There is no real need for women to work Watch

AgeOfTheBimbo
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Certainly not beyond the parish level or the community/neighbourhood level. Its a family's duty to protect them as minors, so that immediately rules out pre-18 employment. When they are at uni they should be 100% committed to education so there is no mandate for it there either and when they graduate that is the time they should be married/preparing for motherhood, upon which it is the duty of the inlaws family to take care of her/her childrens welfare in exchange for looking after their home.

Allowing a daughter/wife to enter the cut and thrust of industry is imo absolutely savage and at most they should do no more than baking or sewing in a church hall in addition to their household duties. The consequences of male unemployment are far more devastating for society but the status quo with women drinking, travelling, working has led to nothing but destruction of our communities. Reverting to the pre 60s society is essential if you are to tackle the epidemics of divorce, alcoholism, homelessness, teen pregnancy and unemployment. But then those societies that advocate this sort of tribal society (Libya, Syria) always get taken out by the system.
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TCA2b
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I mean automation in and of itself will probably render a single earner household more viable, depressing costs and increasing the earnings a single earner can make in less time.

I doubt many women want to be working full time when they could be spending that time raising their kids, especially during their formative years. Would they want to enter the workforce if they did not feel they had to for financial reasons? I’m sure some would, but the majority? If I were a woman I don’t think I’d see the appeal since there’s more to life than some empty career.
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AgeOfTheBimbo
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(Original post by TCA2b)
I mean automation in and of itself will probably render a single earner household more viable, depressing costs and increasing the earnings a single earner can make in less time.

I doubt many women want to be working full time when they could be spending that time raising their kids, especially during their formative years. Would they want to enter the workforce if they did not feel they had to for financial reasons? I’m sure some would, but the majority? If I were a woman I don’t think I’d see the appeal since there’s more to life than some empty career.
....and it would solve all the issues they have with harassment aswell.
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SMEGGGY
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You a fundamentalist?

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ed98
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Damn. I’ve never considered myself a feminist but you guys may make me reconsider,

I can’t believe the only value you see in your mother, sister, girlfriend etc., is to pop out babies.
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TCA2b
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(Original post by AgeOfTheBimbo)
....and it would solve all the issues they have with harassment aswell.
Well what I’m getting at is that automation will change the economic fundamentals significantly, so take away that pressure to get a job for both parents and it will be interesting to see how many women still see the work force as appealing, particularly on a full time basis.
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justanotherchica
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(Original post by AgeOfTheBimbo)
Certainly not beyond the parish level or the community/neighbourhood level. Its a family's duty to protect them as minors, so that immediately rules out pre-18 employment. When they are at uni they should be 100% committed to education so there is no mandate for it there either and when they graduate that is the time they should be married/preparing for motherhood, upon which it is the duty of the inlaws family to take care of her/her childrens welfare in exchange for looking after their home.

Allowing a daughter/wife to enter the cut and thrust of industry is imo absolutely savage and at most they should do no more than baking or sewing in a church hall in addition to their household duties. The consequences of male unemployment are far more devastating for society but the status quo with women drinking, travelling, working has led to nothing but destruction of our communities. Reverting to the pre 60s society is essential if you are to tackle the epidemics of divorce, alcoholism, homelessness, teen pregnancy and unemployment. But then those societies that advocate this sort of tribal society (Libya, Syria) always get taken out by the system.

im 17 and I work because my mum can hardly afford to buy me shoes. good point but I wouldn't be very happy to walk through snow in ballerina shoes, thank god i can afford to buy proper shoes. and who the **** is going to pay for my living at university, I can tell you that 8000 pounds is not enough for me to survive on.
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AgeOfTheBimbo
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(Original post by justanotherchica)
im 17 and I work because my mum can hardly afford to buy me shoes. good point but I wouldn't be very happy to walk through snow in ballerina shoes, thank god i can afford to buy proper shoes. and who the **** is going to pay for my living at university, I can tell you that 8000 pounds is not enough for me to survive on.
Where is Dad?

Are you mixed race?

The extended family should always prevent /intervene in the event of unsuitable partners. But the whole of western society is ****ed up, tackling any one of these issues alone wont work without a completely Islamic centric governance.
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justanotherchica
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(Original post by TCA2b)
I mean automation in and of itself will probably render a single earner household more viable, depressing costs and increasing the earnings a single earner can make in less time.

I doubt many women want to be working full time when they could be spending that time raising their kids, especially during their formative years. Would they want to enter the workforce if they did not feel they had to for financial reasons? I’m sure some would, but the majority? If I were a woman I don’t think I’d see the appeal since there’s more to life than some empty career.
I wouldn't mean being at home but atleast having a part time job or being an author something like that.
but my husband might divorce me, I dont want my children to be poor because poor children do worst at school, I dont want to waste my education
my dad divorced my mum after 25 years of marriage, and for the first tiem in her life at 45 years of age she has had to work outside the home and it was vry difficult at first. I don't want to end up like her
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ed98
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(Original post by AgeOfTheBimbo)
Where is Dad?

Are you mixed race?

The extended family should always prevent /intervene in the event of unsuitable partners. But the whole of western society is ****ed up, tackling any one of these issues alone wont work without a completely Islamic centric governance.
Troll confimed
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monkeyman0121
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Nice trolls. (If you are serious then you are stupid, things changed because it was worse off than before.)
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TCA2b
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(Original post by justanotherchica)
I wouldn't mean being at home but atleast having a part time job or being an author something like that.
but my husband might divorce me, I dont want my children to be poor because poor children do worst at school, I dont want to waste my education
my dad divorced my mum after 25 years of marriage, and for the first tiem in her life at 45 years of age she has had to work outside the home and it was vry difficult at first. I don't want to end up like her
Yeah I think that is definitely a valid point. I was referencing more so the pursuit of a full time job, but yes it is prudent to build a means of supporting oneself if need be.
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AgeOfTheBimbo
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(Original post by TCA2b)
Yeah I think that is definitely a valid point. I was referencing more so the pursuit of a full time job, but yes it is prudent to build a means of supporting oneself if need be.
Ideally the church/neighbourhood/extended family should intervene and provide the required welfare. Divorce however should not be seen to be an socially acceptable option.
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justanotherchica
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(Original post by AgeOfTheBimbo)
Where is Dad?

Are you mixed race?

The extended family should always prevent /intervene in the event of unsuitable partners. But the whole of western society is ****ed up, tackling any one of these issues alone wont work without a completely Islamic centric governance.

I am not mixed race at all
my parents are both of the same race they had an arranged marriage with a very traditional gender roles in place within the home.
my dad cheated on her with a woman he deemed moe suitable because she was also a busineswoman and fiercely independent ( ironic right)
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AgeOfTheBimbo
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(Original post by justanotherchica)
I am not mixed race at all
my parents are both of the same race they had an arranged marriage with a very traditional gender roles in place within the home.
my dad cheated on her with a woman he deemed moe suitable because she was also a busineswoman and fiercely independent ( ironic right)
Ideally he'd be flogged along with the other *****.
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loginrunner
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This might be hard for you to believe but some women actually don't want children, so having a good career and going to work would be very important to those women.
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justanotherchica
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(Original post by AgeOfTheBimbo)
Ideally the church/neighbourhood/extended family should intervene and provide the required welfare. Divorce however should not be seen to be an socially acceptable option.
even in the case of rape, domestic and sexual abuse
you see I agree with you guys that women are more biologically attracted to motherhood and children and being within the home but I think the rest is just taking it too far
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AgeOfTheBimbo
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(Original post by loginrunner)
This might be hard for you to believe but some women actually don't want children, so having a good career and going to work would be very important to those women.
Thats a pointless existence, the gift of motherhood is the greatest honour. The problem is aswell that a lot of women do start off in a career and then ****ing have to go on maternity leave. I mean what a **** trick that is totally throwing an organisation in to chaos.
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The RAR
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We are not in the middle ages you know
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justanotherchica
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(Original post by AgeOfTheBimbo)
Thats a pointless existence, the gift of motherhood is the greatest honour. The problem is aswell that a lot of women do start off in a career and then ****ing have to go on maternity leave. I mean what a **** trick that is totally throwing an organisation in to chaos.
you know, a lot of these arguments have a very intellectual basis but when I hint undertones of your fundamentalist christian beliefs I can't take you seriously and thats why peopel wont take this thread seriously unless you approach from it a different angle than "the gift of motherhood" like that makes me cringe . You wanna really argue say something like "most women have a natural biological urge to have children" etc. and then people will acc take you seriously and debate your properly.
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