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    Hi guys, Can somebody please help me with this question:

    'Explain how the posterior pituitary gland provides a link to the nervous system.'

    Thank you so much
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    (Original post by Rasaa22)
    Hi guys, Can somebody please help me with this question:

    'Explain how the posterior pituitary gland provides a link to the nervous system.'

    Thank you so much
    The posterior pituitary is derived embryologically from the neuroectoderm, and is therefore made up of nervous tissue rather than glandular tissue, like the anterior pituitary. The posterior pituitary is connected to the hypothalamus by neurosecretory cells (which are neuroendocrine neurones), in fact, the cell bodies of these cells lie within the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei in the hypothalamus, while their axons project from the hypothalamus to the posterior pituitary. ADH and oxytocin are synthesised in the cell bodies of these neurones and are stored in vesicles within the axon terminals in the posterior pituitary. When these neurones are activated, the neurones depolarise leading to the release of ADH and oxytocin from the axon terminals in the posterior pituitary into the bloodstream. Therefore the posterior pituitary is neuroendocrine - a neurone that releases a hormone into the blood.
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    (Original post by Jpw1097)
    The posterior pituitary is derived embryologically from the neuroectoderm, and is therefore made up of nervous tissue rather than glandular tissue, like the anterior pituitary. The posterior pituitary is connected to the hypothalamus by neurosecretory cells (which are neuroendocrine neurones), in fact, the cell bodies of these cells lie within the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei in the hypothalamus, while their axons project from the hypothalamus to the posterior pituitary. ADH and oxytocin are synthesised in the cell bodies of these neurones and are stored in vesicles within the axon terminals in the posterior pituitary. When these neurones are activated, the neurones depolarise leading to the release of ADH and oxytocin from the axon terminals in the posterior pituitary into the bloodstream. Therefore the posterior pituitary is neuroendocrine - a neurone that releases a hormone into the blood.
    Thank you so much, You are the best!!
 
 
 

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