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Driving in the snow? watch

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    Does anyone actually enjoy driving in the snow? I like learning how to correct slides etc by deliberately using the handbrake and tipping the weight of the car around slighty (on a completely empty straight backroad of course) to test my ability. One thing the driving test doesn't teach you, is how to 1. drive in the snow and 2. how to correct slides in general.

    Driving in the snow isn't hard at all, but the news makes it out to be, since people are impatient, heavy footed, have close following distances etc... which all add up to more accidents.

    I can't wait to go out tomorrow and have a slide about (within my limits ofc). Am I insane?
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    Nah you just enjoy watching pedestrians suffer and recording them fall and break every bone in their body. You get pleasure watching them from your cosy car with heating listening to Morgan Freeman narrating and drinking a nice hot chocolate with exrea EXTRA cream.
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    (Original post by Jheinexx)
    Nah you just enjoy watching pedestrians suffer and recording them fall and break every bone in their body. You get pleasure watching them from your cosy car with heating listening to Morgan Freeman narrating and drinking a nice hot chocolate with exrea EXTRA cream.
    I live in the middle of nowhere with barely any pedestrians. If I wanted to watch falling compilations I'd just go to youtube or facebook.
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    The best rookie practice, car skids even at low speeds and reacts slowly.

    However pulling up a handbrake will hardly let get a touch of all things that can happen to a car.
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    (Original post by Xopher_)
    Does anyone actually enjoy driving in the snow? I like learning how to correct slides etc by deliberately using the handbrake and tipping the weight of the car around slighty (on a completely empty straight backroad of course) to test my ability. One thing the driving test doesn't teach you, is how to 1. drive in the snow and 2. how to correct slides in general.

    Driving in the snow isn't hard at all, but the news makes it out to be, since people are impatient, heavy footed, have close following distances etc... which all add up to more accidents.

    I can't wait to go out tomorrow and have a slide about (within my limits ofc). Am I insane?
    I agree that people should be taught a bit more about driving in the snow during lessons. Of course it couldnt be part of the test, but people should be taught something in lessons.
    I totally disagree about how to correct slides in general though.
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    (Original post by Emma:-))
    I totally disagree about how to correct slides in general though.
    There are countries where you have to pass skid correction exercises and time driving on a snowy track.

    After training in the snow you don't stand much chance to correct skids on dry tarmac, because car reacts in much quicker and brutal manner, as well as this happens at much higher speeds on tarmac, but it teaches some respect to the danger. Also may come in handy on rain, sometimes people crash on rain unnecessarily, if there is some dirt on the road, a car is likely to behave similarly to the snowy conditions.
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    Nah, feels like I can't properly enjoy driving since I'm bricking it too much.
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    please please do NOT drive in this weather unless it is really essential. life changing injuries to you or other people are not amusing or edgy.
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    I enjoy driving in the snow to be honest. I've fortunately had experience driving in pretty bad conditions in the alps, and so compared to what we've just faced, is a lot harder... I think if everyone just had a bit more of an awareness of how to control their car in ice/snow, they'd do a lot better.
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    I will deffo enjoy driving RWDs in the snow
    inb4 gets stuck in snow and have to shovel myself out :rofl:
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    I enjoy being a passenger in the car when it snows because it's so pretty to look at but I doubt I'd enjoy driving in such dangerous conditions.
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    (Original post by the bear)
    please please do NOT drive in this weather unless it is really essential. life changing injuries to you or other people are not amusing or edgy.
    I totally disagree. On snow and ice it's relatively easy to crash, but chances of causing a serious injury are the lowest possible, because if anything happens it will at very low speeds and of all emergency situations, on snow car is easiest in control because it reacts very slowly and gently, and you can't drive it fast anyway.

    Rally drivers always recommend starting lessons of car control on snow.

    Black ice is dangerous, but mainly when you meet it when there is no snow and you're driving too fast because conditions appear to be good.


    (Original post by JustACoincidence)
    I enjoy being a passenger in the car when it snows because it's so pretty to look at but I doubt I'd enjoy driving in such dangerous conditions.
    It's not dangerous. It's a bit difficult most of the time, but doesn't cause any serious danger, unlike fast, confident driving in the summer.
    Dry tarmac in the summer is, because if a car loses grip then, most likely it will happen at speed so high that your chances of survival are next to none, and because of speed and high grip, a car will be practically uncontrollable.
    On a road covered with snow, a very good driver in a car with winter tires can go 30 mph, or 50 mph if the road is wide and absolutely empty at tops- chances of getting killed at such speeds are next to zero, you won't even have an injury.

    But people who did not spend whole day training on a frozen lake, are not likely to go faster than 12mph- at such speed the worst that can happen is light damage of a wheel.

    The problem starts when you've got a downhill road covered with partly molten snow, or ice, or at worst you have summer tires.

    It is urgent on snow or ice to have winter tires and visualise towards which directions pendulum can push your car at particular corner attack angles, etc.
    Also engine braking is crucial, especially on the downhill. Engine braking on low rpm's is the only way to somehow slow down on ice.
    But still, you can't drive dangerous speeds on snow anyway.
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    (Original post by PTMalewski)
    I totally disagree. On snow and ice it's relatively easy to crash, but chances of causing a serious injury are the lowest possible, because if anything happens it will at very low speeds and of all emergency situations, on snow car is easiest in control because it reacts very slowly and gently, and you can't drive it fast anyway.

    Rally drivers always recommend starting lessons of car control on snow.

    Black ice is dangerous, but mainly when you meet it when there is no snow and you're driving too fast because conditions appear to be good.




    It's not dangerous. It's a bit difficult most of the time, but doesn't cause any serious danger, unlike fast, confident driving in the summer.
    Dry tarmac in the summer is, because if a car loses grip then, most likely it will happen at speed so high that your chances of survival are next to none, and because of speed and high grip, a car will be practically uncontrollable.
    On a road covered with snow, a very good driver in a car with winter tires can go 30 mph, or 50 mph if the road is wide and absolutely empty at tops- chances of getting killed at such speeds are next to zero, you won't even have an injury.

    But people who did not spend whole day training on a frozen lake, are not likely to go faster than 12mph- at such speed the worst that can happen is light damage of a wheel.

    The problem starts when you've got a downhill road covered with partly molten snow, or ice, or at worst you have summer tires.

    It is urgent on snow or ice to have winter tires and visualise towards which directions pendulum can push your car at particular corner attack angles, etc.
    Also engine braking is crucial, especially on the downhill. Engine braking on low rpm's is the only way to somehow slow down on ice.
    But still, you can't drive dangerous speeds on snow anyway.
    this is bad advice. you can kill or maim at any speed in a car. encouraging people to drive in the snow is ridiculous.
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    (Original post by the bear)
    this is bad advice. you can kill or maim at any speed in a car. encouraging people to drive in the snow is ridiculous.

    You can also kill anyone with a bread-knife, but such event is unlikely even if you actually attacked someone with that knife, while any sane person will try not to harm anyone with a car.
    Maybe for you, this is ridiculous, because you've never driven on snow, or you didn't pay the slightest attention to learn on what you're doing, then you had no idea what to do with difficulties of accelerating, braking or turning or snow. I personally believe that if someone can't drive on snow, such person should not be allowed to drive at all, because snow is a surface on which the car is EASIEST to control, because all there is that may ever happen, you will experience at very low speeds, and due to low grip, a car will present the most gentle reactions ever possible, while on dry tarmac in emergency it will kill you before you even notice.

    A car on snow does all sorts of skidding at lowest speeds and it is easiest to control them firstly because of low speed, secondly because low grip means it loses and gets it back gently.
    I know this because of this is my 10th winter behind the wheel, I've learned as much about driving as I could from books, then tried and tested all sorts of manoeuvres on dedicated training.
    I always take an opportunity of first snow for training.
    On some closed parking or road, as at least one of rally champions recommends in his book on safe driving, I try braking, and turning at varous different lines and angles, faster and faster to learn what grip do I have, how the car will react and get feeling necessary to control it,it gives better idea what to expect and may come in handy also in rain. On tarmac maybe not, because challenge is too difficult anyway, but at least it gives an idea what to avoid and where to seek danger.
    I'm also still using a car that doesn't even have ABS and I don't feel any need for it. Haven't had a crash in winter for 9 years. On snowy road I feel perfectly safe, even if other drivers are not so well prepared, they drive very slowly so they can't harm me, at worst they will damage my car.

    While on dry tarmac they take risks, do speeding, and I know that in case of emergency, they wouldn't be able to take control of the situation - I know I probably wouldn't - once grip on tarmac is overwhelmed, a perfect speed and precision is required, speed and precision much farther beyond regular driving skills, than controlling a car on snow.

    If I were to expect a fatal accident, I would say it will take place on a warm sunny day. In many countries, this is actually statistically true, that most of the fatal accidents take place in excellent conditions.

    Of course, I presume that nobody is stupid enough to see snow, and think he or she can drive on it as fast as on tarmac. Such person should have their license taken away instantly as lack of imagination may prove deadly in any conditions.
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    (Original post by PTMalewski)
    .


    You can also kill anyone with a bread-knife, but such event is unlikely even if you actually attacked someone with that knife, while any sane person will try not to harm anyone with a car.
    Maybe for you, this is ridiculous, because you've never driven on snow, or you didn't pay the slightest attention to learn on what you're doing, then you had no idea what to do with difficulties of accelerating, braking or turning or snow. I personally believe that if someone can't drive on snow, such person should not be allowed to drive at all, because snow is a surface on which the car is EASIEST to control, because all there is that may ever happen, you will experience at very low speeds, and due to low grip, a car will present the most gentle reactions ever possible, while on dry tarmac in emergency it will kill you before you even notice.

    A car on snow does all sorts of skidding at lowest speeds and it is easiest to control them firstly because of low speed, secondly because low grip means it loses and gets it back gently.
    I know this because of this is my 10th winter behind the wheel, I've learned as much about driving as I could from books, then tried and tested all sorts of manoeuvres on dedicated training.
    I always take an opportunity of first snow for training.
    On some closed parking or road, as at least one of rally champions recommends in his book on safe driving, I try braking, and turning at varous different lines and angles, faster and faster to learn what grip do I have, how the car will react and get feeling necessary to control it,it gives better idea what to expect and may come in handy also in rain. On tarmac maybe not, because challenge is too difficult anyway, but at least it gives an idea what to avoid and where to seek danger.
    I'm also still using a car that doesn't even have ABS and I don't feel any need for it. Haven't had a crash in winter for 9 years. On snowy road I feel perfectly safe, even if other drivers are not so well prepared, they drive very slowly so they can't harm me, at worst they will damage my car.

    While on dry tarmac they take risks, do speeding, and I know that in case of emergency, they wouldn't be able to take control of the situation - I know I probably wouldn't - once grip on tarmac is overwhelmed, a perfect speed and precision is required, speed and precision much farther beyond regular driving skills, than controlling a car on snow.

    If I were to expect a fatal accident, I would say it will take place on a warm sunny day. In many countries, this is actually statistically true, that most of the fatal accidents take place in excellent conditions.

    Of course, I presume that nobody is stupid enough to see snow, and think he or she can drive on it as fast as on tarmac. Such person should have their license taken away instantly as lack of imagination may prove deadly in any conditions.
    it is highly irresponsible to encourage young first-time drivers to venture out in the worst winter conditions for decades on your say-so.

    smh
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    It’s not worth learning snow driving in the U.K for the driving test. Yes it snowed this week, but it may not now snow for another 5 years. It’s worth it in Sweden, Canada etc. Skid correction though should be taught.
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    (Original post by the bear)
    it is highly irresponsible to encourage young first-time drivers to venture out in the worst winter conditions for decades on your say-so.

    smh
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    (Original post by the bear)
    it is highly irresponsible to encourage young first-time drivers to venture out in the worst winter conditions for decades on your say-so.

    smh
    What if they lived in Scandinavia or eastern Europe?
    Not all nations suffer from irrational fear of snow. Snow is the best training condition. I didn't invent that, I just repeat after one of rally champions. I passed my own driving test in a middle of snowy winter. It teaches feeling, control and respect.

    Once again, there is much greater chance that they kill themselves in summer as a result of oil spill, tire failure or side wind blow, rather than in winter driving 12 mph. Of course, any attempt of driving any car in any conditions should start from reading a book written by someone like the Stig. After that, there are plenty of racing tracks across the UK, I'm sure it's possible to find some place that organizes some track days. If you ever perform a succesful save, it will be thanks to the winter and such training.
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    (Original post by PTMalewski)
    What if they lived in Scandinavia or eastern Europe?
    Not all nations suffer from irrational fear of snow. Snow is the best training condition. I didn't invent that, I just repeat after one of rally champions. I passed my own driving test in a middle of snowy winter. It teaches feeling, control and respect.

    Once again, there is much greater chance that they kill themselves in summer as a result of oil spill, tire failure or side wind blow, rather than in winter driving 12 mph. Of course, any attempt of driving any car in any conditions should start from reading a book written by someone like the Stig. After that, there are plenty of racing tracks across the UK, I'm sure it's possible to find some place that organizes some track days. If you ever perform a succesful save, it will be thanks to the winter and such training.
    no doubt you think we should practice walking on icy pavements to improve our ambulatory skills

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    (Original post by PTMalewski)
    What if they lived in Scandinavia or eastern Europe?
    Not all nations suffer from irrational fear of snow. Snow is the best training condition. I didn't invent that, I just repeat after one of rally champions. I passed my own driving test in a middle of snowy winter. It teaches feeling, control and respect.

    Once again, there is much greater chance that they kill themselves in summer as a result of oil spill, tire failure or side wind blow, rather than in winter driving 12 mph. Of course, any attempt of driving any car in any conditions should start from reading a book written by someone like the Stig. After that, there are plenty of racing tracks across the UK, I'm sure it's possible to find some place that organizes some track days. If you ever perform a succesful save, it will be thanks to the winter and such training.
    In each driving test for each country I suspect the tests will be tailored to that country. Ie snow driving will play a part in Sweden/Russia/Canada, because it is incredibly likely to be relevent. This is not the case in the uk.
 
 
 
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