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    Basically I regret all of my subjects (English lit, Psychology and Government and Politics) as I feel like it doesn't represent my abilities. I initially wanted to do law but 1. my grades aren't good enough and 2. I now find it boring. I feel like should have chose more respectable subjects like Maths or the Sciences. I also believe that the subject I am going to study for uni Politics/ Politics and International Relations won't benefit me in the future. Moving to America to study not only would the degrees be more respected, I feel like due to their academic flexibility would give me more time to decide what I want to do with my life. So, if possible after exams should I take a gap year then apply to an american universities?
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    If you feel that it is the best option for you and you have excellent grades and excellent extracurriculars (and you accept you and your parents may have to contribute towards the cost of it [depends on how much you earn and all other financial information]), then definitely apply. However it is not ideal to say you don't want to do a subject at university because it won't benefit you in the future. You should choose your subject based off what you enjoy and what you love, not the career prospects that go with it.

    If you decide you do want to apply to American universities, send me a message (or look at my post history), I can help guide you with what you need to do and give you some advice. (I applied to a university and have got in with full financial aid).
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    Well the first thing is, do you have oodles of money at your disposal? If not, and if you do have less than stellar grades, it's not a realistic option.

    In any case, if you want to "change direction" to STEM areas, you may want to consider a degree with a foundation year - these are relatively common in STEM subjects. This is considerably less expensive and easier to apply to.
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    To reply to both of your questions, no I don't.

    (Original post by theholychilli)
    If you feel that it is the best option for you and you have excellent grades and excellent extracurriculars (and you accept you and your parents may have to contribute towards the cost of it [depends on how much you earn and all other financial information]), then definitely apply. However it is not ideal to say you don't want to do a subject at university because it won't benefit you in the future. You should choose your subject based off what you enjoy and what you love, not the career prospects that go with it.

    If you decide you do want to apply to American universities, send me a message (or look at my post history), I can help guide you with what you need to do and give you some advice. (I applied to a university and have got in with full financial aid).
    I appreciate your advice but I feel like doing what I wanted is what got me into this messy situation
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    Well the first thing is, do you have oodles of money at your disposal? If not, and if you do have less than stellar grades, it's not a realistic option.

    In any case, if you want to "change direction" to STEM areas, you may want to consider a degree with a foundation year - these are relatively common in STEM subjects. This is considerably less expensive and easier to apply to.
    I have already gone past this year's UCAS deadline so is it too late for me to consider that?
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    (Original post by DoyinH)
    I have already gone past this year's UCAS deadline so is it too late for me to consider that?
    It's not a hard deadline, only for equal consideration. Try ringing a few unis and asking if such courses are still taking applications.

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    (Original post by DoyinH)
    I have already gone past this year's UCAS deadline so is it too late for me to consider that?
    UCAS Extra is for this situation
    https://www.ucas.com/ucas/undergradu.../extra-choices

    And when you search for courses make sure you filter using "show courses with vacancies".


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    Consider that you will get no financial aid and you have to pay off each term/year straight away.
    You could argue small scholarship grants are financial aids but a thousand dollars taken off your 20k tuition fee literally makes no difference.
    And as far as I'm aware it's around 17-24k average dollars for unis each year of study (12-17k pounds), some are private some are public hence the great price difference.
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    I would say sit the American ACT exam first and see what you get. If it’s 30+ and you’re good at writing essays then apply, that’s what I’ve done. I can’t pay for anything but there are some needs-blind unis who will pay for anything if you’re accepted. Do a lot of research though! The financial aid forms and using their (sort of) version of UCAS (called the Common app) takes time. Really research the different unis like if you’d rather go to Liberal Arts, go to the American Uni fair in London in September and find the ones that’d suit you. Hope that helps! 😊 3 people in my school have gone to the states and didn’t have to pay a thing!
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    If you're Brit, stick to UK.

    If you aren't Brit, then do yourself a favor and go to the United States.
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    Why don't you just take a gap year and figure out what you want to study in the UK? Your financial support in the US is going to be tiny, and you're not going to get into a particularly respected institution by the sounds of your grades. Just doesn't seem to actually be any point. You don't have to go to Uni RIGHT NOW, or even in the next couple of years. Work for a bit, look around, travel or whatever, figure out what you want to do, then do it in the UK.
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    (Original post by ZombieTheWolf)
    Consider that you will get no financial aid and you have to pay off each term/year straight away.
    You could argue small scholarship grants are financial aids but a thousand dollars taken off your 20k tuition fee literally makes no difference.
    And as far as I'm aware it's around 17-24k average dollars for unis each year of study (12-17k pounds), some are private some are public hence the great price difference.
    Hi, what you said about getting no financial aid is incorrect. There are many US universities that give out a lot of financial aid to international students. I'm going to be attending a $75,000/year college for 4 years and I'm going to graduate debt free, as I have a $70k/year financial aid package. It's from a university you most likely have never heard of (its not even needblind for internationals!), but it is one of the best in the US, and I know many people who have gotten into loads of places in the US with amazing financial aid.

    There are loads of universities and liberal arts colleges that offer great financial aid to internationals, you just have to be a good applicant. Also, private universities are the universities that tend to have higher tuition and cost of attendances (e.g. $50,000-80,000), but they are the ones that give out the best financial aid to internationals (as far as I'm aware, state schools in the US do not give internationals funding -- unless its on a scholarship, e.g. Morehead-Cain or Jefferson Scholarship @ UVA).

    The cost is not a setback!
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    Hell yeah! If I had the money, I would've gone to college in the USA. Much, much better education system. You have all the cool football games and the fraternities/sororities. Plus if you realise you don't like what you're studying you can easily change major. Also you get more contact hours and better tuition. Here you're tied into the same degree from the moment you arrive to university.
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    If you want to get shot then yeah, go to an American uni
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    (Original post by theholychilli)
    Hi, what you said about getting no financial aid is incorrect. There are many US universities that give out a lot of financial aid to international students. I'm going to be attending a $75,000/year college for 4 years and I'm going to graduate debt free, as I have a $70k/year financial aid package. It's from a university you most likely have never heard of (its not even needblind for internationals!), but it is one of the best in the US, and I know many people who have gotten into loads of places in the US with amazing financial aid.

    There are loads of universities and liberal arts colleges that offer great financial aid to internationals, you just have to be a good applicant. Also, private universities are the universities that tend to have higher tuition and cost of attendances (e.g. $50,000-80,000), but they are the ones that give out the best financial aid to internationals (as far as I'm aware, state schools in the US do not give internationals funding -- unless its on a scholarship, e.g. Morehead-Cain or Jefferson Scholarship @ UVA).

    The cost is not a setback!
    Oh.
    I apologise for the incorrect information I spouted then lol.
    I should have probably tailored it to OP's career interests (Liberal Arts) as when I was looking it was for very competitive courses and had my dreams crushed lol!
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    (Original post by theholychilli)
    Hi, what you said about getting no financial aid is incorrect. There are many US universities that give out a lot of financial aid to international students. I'm going to be attending a $75,000/year college for 4 years and I'm going to graduate debt free, as I have a $70k/year financial aid package. It's from a university you most likely have never heard of (its not even needblind for internationals!), but it is one of the best in the US, and I know many people who have gotten into loads of places in the US with amazing financial aid.

    There are loads of universities and liberal arts colleges that offer great financial aid to internationals, you just have to be a good applicant. Also, private universities are the universities that tend to have higher tuition and cost of attendances (e.g. $50,000-80,000), but they are the ones that give out the best financial aid to internationals (as far as I'm aware, state schools in the US do not give internationals funding -- unless its on a scholarship, e.g. Morehead-Cain or Jefferson Scholarship @ UVA).

    The cost is not a setback!
    lol Vanderbilt is one of the best US universities.. and arguably the world

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    lol Vanderbilt is one of the best US universities.. and arguably the world

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    I know, and many people (many people I know of) haven't really heard of it. In fact, I had never even heard of it myself before last July
 
 
 

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