not NATO, not the United States, not the West. As you saw with Georgia in 2008, they will not and cannot protect you. Now Crimea is gone. Eastern and southern Ukraine could go too—unless all of you in Kyiv start to take Russia’s interests into consideration first and foremost. We will keep a grip on these territories to make sure this is crystal clear at all times.”

    To Georgia, Moldova, Armenia, and all the other states that used to be part of the Soviet Union: “We hope you’ve really got the message now. If you’re thinking of transitions and new deals with other great powers, like Association Agreements, think of us first. We have plenty of levers we can use against you, and you know what they are. Remember––nothing really belongs to you, not even your own territory or all of your population, and you will always have to pay your tribute to Moscow.” There is a special message embedded in here for the Baltic states: “You may think you have escaped and are safe beyond the EU’s and NATO’s red lines, but can you be sure they can protect you? Remember you still have lots of Russian speakers inside your borders"

    To the Domestic Russian Opposition: Those of you who took to the streets in 2011 and 2011, don’t get any more ideas. If you mobilize outside of scheduled elections and start protesting again, like they just did in Kyiv, we’ll come down on you hard. And it won’t just be the lawbooks we throw at you. Nasty business with those snipers on Maidan … so much for peaceful protests.”

    To the Broader Russian Population: “The Ukrainians just couldn’t get their act together. See what poor governance and then protests bring. They bring complete chaos, loss of life and property, and outside intervention and manipulation; and they push extremists to the top. You have protection at home and abroad. Would you want to trade what you have now for that? If you want to avoid what’s happening in Kyiv, you’d better stick with me, Vladimir Putin, the statist, the survivalist––the man who restored the state and Russia’s great power status after the disasters of the 1990s; the man who has given you 14 years of stability and prosperity!”

    https://www.brookings.edu/articles/m...gs-part-three/


    The majority of things you have typed so far are just statements from the media outlets, its not analytical at all, I am sorry to tell you but it is not how you understand international politics and information war
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    (Original post by Stolyarov Daniel)
    The majority of things you have typed so far are just statements from the media outlets, its not analytical at all, I am sorry to tell you but it is not how you understand international politics and information war
    Thank you for conceding that you are an idiot. Good day to you sir.
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    (Original post by Tempest II)
    The ability of Vladimir Putin to remain in power depends on several factors - one is the backing of the Russian oligarchs, many of them ex-KGB like himself. This has been obtained by ensuring they remain wealthy, appealing to their patriotic spirit and/or, when necessary, threatening them with legal action (as he did with companies when he was the mayor of St Peterburg in the early 1990s. Putin himself is said to be worth somewhere in the region of $2 billion US dollars. As long as he is championing the oligarch's cause then they will back him.
    Two is keeping the Russian people onside. There's no doubt he is popular but it's unclear how doctored that is. There's no doubt that the Russian people like strong leaders so it's easy to understand why Putin ensures he appears this way. Democracy certainly doesn't have the same appeal as it does in the West - Russians seem to take hold economic policy, strong government etc as preferable. Considering that Russia's history is littered with dictatorships this isn't a huge surprise.


    I'm sure that you'll try to tell otherwise but Russia's press is not free. RT is little more than a mouthpiece for the Kremlin & is incredibly biased. Many other Russian news outlets have been closed down or censored, journalists have been threatened or murdered etc.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...piece-by-piece

    According to Freedom House's 2015 report, Russia lies 180 out of 199 nations - behind some rather unpleasant regimes & on par with Saudi Arabia with a score of 83. For comparison, the UK scored 24. A challenger standing against Putin has to overcome significant media bias & obstacles thrown in their path by the Kremlin so their being no notable candidate isn't particularly surprising.

    I recognise that the Russian mindset when it comes to defence is somewhat different than the West's. Both the Russia Federation and the former USSR both have interesting track records in this area - the Soviet Union used the entire of Eastern Europe as a defensive buffer zone. Many in Russia still see Eastern European nations, certainly Belarus, the Ukraine, Georgia, Moldova, Armenia Estonia, Lithuania and Latvia as being very much within the Russian sphere of influence. While I'm sure you'll argue that NATO & the EU should not have expanded that for east, if the elected government of said nation requested to join then why should either of these two organisations turn them down? Maybe Russia should have been a better ally to them & not driven them into the West's arms?
    The Putin administration has made it clear that they class attacks on Russian speakers outside of his nation's borders as a trigger for military action. Russia is not above handing out Russian passports in Eastern Europe, then launching false flag attacks and/or claiming the the nation's government has attacked the speakers/passport holders within its neighbours & then sending in its military, mixed with a health hybrid of mercenaries & local rebels to secure the region. To class this a defensive measure blurs the line considerably.

    The crazy thing is Putin doesn't even deny that Russia is happy to interfere in Eastern Europe.
    Spoiler:
    Show



    To the European Union and the West:*“You finally have to stop trampling over Russia’s interests. Do you not get it? How long are we going to play this game? We thought we made it very clear in Georgia in 2008 that we are prepared to stand up for our interests, take the risks of military intervention. We can suffer sanctions and deal with any political and economic pain you can inflict. We have a higher threshold for pain than you do. Have you forgotten our national narrative and the siege of Leningrad? Do you want to go to war over Ukraine? We don’t, but we’re ready to if*youdon’t back down and back off!”

    To Ukraine and the prospective new leadership in Kyiv: “We’ve warned you and your predecessors repeatedly. What were you expecting when you said you were going to continue with the Association Agreement? We took action against Georgia in 2008 over MAP. We would have taken action against Ukraine too in 2008 if you had kept on pressing like the Georgians, and you know it. Russia is the decisive factor in any major political and economic decision here, not the European Union, not NATO, not the United States, not the West. As you saw with Georgia in 2008, they will not and cannot protect you. Now Crimea is gone. Eastern and southern Ukraine could go too—unless all of you in Kyiv start to take Russia’s interests into consideration first and foremost. We will keep a grip on these territories to make sure this is crystal clear at all times.”

    To Georgia, Moldova, Armenia, and all the other states that used to be part of the Soviet Union: “We hope you’ve really got the message now. If you’re thinking of transitions and new deals with other great powers, like Association Agreements, think of us first. We have plenty of levers we can use against you, and you know what they are. Remember––nothing really belongs to you, not even your own territory or all of your population, and you will always have to pay your tribute to Moscow.” There is a special message embedded in here for the Baltic states: “You may think you have escaped and are safe beyond the EU’s and NATO’s red lines, but can you be sure they can protect you? Remember you still have lots of Russian speakers inside your borders"

    To the Domestic Russian Opposition: Those of you who took to the streets in 2011 and 2011, don’t get any more ideas. If you mobilize outside of scheduled elections and start protesting again, like they just did in Kyiv, we’ll come down on you hard. And it won’t just be the lawbooks we throw at you. Nasty business with those snipers on Maidan … so much for peaceful protests.”

    To the Broader Russian Population: “The Ukrainians just couldn’t get their act together. See what poor governance and then protests bring. They bring complete chaos, loss of life and property, and outside intervention and manipulation; and they push extremists to the top. You have protection at home and abroad. Would you want to trade what you have now for that? If you want to avoid what’s happening in Kyiv, you’d better stick with me, Vladimir Putin, the statist, the survivalist––the man who restored the state and Russia’s great power status after the disasters of the 1990s; the man who has given you 14 years of stability and prosperity!”

    https://www.brookings.edu/articles/m...gs-part-three/


    The height of corruption occurred during Yeltsin's reign and there is no ex-KGB friends oligarchs in his surroundings.

    Those quotes are fake as hell , makes me sad how zombie the western nations are....
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    (Original post by Tempest II)
    Thank you for conceding that you are an idiot. Good day to you sir.
    Do you have a degree?
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    'invincible nuclear weapons' . Probably as invincible as this vehicle
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    Very reliable as well...
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    (Original post by martis_ltu)
    Very reliable as well...
    your hatred against Russia clearly deludes you and makes your brain biased as ****. This is what america wants, tension between neighbours of Russia with Russians
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    (Original post by Stolyarov Daniel)
    your hatred against Russia clearly deludes you and makes your brain biased as ****. This is what america wants, tension between neighbours of Russia with Russians
    I don't hate Russia, in fact, I interact with Russians everyday, as most of my neighbours are Russian. I just don't agree with their government. Me joking about a little about their weapons does not mean I want tensions to increase. I want for relations to get better, and Russia could potentially be a great economic partner. However, with the current policy of their government, that is nearly impossible.
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    (Original post by Tempest II)
    Democracy certainly doesn't have the same appeal as it does in the West - Russians seem to take hold economic policy, strong government etc as preferable. Considering that Russia's history is littered with dictatorships this isn't a huge surprise.
    Russians also vividly remember the 90s when democracy - albeit rigged in favour of Yeltsin - in tandem with vulture free-market capitalism brought the newly-formed Russian Federation to its knees, which explains their support and preference for a benevolent authoritarian.

    I'm sure that you'll try to tell otherwise but Russia's press is not free. RT is little more than a mouthpiece for the Kremlin & is incredibly biased.
    RT is nothing more than the Russian equivalent of the BBC, however, and correct me if I am wrong, but I have a difficult time believing that you lambaste the BBC as an 'incredibly biased mouthpiece for Downing Street'.

    I recognise that the Russian mindset when it comes to defence is somewhat different than the West's. Both the Russia Federation and the former USSR both have interesting track records in this area - the Soviet Union used the entire of Eastern Europe as a defensive buffer zone. Many in Russia still see Eastern European nations, certainly Belarus, the Ukraine, Georgia, Moldova, Armenia Estonia, Lithuania and Latvia as being very much within the Russian sphere of influence. While I'm sure you'll argue that NATO & the EU should not have expanded that for east, if the elected government of said nation requested to join then why should either of these two organisations turn them down?
    Because whether the West likes it or not, Russia remains a great power - and like all great powers, it has a sphere of influence, which it will go to great lengths to defend and/or expand. This is part of the tragedy of great power politics, to paraphrase Mearsheimer.

    The Baltic states and the various post-coup governments of Ukraine may demand NATO membership, however, not only is it incredibly foolish and naive to believe that a great power - Russia - will simply accept that its rival - the U.S. - will extend, effectively what is its border, up to the Russian border, but it is extremely dangerous to provoke a great power in such a way.

    Let me remind you of how the U.S. reacted when it discovered that the Soviets had placed nuclear weapons in Cuba.

    Maybe Russia should have been a better ally to them & not driven them into the West's arms?
    The 'Russia' you are referring to was never an ally to these countries - the Soviet Union was. If you know anything about the Soviet Union you will know that it was never Russian, nor did it benefit the people of Russia. In fact, the people that suffered the most under Soviet rule were, overwhelmingly, Russians.

    I'm sure you're aware of what occurred behind the Iron Curtain, and therefore it is hardly surprising that almost every former Warsaw Pact member state has joined NATO in order to ensure that such an ordeal never happens again.

    The Putin administration has made it clear that they class attacks on Russian speakers outside of his nation's borders as a trigger for military action.
    You would understand this if you knew that tens of millions of ethnic Russians found themselves in newly-independent countries instead of the Russian Federation after the breakup of the Soviet Union.

    Russia is not above handing out Russian passports in Eastern Europe, then launching false flag attacks and/or claiming the the nation's government has attacked the speakers/passport holders within its neighbours & then sending in its military, mixed with a health hybrid of mercenaries & local rebels to secure the region. To class this a defensive measure blurs the line considerably.

    The crazy thing is Putin doesn't even deny that Russia is happy to interfere in Eastern Europe.
    Spoiler:
    Show





    To the European Union and the West:*“You finally have to stop trampling over Russia’s interests. Do you not get it? How long are we going to play this game? We thought we made it very clear in Georgia in 2008 that we are prepared to stand up for our interests, take the risks of military intervention. We can suffer sanctions and deal with any political and economic pain you can inflict. We have a higher threshold for pain than you do. Have you forgotten our national narrative and the siege of Leningrad? Do you want to go to war over Ukraine? We don’t, but we’re ready to if*youdon’t back down and back off!”

    To Ukraine and the prospective new leadership in Kyiv: “We’ve warned you and your predecessors repeatedly. What were you expecting when you said you were going to continue with the Association Agreement? We took action against Georgia in 2008 over MAP. We would have taken action against Ukraine too in 2008 if you had kept on pressing like the Georgians, and you know it. Russia is the decisive factor in any major political and economic decision here, not the European Union, not NATO, not the United States, not the West. As you saw with Georgia in 2008, they will not and cannot protect you. Now Crimea is gone. Eastern and southern Ukraine could go too—unless all of you in Kyiv start to take Russia’s interests into consideration first and foremost. We will keep a grip on these territories to make sure this is crystal clear at all times.”

    To Georgia, Moldova, Armenia, and all the other states that used to be part of the Soviet Union: “We hope you’ve really got the message now. If you’re thinking of transitions and new deals with other great powers, like Association Agreements, think of us first. We have plenty of levers we can use against you, and you know what they are. Remember––nothing really belongs to you, not even your own territory or all of your population, and you will always have to pay your tribute to Moscow.” There is a special message embedded in here for the Baltic states: “You may think you have escaped and are safe beyond the EU’s and NATO’s red lines, but can you be sure they can protect you? Remember you still have lots of Russian speakers inside your borders"

    To the Domestic Russian Opposition: Those of you who took to the streets in 2011 and 2011, don’t get any more ideas. If you mobilize outside of scheduled elections and start protesting again, like they just did in Kyiv, we’ll come down on you hard. And it won’t just be the lawbooks we throw at you. Nasty business with those snipers on Maidan … so much for peaceful protests.”

    To the Broader Russian Population: “The Ukrainians just couldn’t get their act together. See what poor governance and then protests bring. They bring complete chaos, loss of life and property, and outside intervention and manipulation; and they push extremists to the top. You have protection at home and abroad. Would you want to trade what you have now for that? If you want to avoid what’s happening in Kyiv, you’d better stick with me, Vladimir Putin, the statist, the survivalist––the man who restored the state and Russia’s great power status after the disasters of the 1990s; the man who has given you 14 years of stability and prosperity!”

    https://www.brookings.edu/articles/m...gs-part-three/




    These are the actions of a great power.

    There is a reason why the U.S. does not provoke China over its actions in the South China Sea, let alone in its western provinces, because it understands full-well that China is a great power - and, arguably, a superpower (if we use metrics other than the outdated projection of force around the world in less than 48 hours).

    The sooner the West realises that Russia is not a former great power like Germany, France and the UK, the sooner it will realise that it must treat it with respect, and the sooner these dangerous situations can be averted.
 
 
 
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