What is preferable A levels or Foundation Year?

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Muhammad Tayyab
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Hiya, I just wanted to what really is "Foundation Year." Many of my relatives suggest me to do foundation year instead of a levels as its of only 1 year while a levels is of 2 so it's going to save my year. I really dont whether it's true or not so I want your answers for that ^~^ And also Im doing O levels right now what's your opinion what should I opt for A levels or Foundation year?
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FloralHybrid
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(Original post by Muhammad Tayyab)
Hiya, I just wanted to what really is "Foundation Year." Many of my relatives suggest me to do foundation year instead of a levels as its of only 1 year while a levels is of 2 so it's going to save my year. I really dont whether it's true or not so I want your answers for that ^~^ And also Im doing O levels right now what's your opinion what should I opt for A levels or Foundation year?
A foundation year isn't really meant to be as a substitute for a levels, unless you're a mature student. If you are a mature student (not currently 16 - Sorry, I can't see what forum this is posted in) then it's worth considering, if you can find a foundation year course that enables you to pick the degree you want to do. If not, then doing A-Levels will open more doors. Depends entirely on what your plan is.
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Muhammad Tayyab
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(Original post by FloralHybrid)
A foundation year isn't really meant to be as a substitute for a levels, unless you're a mature student. If you are a mature student (not currently 16 - Sorry, I can't see what forum this is posted in) then it's worth considering, if you can find a foundation year course that enables you to pick the degree you want to do. If not, then doing A-Levels will open more doors. Depends entirely on what your plan is.
So you mean foundation year isn't that beneficial?
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artful_lounger
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If you are a UK student under the age of 19, who has not yet achieved a level 3 qualification (such as A-levels) you will normally not be able to pursue a foundation year at a university - you are expected to possess some level 3 qualification, by which they can assess your application and determine if they will take you on the foundation year. Foundation years for UK students are designed primarily for students who took the "wrong" subjects in 6th form and need to "retrain" before moving onto a degree requiring specific prerequisites - normally STEM courses.

If you are a UK student over the age of 21 (i.e. a mature student) you may be considered for a foundation year without a recent (or any) level 3 qualification or an Access to HE course. You may wish to consider an Access to HE course in this case as well, depending on what you intend to pursue at degree level - for non-STEM subjects, an Access course would be the normal route, as humanities/social science foundation years are normally not available for UK students.

If you are an international student, depending on your qualifications, an international foundation year (such as INTO) may be appropriate. These are normally available for a wide variety of subjects, and may include material similar to A-level in specific subjects (for example for prospective STEM students) or more general academic skills and varied subjects (for humanities and social sciences).

If you are unsure I would recommend contacting any universities you may be considering applying to before applying, and explaining your specific circumstances and academic background to them so they can advise what would be the most appropriate route for you.
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Muhammad Tayyab
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
If you are a UK student under the age of 19, who has not yet achieved a level 3 qualification (such as A-levels) you will normally not be able to pursue a foundation year at a university - you are expected to possess some level 3 qualification, by which they can assess your application and determine if they will take you on the foundation year. Foundation years for UK students are designed primarily for students who took the "wrong" subjects in 6th form and need to "retrain" before moving onto a degree requiring specific prerequisites - normally STEM courses.

If you are a UK student over the age of 21 (i.e. a mature student) you may be considered for a foundation year without a recent (or any) level 3 qualification or an Access to HE course. You may wish to consider an Access to HE course in this case as well, depending on what you intend to pursue at degree level - for non-STEM subjects, an Access course would be the normal route, as humanities/social science foundation years are normally not available for UK students.

If you are an international student, depending on your qualifications, an international foundation year (such as INTO) may be appropriate. These are normally available for a wide variety of subjects, and may include material similar to A-level in specific subjects (for example for prospective STEM students) or more general academic skills and varied subjects (for humanities and social sciences).

If you are unsure I would recommend contacting any universities you may be considering applying to before applying, and explaining your specific circumstances and academic background to them so they can advise what would be the most appropriate route for you.
Hmm I see I was just confuse because right now Im doing o levels and its my final year and in May I'll give the paper of all major sciences so I was just worried what to do after o levels and Im doing o levels from Pakistan
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Muhammad Tayyab)
Hmm I see I was just confuse because right now Im doing o levels and its my final year and in May I'll give the paper of all major sciences so I was just worried what to do after o levels and Im doing o levels from Pakistan
O-Levels will be the same "level" as GCSE/IGCSE, which won't be adequate preparation for degree level study in the UK. You should look into International Foundation Years, or seeing if you can take A-levels or the International Baccalaureate Diploma (CIE offers international A-levels, although any exam board offering them should be acceptable).
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Muhammad Tayyab
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
O-Levels will be the same "level" as GCSE/IGCSE, which won't be adequate preparation for degree level study in the UK. You should look into International Foundation Years, or seeing if you can take A-levels or the oInternational Baccalaureate Diploma (CIE offers international A-levels, although any exam board offering them should be acceptable).
Umm I've most of it what you said but one last question from my side XD
If I do A levels from Pakistan rather than UK will this effect me later in Universities admission? Will the universities have any sort of objection for why I did A levels from Pakistan and not from UK? Or won't they accept my admission😲
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Muhammad Tayyab)
Umm I've most of it what you said but one last question from my side XD
If I do A levels from Pakistan rather than UK will this effect me later in Universities admission? Will the universities have any sort of objection for why I did A levels from Pakistan and not from UK? Or won't they accept my admission😲
It won't matter, provided they are recognised A-levels (e.g. any of the UK boards or CIE, the latter being the most likely case). Note that some degree subjects will require you to have studied certain subjects at A-level - for example Engineering courses normally require Physics and Maths, Medicine almost always requires Chemistry and often requires Biology, etc. You should look at the admissions pages for the relevant universities/courses you're interested in to make sure. Most subjects outside of the sciences have fewer if any requirements though (the usually exceptions being History, English Literature, and language courses, requiring the same subject, and Economics/Business/Finance and similar courses normally requiring Maths).
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Mtayyab21
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
It won't matter, provided they are recognised A-levels (e.g. any of the UK boards or CIE, the latter being the most likely case). Note that some degree subjects will require you to have studied certain subjects at A-level - for example Engineering courses normally require Physics and Maths, Medicine almost always requires Chemistry and often requires Biology, etc. You should look at the admissions pages for the relevant universities/courses you're interested in to make sure. Most subjects outside of the sciences have fewer if any requirements though (the usually exceptions being History, English Literature, and language courses, requiring the same subject, and Economics/Business/Finance and similar courses normally requiring Maths).
So doing A levels from Pakistan would be better as the fee structure here is cheaper than UK. 3 times cheaper I guess.
Do UK colleges of A levels provide scholarships to?
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Mtayyab21)
So doing A levels from Pakistan would be better as the fee structure here is cheaper than UK. 3 times cheaper I guess.
Do UK colleges of A levels provide scholarships to?
For UK students under the age of 19 it is free if you go to a state funded school (and required, for that matter, to do some qualification at this level) - I have no idea how this applies to international students in the UK though. I believe several private schools do offer some scholarships, although these are comeptitive in nature and may have limitations depending on residency/nationality potentially.

If studying your further education (qualifications like A-levels) in the UK is of interest, you may wish to spend some time researching that. "Further education" provision is separate to "higher education" (i.e. degree level), and it's regulated and arranged by different branches of the government, so fee structures and requirements regarding e.g. visas and nationality status will likely be very different. I have no expertise in that matter unfortunately though - I can make suggestions as to subject choices or discuss the merits of A-level vs IB, but I don't know anything about fees, funding, and potential visa requirements for further education (I don't actually know anything about visa requirements for higher education, either, just fees and funding, as I had permanent residency by the time I was applying to university).

Ultimately however it shouldn't make a difference whether you complete your further education (A-levels) in the UK or abroad, as long as you do the exams etc. You may need to take English Language tests such as the TOEFL/IELTS if you do not complete your schooling in the UK however.
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Mtayyab21
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
For UK students under the age of 19 it is free if you go to a state funded school (and required, for that matter, to do some qualification at this level) - I have no idea how this applies to international students in the UK though. I believe several private schools do offer some scholarships, although these are comeptitive in nature and may have limitations depending on residency/nationality potentially.

If studying your further education (qualifications like A-levels) in the UK is of interest, you may wish to spend some time researching that. "Further education" provision is separate to "higher education" (i.e. degree level), and it's regulated and arranged by different branches of the government, so fee structures and requirements regarding e.g. visas and nationality status will likely be very different. I have no expertise in that matter unfortunately though - I can make suggestions as to subject choices or discuss the merits of A-level vs IB, but I don't know anything about fees, funding, and potential visa requirements for further education (I don't actually know anything about visa requirements for higher education, either, just fees and funding, as I had permanent residency by the time I was applying to university).

Ultimately however it shouldn't make a difference whether you complete your further education (A-levels) in the UK or abroad, as long as you do the exams etc. You may need to take English Language tests such as the TOEFL/IELTS if you do not complete your schooling in the UK however.
I see... but why do I require IELTS/TOEFL if I want to do A levels from UK? I've heard from many people that O level students do not require IELTS for studying in UK and thus have any advantage. I've Korean nationality though.
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Mtayyab21
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(Original post by Mtayyab21)
I see... but why do I require IELTS/TOEFL if I want to do A levels from UK? I've heard from many people that O level students do not require IELTS for studying in UK and thus have any advantage. I've Korean nationality though.
What's your age and are you an Uni student or do some job? BTW I know that its a personal question but you can deny to answer it.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Mtayyab21)
I see... but why do I require IELTS/TOEFL if I want to do A levels from UK? I've heard from many people that O level students do not require IELTS for studying in UK and thus have any advantage. I've Korean nationality though.
Sorry, my phrasing was unclear - the IELTS/TOEFL would normally be required when applying to universities for the degree, if you do your A-levels outside of the UK.

(Original post by Mtayyab21)
What's your age and are you an Uni student or do some job? BTW I know that its a personal question but you can deny to answer it.
I'm 25, I was in uni for a while studying engineering and now I'm not
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Mtayyab21
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[QUOTE=artful_lounger;76400084]Sorry, my phrasing was unclear - the IELTS/TOEFL would normally be required when applying to universities for the degree, if you do your A-levels outside of the UK.

What!? That means I still require IELTS/TOEFL after completing my A levels for Uni?
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nikihajxxx
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(Original post by FloralHybrid)
A foundation year isn't really meant to be as a substitute for a levels, unless you're a mature student. If you are a mature student (not currently 16 - Sorry, I can't see what forum this is posted in) then it's worth considering, if you can find a foundation year course that enables you to pick the degree you want to do. If not, then doing A-Levels will open more doors. Depends entirely on what your plan is.
Do u know any universities that accept international students for foundation course with gcses since im a mature student.
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