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    Hi, does anybody know why he frequency of waves in the deep and shallow regions is the same?

    Thank-you
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    Are you thinking about water surface waves in a pond or similar.?

    The situation there would be that as the waves neared the shallow edge of the pond the speed would reduce... so the wavelength gets shorter (and the c=fλ relationship is preserved)

    That's the way waves work - if you put in waves at (say) 5Hz you get out waves at 5Hz... the time passing between one peak and the next stays the same... and if that didn't happen you'd get some odd effects.

    you could think about continually vibrating a point in the middle of the pond at 5hz - if you're putting 5 waves in per second and getting a different number per second at the side of the pond - you've either lost some waves or got some extra ones from somewhere... just by changing the speed they're moving at.

    probably better to think about waves peaks as a line of cars going down the motorway and having to keep a *constant time* between themselves and the car in front... if they speed up the distance gets greater and if they slow down the distance gets shorter.
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    (Original post by Joinedup)
    Are you thinking about water surface waves in a pond or similar.?

    The situation there would be that as the waves neared the shallow edge of the pond the speed would reduce... so the wavelength gets shorter (and the c=fλ relationship is preserved)

    That's the way waves work - if you put in waves at (say) 5Hz you get out waves at 5Hz... the time passing between one peak and the next stays the same... and if that didn't happen you'd get some odd effects.

    you could think about continually vibrating a point in the middle of the pond at 5hz - if you're putting 5 waves in per second and getting a different number per second at the side of the pond - you've either lost some waves or got some extra ones from somewhere... just by changing the speed they're moving at.

    probably better to think about waves peaks as a line of cars going down the motorway and having to keep a *constant time* between themselves and the car in front... if they speed up the distance gets greater and if they slow down the distance gets shorter.
    Wow! Thank-you so much, that’s really helpful
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