Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

LSE Management or Kings Economics and Management watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    Hi there guys in a bit of a predicament at the minute, I applied to study economics and management at Oxford which was the ideal course i wanted, unfortunately I was rejected, I also applied to KCL for economics and management and LSE for economics, I received an offer from KCL, and was rejected by LSE, however LSE did something quite odd and offered me a place on their Bsc Management course.

    I'm quite confused which course to firm, I always wanted to study economics because of the mathematical applications it will have to the real world which would be beneficial to a variety of careers, however from my research, the LSE management course is also very quantitative, and I do have a flair for management. Advice/help is much appreciated, thanks
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    LSE is essentially the only uni that competes with Oxbridge in terms of getting your foot in the door, particularly in London. Also, LSE also allows you to switch course quite easily, I know people who have switched as many as 4/5 times in 1 year, LSE rarely if ever reject course changes. So you have some flexibility if management isn't for you. In terms of reputation LSE outstrips King's massively, particularly as King's aren't known for economics at all. But King's name still holds a decent amount of weight and I would say in terms of social factors King's is much better than LSE with a better student culture. In summary, if you're an academic person that wants one of the best environments to learn in the world then go to LSE, if you want the more traditional all round student experience go to King's.
    • Community Assistant
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    As above, there are some major ramifications of going to LSE in terms of relative "prestige", which for better or for worse is a major consideration for high profile business roles. You study the same first year course in Economics as the economists (and everyone else) at LSE in the Management course, but you have the "basic" maths course(s) compared with the economics programme, which has more advanced (and extensive - a full course in each maths and stats, as opposed to a half course in each for management) maths courses.

    This means it's unlikely you'd be able to transfer into the economics course without some serious goodwill from the director of studies, but there are plenty of other courses that share the same, simpler maths courses as the management course you could potentially swap into. Equally, if your aim is not to become an economist, the content of the Management course is more than sufficient for the vast majority of business and finance roles (including investment banking which seems to be the only interest of people on here).

    Kings is still good, but as above KCL vs LSE is very much the same as KCL vs Oxbridge - there is a considerably gap, and even though KCL will be at or near the top of the pack behind those forerunners, that is something to bear in mind. However, student satisfaction has been a consistent issue for LSE the past 5~10 years, which can be telling. You may wish to see former students comments regarding each institution, while also considering other factors such as where you'll be living, studying (specifically, not just "in London") - I would recommend visiting each if you haven't yet, and perhaps revisiting them if possible now knowing you hold offers. I appreciate this may not be possible however, and you can still find a lot of this information out on their respective webpages.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by GapYaar)
    LSE is essentially the only uni that competes with Oxbridge in terms of getting your foot in the door, particularly in London. Also, LSE also allows you to switch courses quite easily, I know people who have switched as many as 4/5 times in 1 year, LSE rarely if ever reject course changes. So you have some flexibility if management isn't for you. In terms of reputation LSE outstrips King's massively, particularly as King's aren't known for economics at all. But King's name still holds a decent amount of weight and I would say in terms of social factors King's is much better than LSE with a better student culture. In summary, if you're an academic person that wants one of the best environments to learn in the world then go to LSE, if you want the more traditional all round student experience go to King's.
    True true, but what do you think about the disparity between courses, and career prospects of both degrees
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    As above, there are some major ramifications of going to LSE in terms of relative "prestige", which for better or for worse is a major consideration for high profile business roles. You study the same first year course in Economics as the economists (and everyone else) at LSE in the Management course, but you have the "basic" maths course(s) compared with the economics programme, which has more advanced (and extensive - a full course in each maths and stats, as opposed to a half course in each for management) maths courses.

    This means it's unlikely you'd be able to transfer into the economics course without some serious goodwill from the director of studies, but there are plenty of other courses that share the same, simpler maths courses as the management course you could potentially swap into. Equally, if your aim is not to become an economist, the content of the Management course is more than sufficient for the vast majority of business and finance roles (including investment banking which seems to be the only interest of people on here).

    Kings is still good, but as above KCL vs LSE is very much the same as KCL vs Oxbridge - there is a considerably gap, and even though KCL will be at or near the top of the pack behind those forerunners, that is something to bear in mind. However, student satisfaction has been a consistent issue for LSE the past 5~10 years, which can be telling. You may wish to see former students comments regarding each institution, while also considering other factors such as where you'll be living, studying (specifically, not just "in London" - I would recommend visiting each if you haven't yet, and perhaps revisiting them if possible now knowing you hold offers. I appreciate this may not be possible however, and you can still find a lot of this information out on their respective webpages.
    Thank you, I don't really wanna be an economist, but I do enjoy macroeconomics and global development theories etc, Im looking for a job that will give me the global perspective and mathematical understanding to work in any industry, some people have said the course E&M at KCL is better than the Management course at LSE, what do you think about this, some bias from them considering they want to study at KCL next year
    • Community Assistant
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by B4sh)
    Thank you, I don't really wanna be an economist, but I do enjoy macroeconomics and global development theories etc, Im looking for a job that will give me the global perspective and mathematical understanding to work in any industry, some people have said the course E&M at KCL is better than the Management course at LSE, what do you think about this, some bias from them considering they want to study at KCL next year
    At the end of the day, it's LSE. Whether the course is "better" is an abstract notion compared with the fact LSE opens every door, while KCL opens...most doors.

    Also management isn't exactly an "academic" field so, in this sense the academic merit (or lack thereof) of the course pales in comparison to it's ability to secure you employment. While both will do that to an extent, LSE tag will do more towards that, I'd wager.

    However again, do seriously consider the environment of both universities - the student satisfaction ratings is not a trivial matter and can be indicative of serious underlying problems in the administration. Of course, it may not, and this does vary between departments...but the adage "where there's smoke, there's fire" should be kept in mind.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    At the end of the day, it's LSE. Whether the course is "better" is an abstract notion compared with the fact LSE opens every door, while KCL opens...most doors.

    Also management isn't exactly an "academic" field so, in this sense the academic merit (or lack thereof) of the course pales in comparison to it's ability to secure you employment. While both will do that to an extent, LSE tag will do more towards that, I'd wager.

    However again, do seriously consider the environment of both universities - the student satisfaction ratings is not a trivial matter and can be indicative of serious underlying problems in the administration. Of course, it may not, and this does vary between departments...but the adage "where there's smoke, there's fire" should be kept in mind.
    True, I will be looking into that. And what do you mean about the academic lack, are you suggesting that the course isnt one which is highly sought after, didn't really understand what you were getting at there.
    • Community Assistant
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by B4sh)
    True, I will be looking into that. And what do you mean about the academic lack, are you suggesting that the course isnt one which is highly sought after, didn't really understand what you were getting at there.
    No, I mean nobody does a PhD in Business (ok people do, but it's not the same as Economics which is a thriving and varied academic area)

    An Economics degree is, ostensibly, training students to become research academics in Economics, at the top tier universities. Of course they realise many of their students won't be doing this, but the format of the courses is framed in this academic mindset. Management courses are more likely to be in tune with the needs of the contemporary business and finance sectors and the industry standards followed there, particularly for high profile courses/institutions like LSE. There is a reason you study accounting in management degrees and not economics ones (normally, anyway, outside of options)!

    Also this isn't to say that the LSE Management course is going to be a doss - it'll be of the same rigour as the Economics course there, but they may have slightly different approaches to teaching and assessment between the two departments (although as mentioned, there is at least one overlapping course anyway).
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    No, I mean nobody does a PhD in Business (ok people do, but it's not the same as Economics which is a thriving and varied academic area)

    An Economics degree is, ostensibly, training students to become research academics in Economics, at the top tier universities. Of course they realise many of their students won't be doing this, but the format of the courses is framed in this academic mindset. Management courses are more likely to be in tune with the needs of the contemporary business and finance sectors and the industry standards followed there, particularly for high profile courses/institutions like LSE. There is a reason you study accounting in management degrees and not economics ones (normally, anyway, outside of options)!

    Also this isn't to say that the LSE Management course is going to be a doss - it'll be of the same rigour as the Economics course there, but they may have slightly different approaches to teaching and assessment between the two departments (although as mentioned, there is at least one overlapping course anyway).

    Ah I see, so for someone who wants to have the freedom to work in any industry, have a greater global perspective and obviously make money, what choice would you make?
    • Community Assistant
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by B4sh)
    Ah I see, so for someone who wants to have the freedom to work in any industry, have a greater global perspective and obviously make money, what choice would you make?
    Probably LSE (at least if I was theoretically in your position and hence not riddled with mental health problems the environment would most likely exacerbate). You can take Macroeconomics as an option in secnod/third year, and other various options such as EU Law, Commerical Law, Economic History, International Management/HR, and various further mathematical/quantitative methods and statistics options - it's pretty widely ranging.

    You may want to peruse some of the options available here: http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/calen...Management.htm

    although bear in mind they won't necessarily all be available every year, and sometimes they do change options, withdrawing or offering new ones. However some courses which are core to several degrees will likely always be available (such as Macreconomic Principles).
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    Probably LSE (at least if I was theoretically in your position and hence not riddled with mental health problems the environment would most likely exacerbate). You can take Macroeconomics as an option in secnod/third year, and other various options such as EU Law, Commerical Law, Economic History, International Management/HR, and various further mathematical/quantitative methods and statistics options - it's pretty widely ranging.

    You may want to peruse some of the options available here: http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/calen...Management.htm

    although bear in mind they won't necessarily all be available every year, and sometimes they do change options, withdrawing or offering new ones. However some courses which are core to several degrees will likely always be available (such as Macreconomic Principles).
    Thanks for your help mate, could explain a bit more about the studen satisfaction thing at LSE
    • Community Assistant
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by B4sh)
    Thanks for your help mate, could explain a bit more about the studen satisfaction thing at LSE
    I'd recommend looking through comments made by past students here (and elsewhere) on that front. But keep in mind "student satisfaction" doesn't (necessarily) translate to "had good pubs nearby". Often poor support of students with mental health problems, disabilities, students from marginalised backgrounds, etc, etc, will be reflected in this.

    Of course, some students will use them just to reflect how easily they're able to get drunk (this sometimes dings Warwick a bit), so you need to exercise some discretion in evaluating that...
 
 
 
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?
Applying to uni

All the essentials

The adventure begins mug

Student life: what to expect

What it's really like going to uni

Graduates celebrate

How to write a good personal statement

Expert PS advice from the people who will read it

Uni match

Uni match

Can't decide where to apply? Our tool will help you find the perfect course

Two students working together

A-Z of universities

Read our guides to unis and colleges from around the UK

A student working on a computer

Personal statement help

Use our tool to get your ideal PS quickly!

Hands typing

Degrees without fees

Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

A student looking down a microscope

Planning open days

Find upcoming open days and get advice on preparing.

Help out other students

These questions still need an answer

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.